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Miami Heat Bet $1 Win $100 Playoff chances
Fri, 07 May 2021 14:07:25 GMT

Miami has +3,800 odds — meaning a $100 bet would win $4,000 — to win the NBA Finals, according to sportsbetting.com. The Heat have the ninth-best odds to win the title, behind the Nets (+225), Lakers (+325), Clippers (+550), Jazz (+750), Bucks (+900) and 76ers (+1,200).

Bet $1 Win $100

Don’t miss your chance to pocket an easy $100!

The Heat are showcasing their potential on both sides of the court and Victor Oladipo (knee) has been sidelined and Tyler Herro (foot) is banged up as well. The Heat have some incredible depth on paper, but won’t have the luxury of resting players down the stretch with just a few games separating the No. 6 and No. 10 seeds in the East.

The Heat have  won four of five contests and may be restoring the chemistry that carried them to the NBA Finals in the 2020 bubble.  Kendrick Nunn has had a nice run in the past five games, averaging 20.4 points while adding a defensive presence. Likewise for the chimeric Bam Adebayo, who is averaging 19.4 points, 8 rebounds and 6 assists over his past five outings. The Heat are knotted up with the Hawks for the fifth seed in the East and are just 1.5 games behind the Knicks for the fourth seed and home-court advantage.

 

Team Roster
 
  NAMEPOSAGEHTWTCOLLEGESALARY
 
https://a.espncdn.com/i/headshots/nba/players/full/4431679.png
PF
21
6′ 8″
225 lbs
Memphis
$2,582,160
 
https://a.espncdn.com/i/headshots/nba/players/full/4066261.png
C
23
6′ 9″
255 lbs
Kentucky
$5,115,492
 
https://a.espncdn.com/i/headshots/nba/players/full/2426.png
SF
35
6′ 8″
215 lbs
UCLA
$12,800,000
 
https://a.espncdn.com/i/headshots/nba/players/full/4269.png
F
32
6′ 10″
234 lbs
$7,150,000
 
https://a.espncdn.com/i/headshots/nba/players/full/6430.png
SF
31
6′ 7″
230 lbs
Marquette
$34,379,100
 
https://a.espncdn.com/i/headshots/nba/players/full/2580913.png
C
31
7′ 0″
245 lbs
USC
 
https://a.espncdn.com/i/headshots/nba/players/full/3423.png
PG
34
6′ 3″
190 lbs
$18,000,000
 
https://a.espncdn.com/i/headshots/nba/players/full/2184.png
PF
40
6′ 8″
235 lbs
Florida
$1,620,564
 
https://a.espncdn.com/i/headshots/nba/players/full/4395725.png
PG
21
6′ 5″
195 lbs
Kentucky
$2,582,160
 
https://a.espncdn.com/i/headshots/nba/players/full/2386.png
SF
37
6′ 6″
215 lbs
Arizona
$15,000,000
 
https://a.espncdn.com/i/headshots/nba/players/full/3056247.png
SG
25
6′ 2″
190 lbs
Illinois
$1,663,861
 
https://a.espncdn.com/i/headshots/nba/players/full/4278521.png
SF
21
6′ 8″
215 lbs
Stanford
$1,517,981
 
https://a.espncdn.com/i/headshots/nba/players/full/2527963.png
SG
28
6′ 4″
213 lbs
Indiana
$21,000,000
 
https://a.espncdn.com/i/headshots/nba/players/full/3157465.png
SG
27
6′ 7″
215 lbs
Michigan
$1,663,861
 
https://a.espncdn.com/i/headshots/nba/players/full/4065778.png
SG
25
6′ 5″
215 lbs
DePaul
$898,310
 
https://a.espncdn.com/i/headshots/nba/players/full/3137259.png
PG
24
6′ 3″
200 lbs
UC Santa Barbara
Category: William Hill
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Atlanta Hawks shock the Philadelphia 76ers on their way to the second Eastern Conference final in 50 years
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 06:56:01 GMT
Atlanta Hawks shock the Philadelphia 76ers on their way to the second Eastern Conference final in 50 years

10:56 p.m. ET

Andrew LopezESPN

Atlanta Hawks striker John Collins was in a good mood Sunday night, and for good reason.

After watching his Hawks defeat the host Philadelphia 76ers 103-96, Collins smiled. Maybe it was because he’d lost three seasons in Atlanta. Maybe it was because he was wearing a t-shirt with a picture of his dunk on Sixers Center Joel Embiid from Game 6.

Either way, the longest-serving Hawk in four seasons was a lucky man.

1 relatives

“Everyone is excited,” said Collins. “We have worked all year to be in moments like this. In Game 7, I have the feeling that we all supported each other. We couldn’t have wanted anything more than we did tonight. We prevailed for a win.”

For Collins’ first three seasons in Atlanta, the Hawks were 73-158, the fourth worst win rate for that period (2017-20). They weren’t invited to the Bubble in Orlando, Florida last season. The losses just kept mounting. And at the beginning of the 2020/21 season, it didn’t seem to get any better.

On March 1st, the Hawks were 14-20 years old and had just fired their head coach. Three and a half months later, they storm into the final of the Eastern Conference. It was the franchise’s first road game win, 7 in 10 attempts. The win sends the Hawks into the conference finals for only the second time in the last 50 years – and to a place that seemed unthinkable to many when Nate McMillan took over the interim coach from Lloyd Pierce.

When asked whether he thought this was possible when he took over, McMillan instead pointed out what he wanted to build up as the new manager.

“We tried to build a culture that would win and create a style that would allow these guys to win games,” said McMillan. “It’s respect for the game. You play the game every night with an effort. You play the game together. And you trust each other.

“Those were the things I wanted to build with this group. I felt like we had some talent, even though it was young talent. If we could get that into our system and basically learn to play and play to win, we could do it. ” win a few games. “

The Hawks are only the third team in the current playoff format (since 1984) to reach the conference finals, despite a record loss on the All-Star hiatus when Atlanta was 16-20 years old. The other two teams that did so – the 2012 Celtics (15-17) and the 1984 Suns (19-24) – failed to make it to the NBA finals.

McMillan is also the seventh coach in NBA history to bring a team to the Conference Finals during a season he became head coach during the season. The previous four coaches – Tyronn Lue (2016 Cavaliers), Pat Riley (twice: 2006 Heat, 1982 Lakers) and Paul Westhead (1980 Lakers) – all led their teams to the NBA championship.

The Hawks took three wins on the road in that series to move forward, despite a poor shooting night from Star Guard Trae Young. The third-year point guard, so stable so far in the playoffs, shot 5-of-23 from the field and 2-of-11 from the 3-point line.

However, Young came at a pivotal point with his second made 3-pointer when he nailed a 29-footer with 2:31 remaining to improve the Hawks by seven.

The Sixers were able to reduce the lead to one, but after Matisse Thybulle fouled Kevin Huerter in a 3-point attempt 54 seconds before the end, Huerter knocked all three free throws to the ground to push it back to a four-point game. In subsequent possession, Embiid spun the ball when Danilo Gallinari threw the ball away. Huerter picked up the loose ball and tossed it to Gallinari, who slammed it home to calm the Philadelphia believers.

It was the second consecutive hostile environment the Hawks had to play in after going through the New York Knicks at Madison Square Garden in the first round.

“We went to two difficult places and played,” said Young. “It was a great environment. Loved it. Loved the s — talking. Loved everything about it. It was great. We got two wins. I’m happy about that. It was fun.”

Young finished the race with 21 points and 10 assists. According to ESPN Stats & Information research, he is the second player in Hawks history to double-double with point templates in a game 7 on the road. The only other Hawk to do this is current Philadelphia trainer Doc Rivers.

Young also now has 12 straight games with at least 20 points and seven assists, the longest such streak in NBA postseason history.

“The confidence is still there. The confidence will remain the same,” said Young. “Everyone is happy we made it to the Eastern Conference finals, but we’re not satisfied. It’s great we’re here, but we still have a few games to go.”

The Hawks reached the final final of the conference in 2015 when they were eventually swept by the Cleveland Cavaliers. Previously, they had not reached the round before the NBA final since the 1969/70 season when they lost the then division final to the Los Angeles Lakers. Back then, it only took a series win to get that far.

The last time the Hawks reached the NBA Finals was in 1961, when the St. Louis Hawks lost to the Boston Celtics.

While Young struggled to gain momentum from the field and start supervisor Bogdan Bogdanovic was hampered by a knee injury, Hürter took on the scorers’ burden. He finished with a playoff career high of 27 points. Huerter’s regular season career high also came in Philadelphia when he dropped 29 points in his rookie season.

Like Collins, Huerter remembers hearing about developments over the past few seasons but knew this season should be different. The Hawks switched to Clint Capela last season and spent the off-season signing free agents like Gallinari. They made a trade on Lou Williams during the season to get a hit from the bench.

“It was a long couple of years ago. It was a long two years down in the east,” said Hürter. “And this year when we tried to flip a switch, our whole mindset changed. The development process was over. Just something like the climax to this point, the three years where people just worked and believed in it what we want to build here Atlanta and what we continue to try and build here.

“It’s been a great three years, but hopefully the journey is only just beginning.”

The post Atlanta Hawks shock the Philadelphia 76ers on their way to the second Eastern Conference final in 50 years first appeared on Peach State Press.

Category: Atlanta
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Wyoming Wildlife Federation shares update from the first meeting of the Wildlife Task Force Force
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 00:18:07 GMT
Wyoming Wildlife Federation shares update from the first meeting of the Wildlife Task Force Force

(Lander, WY) The Wildlife Task Force met for the first time on June 16-17 to begin the process of addressing the biggest hot button issues with Wyoming’s licensing system, hunter access, and overall wildlife management.

The group will continue to make recommendations with solutions to various problems to the relevant governing bodies through 2022. During this two-day meeting, the Task Force established ground rules for subsequent meetings, selected positions as co-chairs, and identified key issues that need to be addressed first.

The task force co-chairs elected were Josh Coursey and Rusty Bell. Coursey is the Hunter, President, and Co-Founder of the Muley Fanatic Foundation, and currently a resident of Green River, Wyoming. Bell owns Rusty’s Gillette Taxidermy, is the Campbell County Commissioner, and also an avid hunter in Wyoming.

The election of these two members as co-chairs diversified the positions with members from completely opposite sides of Wyoming. The choice of the two was also positive, as many citizens expressed concern about the number of large landowners, equipment suppliers and leaders in the task force.

“Coursey and Bell represent the larger public sports community as a whole and are thoughtful leaders who clearly care deeply about the wildlife and hunters of Wyoming. We are very pleased to see you co-chair this task force, ”said Jess Johnson, director of government affairs for the Wyoming Wildlife Federation.

h / t WWF – Jess Johnson, Wyoming Wildlife Federation director of government affairs, testifies

Some of the Task Force’s recommendations are regulations controlled by the Game and Fish Commission, while others are bills that Wyoming elected officials can vote on during a legislature. In any case, the fewer members of the task force agree with these recommendations, the less importance they should be given. Therefore, the members discussed whether the recommendations would be accepted by a majority or at some other higher level.

Rep. Albert Sommers, a landowner, rancher and athlete from Pinedale, was passionate about 85% approval or more for all recommendations. As MP Sommers put it, “I will not be voting for a recommendation if I see that it does not find broad public support”.

Although the group advanced by majority vote on all decisions, the discussion showed that there will be strong efforts to get as close as possible to a unanimous agreement on the part of the group in order to strengthen the legitimacy of the group’s recommendations.

“The robust discussion and care with which these issues are being addressed was evident. As is the consistent effort to take all stakeholders into account when recommending a recommendation. Seeing this meeting and the people sitting at the table makes me optimistic that the task force will provide solutions that are positive for Wyoming, its local hunters and its wildlife, ”said Jess Johnson of the Wyoming Wildlife Federation.

Whether or not they will be involved in the licensing of the “Big 5” species (bighorn sheep, elk, mountain goat, bison and grizzly bear) at their meeting on July 8, 2021 in Casper, Wyoming.

The vote will recommend (or not) a 90% resident and 10% non-resident allocation, a change of around 75% resident and 25% non-resident allocation that will be in effect today at the next meeting.

The discussion will also include making future licenses a one-off hunting opportunity for these coveted species, and excluding the cow / calf, ewe / lamb possibilities that are essential for long-term control of population numbers.

Says Jess Johnson: “The association endorses the allocation of 90/10 to the ‘Big 5’ but acknowledges that for the final recommendation there are still subtleties to be discussed in order to secure wildlife management funding and the ability to meet management objectives achieve is not possible negatively affected. “

The first issue for the task force is controversial, however Wyoming Outfitters and Guides Association President Sy Gilliland showed immediate support for 90/10 by assigning the “Big 5” tag. “I want my grandchildren to have a chance at these hunting opportunities, and that’s a perspective we can all agree on,” said Gilliland.

Ensuring hunting opportunities for future Wyomingites was a common goal for all members of the task force. How that looks in the future is up to the task force and the citizens who get involved.

The post Wyoming Wildlife Federation shares update from the first meeting of the Wildlife Task Force Force first appeared on Daily Wyoming Cowboy.

Category: Casper
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Opioid abuse up during pandemic, expert tells Utah County
Sun, 20 Jun 2021 23:19:13 GMT
Opioid abuse up during pandemic, expert tells Utah County

The public health professor names the stress of COVID-19 and the pandemic making support inaccessible as contributing factors.

(Patrick Sison | The Associated Press) This 2017 photo shows an array of pills for the opioid oxycodone acetaminophen in New York. One of the many negative effects of the COVID-19 pandemic in Utah has been an increase in opioid abuse, according to a health expert.

By Connor Richards | The daily herald

Provo • One of the many negative effects of the COVID-19 pandemic in Utah County and across the state and county has been an increase in opioid abuse, according to a local public health expert.

This information was presented to the Utah County Commission during a working session on Wednesday where Gabriela Murza, who leads the Utah State University Extension’s HEART initiative, discussed the state-funded program that “brings academic resources to the community, local and national partnerships to address the opioid epidemic and other pressing public health issues, ”the Daily Herald reported.

According to Murza, the program operates in nine counties, including Utah County, “where opioid use disorder has had some of the most devastating effects in terms of overdose and death-related opioid use.” Other counties served by the program include Salt Lake, Davis, Tooele, and Box Elder counties.

Murza told commissioners that opioid use disorder rates have “leveled off” in recent years and “the trend seems to be getting a little better in Utah”.

But, added the public health professor, “then 2020 struck and wherever the numbers went up, they went up to death from opioids.”

“In Utah County in particular, trends seem to be going down or flattening out. You seem to be getting better. But here, too, these numbers are skewed with events like COVID, and it could take some time to bring these values ​​back down, ”said Murza.

While national data are typically two years behind, meaning the latest available national data is from 2019, Murza expects “some really scary 2020 data”.

“Because it’s not just the opioid use itself, it’s not just the use of that prescription or that opioid,” she said. “But it’s also the stress that came with COVID, the stress, the inability to maintain those close relationships, or even go to recovery and support services or get the treatment they needed. Even if it was virtual, it wasn’t available to everyone. “

However, Murza also noted that she was “positive” about the work of the HEART initiative in Utah County and said she looked forward to continuing education and preventing opioid abuse.

“I know the work is there, the work is definitely there,” she said. “So it will take some time.”

Commissioner Bill Lee noted that Utah officials have made efforts in recent years to combat and prevent opioid abuse in the state.

“We made a significant effort to educate people at this level a few years ago, getting our hospitals, doctors and dentists, and others to shop and find ways to help, especially on the prescription opioid side,” Lee said .

During the working session on Wednesday, 4-H Mentoring Coordinator Brandon Summers told the commission that the youth program, which is targeting young people aged 9-15 who are “considered at greater risk”, “has been in recent decades significantly expanded “.

Summers said most of the mentors in the program are college-age students who “act as a big brother or sister to these kids and role models and someone they can rely on, as many of these children come from very difficult circumstances. ”

The program received two federal grants from the Justice Department’s Office of Juvenile Justice and Crime Prevention, which according to Summers, equates to approximately $ 1.2 million in funding over the next three years.

The post Opioid abuse up during pandemic, expert tells Utah County first appeared on Daily Utahan.

Category: Provo
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Tippmann Cronus Paintball Gun review
Sun, 20 Jun 2021 18:15:48 GMT
Tippmann Cronus Review

Bottom Line: If you’re looking for a paintball marker that is fun, easy to use, and tough enough to tackle even the toughest days (or weather conditions) you will find the Tippman Cronus a fantastic choice. The Tippmann Cronus is an updated version of the Tippmann 98 model that has proven itself for 30 years in terms of reliability and ease of use. The Tippmann 98 was the industry standard for renting paintball fields for decades as it was a workhorse. The Cronus is a refresh of the 98 with some ergonomic improvements and the addition of accessory rails for more customization.

Related Post: Best Paintball Guns

Features of the Tippmann Cronus

The Tippmann Cronus has some impressive features for a beginner-friendly paintball marker. These functions can be upgraded individually or simultaneously with the Tippmann Cronus tactic. The following are features of the Tippmann Cronus;

68 caliber Cronus PowerPack paintball gun kit Black & Tan Dessert Op Tactical Exterior Open bolt strike back 9.5 inch shaft length stock 3. 7 pounds of weight Internal gas line CO2 and HPA air capability Mechanical trigger Impact-resistant composite body Vertical handle for improved grip Fixed front and rear sights 4 Picatinny rails for accessories Valor glasses and 200-round loader Tippmann Cronus rating Adaptation and reliability are at the heart of the Tippmann Cronus

One of the great main features of Tippman Cronus is the ability to customize the paintball marker. It’s one of the most customizable paintball markers on the market today. Most beginner markers are non-modifiable and limited, forcing players to upgrade to a better weapon. It contains several rails, no less than four rails, allows a variety of fastenings.

There is also an option for further modifications, with a level upgrade to the tactical edition being possible. It’s very popular which makes the upgrades easy to find. This is where the tip man Cronus becomes valuable. Any paintball player can use it for a long time without getting bored. It’s easy to turn it into any weapon you want.

quality

Tippman has been making high quality guns since 1986. You can therefore rely on a high quality product with the Tippmann Cronus. It’s one of the best paintball guns out there.

Tippmann Cronus rating

Shooting accuracy

This paintball gun has a firing mechanism that can work in all conditions. One of the many standout features of this paintball gun is a ported barrel. This makes the shots quieter and more accurate. There are also four Picatinny rails that can be used to add attachments. This also improves the accuracy of the shot.

speed

The Tippmann Cronus has been proven to fire at rapid speeds of up to eight balls per second. It has a semi-automatic shooting mode that can accurately hit targets with a range of up to 50 meters. A mechanical trigger is also built into this beginner rifle that allows for fast firing speeds and accuracy of 50 feet.

Use and maintenance

Tippmann Cronus pistol is very easy to use and perfect for beginners in paintball. It doesn’t have any technical details that other paintball guns have. While it’s a great choice for beginners, experienced players can use it as well. Cleaning the weapon is also very easy.

price

The fact is that the Cronus paintball marker is relatively cheap compared to other paintball markers on the market. Despite its affordability, there are some advanced features that you can enjoy. However, if you have more money to spend, the Tippmann Cronus Tactical Edition will reward you with improved skills and room for improvement

design

The Tippmann Cronus pistol has a great design and a very durable material, which makes the weapon look professional and stylish. The Black & Tan Dessert Op outer housing of the Cronus marker is also authentic, with realistic details and color aesthetics that impress with the paintball guns.

It has a vertical and rubberized handle that makes it easier to fire the gun, especially during the rainy season. The rubber grips also make it easy to carry. It’s also reasonably easy. Regardless of the style of shooting or the speed of fire, the design of this marker has never proven difficult. The barrel design minimizes the noise of the shot, making it a good option for players who value stealth.

The Tippmann Cronus Tactical Edition upgrade version

The Tippmann Cronus Tactical Edition is another alternative for everyone who wants to upgrade because of the already installed upgrades. The two guns are similar, so they are both semi-automatic and give a smooth shot. All of the basic functionality of Cronus can be found here, but there are other additional features like a laser sight. With this Tippmann Cronus Tactical Edition, for example, an additional handle is mounted that can be easily added or removed. Other features and portions of the Cronus Tactical Edition include;

There is a collapsible stock on the back of the weapon. It helps in easier modification of the weapon for different environment and gameplay. It also makes cleaning and maintenance easier. A rail with a shield is attached to the top of the weapon, to the bottom and also to the sides of the weapon. Another warehouse run, the A5, is an upgrade. A running cuff for storage. A kit contains replacement O-rings, lubricant, and Allen keys to help you attach and remove accessories.

For advanced modification and maintenance, you may need a selection of Allen keys that can be used to attach all kinds of attachments and accessories to your Tippmann marker.

Conclusion

If you are new to the game of paintball, the Tippmann Cronus pistol is definitely a great choice for you. This is a popular choice of paintball gun that is designed for beginners and gives you the best user experience.

frequently asked Questions Can the Tippmann use Cronus compressed air?

Yes, a Tippmann Cronus shoots more evenly with compressed air. The Cronus works with both CO2 and HPA. However, it is recommended that you play the game using HPA for a more consistent pace.

How do you use Tippmann Cronus?

The Tippmann Cronus has proven to be one of the easiest to use paintball guns on the market today. To fire the paintball gun, you need to follow the steps below;

Install the barrel barrel and customize the paintball marker Charge the gun with air, the barrel locking device, etc. Put on your safety glasses / eye protection Point the marker in a safe direction. Remove the barrel locking device from the marker. Make sure the marker is cocked, the gas is on, and paintballs are loaded. Switch the Trigger Safety from Safe Mode to Fire Mode. Pull the trigger to fire the marker. How do I clean my Tippmann Cronus?

To clean the exterior of your Tippmann Cronus marker, you must wipe off paint, grease and dirt with a damp cloth.

To clean the inside of the gun, pull back on the rear bolt handle. Press and twist the label at the end of the squeegee at the angle of insertion until it comes out of the end of the shaft tube. Pull the wiper to clean it. Remove the barrel and use the squeegee to remove debris.

The post Tippmann Cronus Paintball Gun review first appeared on America's Firearms Newsource.

Category: Gun Reviews
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Encircle’s plans for the LGBTQ facility in Ogden are getting support, say supporters | Local news
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 01:51:49 GMT
Encircle's plans for the LGBTQ facility in Ogden are getting support, say supporters |  Local news

OGDEN – When her son first turned out to be gay with her, Kathryn Hueth didn’t know where to turn.

She did not tell her husband and followed her son’s wishes. It was the mid-2000s and there were no organizations in Ogden to support them. “There was absolutely nothing. … I was only ultimately alone for 10 years or so, ”she said as her son went through the subject.

Things have stabilized since then – her son got married and thrived, she said. Even so, she knows that others face the uncertainty and fear that has caused her and her son, and as Chair of the Ogden Encircle Advisory Board, her mission is to do whatever it takes to help the LGBTQ community. “I want everyone to lead a beautiful, fulfilling life. That’s the end point of all of this, “she said.

To that end, she shared her story on Thursday at an event aimed at spreading the news of Encircle that it will build a facility in Ogden that will serve as a refuge and resource center for the LGBTQ community. Circle leaders soliciting financial assistance took part in the construction of the proposed facility at 2458 Washington Blvd. emerges. It has raised around $ 320,000 so far, said Stephenie Larsen, CEO of Encircle, and Hueth said the response from the Ogden area has been positive since the Encircle plans emerged here.



A Gay Pride flag hangs in front of the Eccles Art Center in Ogden. Encircle representatives spoke outside the facility on Thursday, June 17, 2021 about plans to build an Encircle facility in the city that caters to the LGBTQ community.


“All’s well. It’s phenomenal. … People were passionate about getting fully involved,” Hueth said. Encircle officials broke ground on Washington Boulevard in late March last year, and Larsen, who also spoke on Thursday, hopes work on the red-brick facility can begin in earnest next month, with a preliminary completion date in spring 2022.

Around 100 people attended the Meet Encircle event in front of the Eccles Art Center in Ogden on Thursday, including Rep. Rosemary Lesser of Utah, Jim Harvey, Commissioner for Weber County and Marcia White, Councilor for Ogden. Encircle, a nonprofit founded in 2017, currently has facilities in Provo, Salt Lake City, and St. George.

Encircle’s offers are aimed at the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning community and their family members, with the focus on Thursday on the planned offers here.

“We all have stories and by sharing those stories we connect with each other,” said Hueth. Encircle is a place where the personal stories of the LGBTQ community can be told, she continued, serving as a “lifeline” for them.

More broadly, Larsen said that encircle facilities are intended to be safe spaces for the LGBTQ community, providing a place where they can get support and therapy, make friends, and more. “You walk into an encircle house and it’s laughter, happiness. … It is built by the community for the community. I think this love – you can feel it in the walls of the houses, ”she said.



Circle 01.jpg

Stephenie Larsen speaks outside Eccles Art Center in Ogden on Thursday June 17, 2021 about plans to build an Encircle facility in the city that caters to the LGBTQ community. Larsen is the CEO of Encircle.


Taylor Knuth, a member of the Ogden Encircle Advisory Board, spoke about his coming out. Growing up with no institution like Encircle to turn to, he suspected that life “would have been filled with a little more camaraderie and fellowship” had such an organization existed.

Encircle received a series of high-profile donations worth $ 4 million earlier this year from Apple, the Cupertino, Calif.-Based technology company; Utah Jazz owners Ryan and Ashley Smith; and Imagine Dragons frontman Dan Reynolds. This money will help build the Ogden facility and others.

The post Encircle's plans for the LGBTQ facility in Ogden are getting support, say supporters | Local news first appeared on Daily Utahan.

Category: Ogden
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No rest for Utah Jazz Olympians
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 02:05:35 GMT
No rest for Utah Jazz Olympians

SALT LAKE CITY (ABC4 Sports) – Less than 12 hours after the heartbreaking end of the NBA season, Joe Ingles received a message from the Australian national team.

“I just got a text message from the assistant coach,” Ingles said during his media availability.

Ingles is a regular with the Boomers, as the Australians are called, and plans to compete in the Tokyo Olympics next month.

He says getting back on the pitch will help ease the sting about the end of the season for jazz.

“It’s hard to think about the boomer stuff right now,” Ingles. “I just want to take a step back and enjoy these few days with the kids. I’ll be home for about six days over the next seven weeks, or something like that. When I get there on the 24th, I think that will change a little because that way I will focus on the goal of winning a gold medal. So I’ll start focusing on that. I think that will help not to have to think about jazz things a lot. “

Jazz coping with great disappointment goes into the off-season

Rudy Gobert will try to lead France to their first ever Olympic gold medal, which in his opinion will only help their game.

“It’s a great goal that we have as a team to win a medal in the Olympics,” said Gobert. “For me, it will be another great opportunity for me to keep getting better and try to achieve something great at the same time.”

Bojan Bogdanovic has also signed up to play for the Croatian international in Tokyo. Both Donovan Mitchell and Mike Conley are in the US pool of Olympic hopefuls. Mitchell didn’t say what he was up to. But Conley said, despite his hamstring strain that limited him in the playoffs, if he’s selected, he wants to play.

“Absolutely,” said Conley. “If I manage to say my name or at some point be called to be part of this team, I will definitely be ready to accept it.”

As supportive as the jazz organization supports their boys at the Olympic Games, there are legitimate concerns about injuries, especially after a shortened season.

The Jazz season ends with a devastating loss to Clippers in Game 6, 131-119

“I’m not trying to hypocritically say that I don’t want them to attend,” said Dennis Lindsey, executive vice president of basketball operations. “But there is no question that we all hold our breath, that nothing happens. There’s no general manager or head coach in the league who can’t say he’s holding his breath. “

“The guys we have play in their national teams and they are really proud of that,” said head coach Quin Snyder. “I know how important this is to them, and above all, I want to wish them the best of luck because I know how passionate they are.”

The Summer Olympics begin on July 23rd and last until August 8th.

The post No rest for Utah Jazz Olympians first appeared on Daily Utahan.

Category: Salt Lake City
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'Very uncomfortable': Biden-Putin photo op gets awkward
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 09:47:00 GMT




CNN anchors react to the photo op with President Biden and President Putin as they begin their meeting in Geneva.

#WolfBlitzer #CNN #News

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Pliny of the Plains: Marciano Aguayo and a Life Time of Letters
Tue, 19 Jan 2021 10:50:13 GMT

Marciano Aguayo as shown on his matrícula consular on July 23, 1929.

Each year, the Denver Public Library receives donations that become part of its Western History and Genealogy collection. In 2008, José Aguayo donated his family papers, aptly named the Aguayo Family Papers (C MSS WH2035), which are organized into three series:

Museo de las Américas personal papers of José Aguayo personal papers of Marciano Aguayo, his father

A handwritten letter by Marciano Aguayo asking Union Pacific to recall him to work.

Marciano Aguayo was born circa 1903 in Aguascalientes, Mexico. Around 1917, he followed his older brother Ciriaco to the U.S. and settled in Sedgwick, Colorado, by 1925. He married Jovita Ortega of Chihuahua, Mexico, in 1929, and together they had six children. His younger sister, Daria, remained in Aguascalientes.

In the collection, Marciano’s legacy is highlighted by the correspondence he left behind addressing both professional and personal matters. While few of Marciano’s outgoing letters survive, the collection contains dozens of letters addressed to him from 1925 to 1966.

A letter copied to Marciano Aguayo from the Consulate of Mexico in Denver regarding labor disputes with a Great Western Sugar Company supervisor.

The bulk of letters were received from the Consulate of Mexico in Denver. Written in Spanish between 1925 and 1944, they document the hard life that Marciano, his family, and fellow Mexicans experienced in rural northeastern Colorado. The letters addressed unfair labor practices, lost wages, mistreatment, and discrimination he and his fellow Mexican braceros encountered while working for The Great Western Sugar Company (C MSS WH1227) and the Union Pacific Railroad Company. Letters from the Railroad Retirement Board and Brotherhood of Maintenance of Way Employees deal with transfers, force reductions, wage issues, displacement from seniority lists, and being called back to work.

A letter from Union Pacific vice president P.J. Lynch commending Marciano Aguayo for his heroic actions and awarding him a $50 savings bond.

Marciano received a letter of congratulations and a $50 savings bond from a Union Pacific vice president when he observed a hotbox on a train and helped stop it. A hotbox is when a railroad car’s axle bearing overheats by friction The town newspaper also featured a story about his actions. Every few years Marciano also registered for a matrícula consular, or Mexican consulate ID, for himself and his family through the mail.

At a time when illiteracy was high among migrant workers, Marciano wrote letters on behalf of fellow Mexicans. He advocated for better wages and informed the consulate of missing persons, deaths, and asked about repatriation rights to Mexico. His inquiries were timely and addressed real-life concerns in 1920s and 1930s U.S. immigration laws, the risk of deportation, and if foreign nationals could be drafted into World War II military service.

A letter in Spanish addressed to Marciano Aguayo with subscription prices for his hometown newspaper in Mexico. In the last paragraph he is asked to write back with stories about migrant work life in the U.S.

A fair amount of Marciano’s Spanish correspondence was with friends and family in Mexico and the U.S. He corresponded with Daria in Aguascalientes and Ciriaco who went missing for a time, and was later discovered to be living in California. He regularly bought books, newspapers, magazines, and planners from Mexico and became pen pals with the woman who processed his orders by mail. Some of his English correspondence includes nasty letters from a doctor collecting unpaid medical bills, a wristwatch purchase, a Singer sewing machine on a payment plan, and letters from a son in prison.

A few poems Marciano penned also survive, mostly from a Mexican civic celebration and parade in Sedgwick he and his brother organized in 1929. The civic celebrations were funded by dances held throughout the year as fundraisers. The dances were a way for Mexicans to meet one another in northeastern Colorado, and Marciano met his future wife Jovita at one such dance.

A letter from the Consulate of Mexico in Denver outlining the procedures to establish a Comisión Honorífica Mexicana (Honorary Mexican Commission) in Sedgwick in response to the number of Mexicans in northestern Colorado.

In 1934, Marciano was tasked with forming a chapter of the Comisión Honorífica Mexicana, or Honorary Mexican Commission, in Sedgwick. This was a type of honorary consulate and mutual aid society officially sponsored by the Consulate of Mexico in Denver and Mexican federal government. Funds raised benefited members by defraying funeral costs, hospital bills, repatriations, and other expenses in a time and place where few other support systems existed for Mexicans.

In addition to letters, the collection offers additional artifacts, photographs, memorabilia, and primary sources of interest to researchers, genealogists, students, and scholars. More information on the collection is available in the bilingual finding aid [insert link to finding aid]. Access to the Aguayo Family Papers is open to anybody who would like to consult the collection. No appointment is necessary, however, researchers should note that documents are in both English and Spanish.

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Rochelle Park Officer finds couple with a loaded gun at traffic control
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 05:34:26 GMT
Rochelle Park Officer finds couple with a loaded gun at traffic control

A police officer in Rochelle Park found a couple with a loaded gun at a traffic stop on Tuesday, authorities said.

Officer Franklin Laboy stopped a tinted Nissan Sentra on West Passaic Street and found the 9mm SCCY CPX Hangun under the passenger seat, Lt. James DePreta.

Laboy called in reinforcements and arrested driver Jamal Mattiex from Paterson and Monasia Coleman from Rembert, SC, both 18.

Everyone was charged with gun crimes and taken to the Bergen District Prison to await their first appearance in the Hackensack Central Court.

Assistants were Sgt. Chris Bermudez, the detectives Brian Cobb and Brian Gallina and Officer Brian Monico.

The weapon is being examined to see if it may have been used for a crime.

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The post Rochelle Park Officer finds couple with a loaded gun at traffic control first appeared on America's Firearms Newsource.

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New York lifts pandemic restrictions
Sun, 20 Jun 2021 13:17:28 GMT

Subjects ” General neurology

HealthDay News – New York state reached a milestone in which 70 percent of its residents received at least one COVID-19 vaccine dose, and partnered with California on Tuesday to lift many pandemic restrictions.

The COVID-19 positivity rate in New York rose to 48.2 percent, making it the highest in the world at a time. But the rate is now 0.4 percent, the lowest rate in the United States, according to Johns Hopkins University, CNN reported.

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo announced an immediate end to governmental restrictions in all commercial and social settings, CNN reported. Mask requirements remain in place in Pre-K, public transit and healthcare, Cuomo said.

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California and New York have the highest COVID-19 deaths in the United States (more than 63,000 and 53,000 respectively), CNN reported. On Tuesday, COVID-19 deaths in the U.S. topped 600,000.

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Final Lead Plaintiff Deadline Approaching in the Skillz Inc. f/k/a Flying Eagle Acquisition Corp. Class Action Lawsuit
Sun, 20 Jun 2021 12:49:10 GMT

SAN DIEGO–(BUSINESS WIRE) – Robbins Geller Rudman & Dowd LLP announces that Skillz Inc. f / k / a Flying Eagle Acquisition Corp. (NYSE: SKLZ) between December 16, 2020 and April 19, 2021 (the “Class Period”) through July 7, 2021 to seek appointment as the lead plaintiff in the Skillz class action, Jedrzejczyk v. Skillz Inc. f / k / a Flying Eagle Acquisition Corp., No. 21-cv-03450 (ND Cal.), I.e. assigned to Richard G. Seeborg.

The Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 allows any investor who purchased Skillz securities during the class action period to seek appointment as the lead plaintiff in the Skillz class action. A lead plaintiff is usually the applicant with the greatest financial interest in the legal protection sought by the alleged class, which is also typical and appropriate for the alleged class. A lead plaintiff is acting on behalf of all the other group members in leading the Skillz class action. The lead plaintiff can choose a law firm of their choice to bring the Skillz class action lawsuit. An investor’s ability to participate in a possible future recovery of the Skillz lawsuit does not depend on being the lead plaintiff. If you would like to stand as the lead plaintiff in the Skillz class action or have any questions about your rights in relation to the Skillz class action, please complete your information here or contact attorney JC Sanchez of Robbins Geller at 800 / 449-4900 or 619 / 231-1058 or by email to jsanchez@rgrdlaw.com. Lead plaintiffs’ motions for the Skillz class action must be filed with the court no later than July 7, 2021.

Flying Eagle Acquisition Corp. (“FEAC”) was founded in early January 2020 as a Special Purpose Acquisition Company (SPAC). Within eight months, FEAC secured a $ 158 million private placement in connection with a business combination between FEAC and its target company – Skillz. FEAC and Skillz completed their merger on December 16, 2020 and valued Skillz at $ 3.5 billion.

The Skillz class action alleges that during the class action period, defendants made materially misleading statements and omissions, including representations relating to certain business transactions, performance metrics, and final evaluation of Skillz, including but not limited to: (i) Skillz’s ability to attract new end users, ( ii) future profitability, (iii) the dwindling popularity of Skillz’s hosted games, which accounted for 88% of sales, and (iv) Skillz’s valuation. The Skillz class action lawsuit also alleges that one of Skillz’s objectively unrealistic promises included the untenable claim that Skillz was worth $ 3.5 billion, based on sales projections of more than $ 550 million for 2022. Skillz however, it allegedly failed to inform investors that game downloads, which make up a large portion of Skillz’s revenue, have been in decline since at least November 2020.

In March 2021, Wolfpack Research published a report entitled: “SKLZ: It Takes Little Skill to See this SPACtacular Disaster Coming,” claiming, among other things, that the growth speculations that Skillz and its insiders had touted were “totally unrealistic” . In particular, the Wolfpack Research report claimed, among other things, that the three games that Skillz relies on for 88% of its sales had already started to decline before Skillz went public. Wolfpack Research’s report concluded that Skillz has buried that decline in downloads and revenue in its disclosures while continuing to herald massive future revenue growth. Because of this news, Skillz’s stock fell nearly 11%.

Then, on April 19, 2021, Eagle Eye Research posted an anonymous report on Twitter claiming that Skillz is “likely to generate significant income in kind and by providing bonus payments to users. . . Cash receipts can make up less than half of GAAP revenues. ”With this news, Skillz stock fell another 6%, causing further damage to investors.

Robbins Geller Rudman & Dowd LLP has started a special SPAC task force to protect investors in blank check companies and seek redress for corporate misconduct. The SPAC Task Force consists of experienced litigation attorneys, investigators and forensic accountants and is dedicated to detecting and prosecuting fraud on behalf of aggrieved SPAC investors. The rise in blank check funding poses unique risks for investors. Robbins Geller Rudman & Dowd LLP’s SPAC Task Force represents the vanguard in ensuring integrity, honesty and equity in this rapidly evolving area of ​​investment.

With 200 attorneys in 9 offices across the country, Robbins Geller Rudman & Dowd LLP is the largest US law firm serving investors in securities class actions. Robbins Geller’s attorneys have secured many of the largest shareholder reclaims in history, including the largest securities class action of all time – $ 7.2 billion – in In re Enron Corp. Sec. Lit. The 2020 ISS Securities Class Action Services Top 50 Report ranked Robbins Geller first for getting $ 1.6 billion back for investors last year, more than double the amount paid by any other securities plaintiff firm was drafted. More information is available at http://www.rgrdlaw.com.

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The post Final Lead Plaintiff Deadline Approaching in the Skillz Inc. f/k/a Flying Eagle Acquisition Corp. Class Action Lawsuit first appeared on DAILY LEGAL PRESS.

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Progress Made in Vienna at Iran Nuclear Talks
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 07:01:37 GMT
Progress Made in Vienna at Iran Nuclear Talks

VIENNA (AP) – Top diplomats say that further progress has been made in the talks between Iran and the world powers in an attempt to negotiate and restore a groundbreaking agreement from 2015 to curb Iran’s nuclear development, which was later adopted by the Trump administration was abandoned.

You said on Sunday that it is now up to the governments involved in the negotiations to make political decisions.

It was the first official meeting since the Iranian justice chief’s landslide victory in the presidential election last week.

Some diplomats have expressed concerns that the election of Iran’s new President Ebrahim Raisi could make a possible return to the deal more difficult.

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The post Progress Made in Vienna at Iran Nuclear Talks first appeared on Daily Wyoming Cowboy.

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Idea of expanded historic district gets chilly reception | Local News
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 04:48:20 GMT
Idea of expanded historic district gets chilly reception | Local News

LACONIA – A proposal to place the entire downtown area in the city’s historic district was received with concern by city councils, who expressed concern that such a move could slow the momentum of the area’s revitalization.

The Chair of the Historic District Commission, Tara Shore, outlined the plan to expand the area to nine city blocks roughly bounded by Church Street, Veterans Square, the railroad tracks to the intersection of Water Street and the Winnipesaukee River.

The expanded district would be an asset to the city, Shore said, and would fuel the downtown revitalization momentum fueled by the multimillion-dollar restoration of the Colonial Theater.

“Our heritage and our history tell the story of our city,” she told the council.

The area to be added to the borough includes nine of the city’s 15 buildings listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

City councils said Monday they were concerned that changes could complicate plans to convert the former Holy Trinity School into apartments, in addition to the prospect of redeveloping one of the largest business blocks on Main Street.

“We are not here to create trouble on anyone,” Shore assured the council. She noted that the process a building owner or developer would go through with the Historic District Commission could happen simultaneously with submitting her proposal to the planning committee.

Councilor Bob Hamel said he was concerned that the expansion could create difficulties for owners looking to modernize their buildings. He also said he did not endorse the proposal as it would include buildings that are not historic.

Bree Neal, whose polished and tidy hair salon is on Main Street in one of the buildings that would fall into the expanded district, said she was against the plan because she saw the vagueness of the regulations for the historic district.

“The regulation is completely subjective,” she said.

But Charlie St. Clair, who owns and operates the Laconia Antique Center on Main Street, defended the area’s expansion.

“This is our chance to preserve these buildings,” he said.

Council Henry Lipman called for the Council, after the mandatory public hearing, to reject the proposal and then assist in drawing up a plan that balances the interests of conservationists and building owners or developers.

“We need more specifics about what they can and can’t do,” said Councilor Bruce Cheney.

The council unanimously voted for Lipman’s idea and scheduled a public hearing for Monday June 28th.

KNM Holdings recently purchased the vacant Holy Trinity building from the city for $ 1 and plans to convert it into apartments.

Another development potential that the local council is looking at on Monday is the Pemaco building at 622-634 Main Street. The building, which went up for sale for $ 1,050,000, is now under contract, according to realtor REMAX Bayside’s website. The 95-year-old, three-story building includes a 12,000 square meter theater with a wraparound balcony.

When presenting the planned expansion of the district to the planning committee last month, the deputy chairman of the historic district commission, Karl Reitz, cited several examples that, in his opinion, showed that the residents of Laconia recognize the importance of monument preservation: the renovation of the colonial theater, the Belknap Mill and the Lakeport Opera House; Opposition to the possible demolition of St. Joseph Church and a historic home on Lakeside Avenue in Weirs Beach; and the shared concern for the future of the Gardens Theater and the Masonic Temple.

The post Idea of expanded historic district gets chilly reception | Local News first appeared on REALESTATE NEWS24.

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Winston-Salem, NC – Moenasha Littlejohn was injured in an accident on Mock St. – Raleigh Personal Injury Blog – June 20, 2021
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 06:05:43 GMT
Raleigh, NC - One Killed, One Hurt Following Car Accident on I-440

Winston-Salem, NC (June 20, 2021) – A Winston-Salem woman was injured in a two car crash in the city on Thursday June 17. The accident occurred on Mock Street near Eller Way around 4:30 p.m.

According to Officer BT Smith of the Winston-Salem Police Department, Moenasha Littlejohn was walking down Mock Street when she arrived at a stop sign. At the stop sign, her car was hit by a vehicle driven by Tommy Lee Williams from Winston-Salem. Littlejohn sustained unknown injuries in the crash and was taken to the Baptist Hospital by Life Star EMS. Williams was not injured in the collision.

Following an investigation, Officer Smith accused Williams of driving while his license was revoked. No further information was released at this point.

The crash investigations are ongoing.

Our thoughts and best wishes go to Moenasha Littlejohn after this car accident in Winston-Salem. We hope for a full and speedy recovery.

Car accidents in North Carolina

A car accident in North Carolina can be a truly life changing event for victims. If you’ve been injured in an accident, you likely have questions about your future. During this time, it’s normal to wonder if you can pay your medical bills, if you can support yourself and your family, and if your life will ever return to what you saw before the accident. Anyone who has been involved in an accident with injuries is likely to experience a sense of fear or discomfort about their future.

Nearly 300,000 traffic accidents were reported in our state last year. Of this number, slightly more than 80,000 suffered minor to severe injuries or even death. After a North Carolina car accident, you should seek help from a qualified North Carolina car accident attorney. Your attorney can help you take the right steps and can also help you relieve much of your stress and uncertainty.

At Burton Law Firm, North Carolina auto accident attorney Jason M. Burton has served clients in Raleigh and across the Triangle for more than eight years. We pride ourselves on helping people obtain justice when they have been wrongly harmed by the reckless and negligent actions of others. We know that every customer’s case is the most important thing they deal with, and we treat each case as if it were our own. This approach has enabled us to achieve successful results in a wide variety of situations and, more importantly, have injured victims receive the compensation they deserve.

We are always at your side with words and deeds. If you need a lawyer who has your back and is not afraid to stand up for your rights, we can help you. Our vetted and trusted attorneys make sure you get the compensation you need and deserve. To schedule an appointment with a member of our team, please contact us using the link on our website or call us at (833) 623-0042.

NoExtract: Burton Law Firm uses a variety of external sources in compiling these accident reports. These sources include news broadcasts, police reports, first hand reports, news reports, as well as additional external sources. As a result, the details of this accident have not been independently verified by our office or typists. If you find incorrect information about an accident that we have written about, please contact our law firm as soon as possible so that we can correct the information immediately. If you would prefer us to remove the story, contact us directly and we will endeavor to remove the story in a timely manner.

Disclaimer: Our team of personal injury attorneys at Burton Law Firm pride themselves on having been active members of our local business community for more than 8 years. We are constantly striving to improve the quality of life of our community members and to improve the general safety and wellbeing of all North Carolinians. We hope that by providing this information we will raise awareness about the dangers of driving and encourage drivers to exercise increased caution when driving. Our thoughts go out to anyone who may be affected by this incident. This post is not an advertisement for companies. None of the information in this post should be misunderstood as medical or legal advice. The photos in this post are not a representation of the actual accident site.

The post Winston-Salem, NC - Moenasha Littlejohn was injured in an accident on Mock St. - Raleigh Personal Injury Blog - June 20, 2021 first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

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Severe thunderstorm alerts for all of Southeast Michigan
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 03:13:43 GMT
Severe thunderstorm alerts for all of Southeast Michigan

DETROIT – Happy Father’s Day and welcome to Sunday Motown!

The National Weather Service has issued a thunderstorm warning for Oakland County until 11:30 p.m. and Lenawee until 11:45 p.m., and a thunderstorm warning for Genesee, Lapeer, Lenawee, Livingston, Macomb, Monroe, Oakland, St. Clair, Washtenaw, and Wayne counties until 1 am

Two rounds of showers and thunderstorms will hit the Detroit area tonight and tonight. The best place is indoors when it is raining, lightning, wind whips and hail are striking. The weather won’t be so wild until dawn, but tomorrow there will be isolated rain and storms. It stays warm tonight and tomorrow with more refreshing air arriving mid-week.

The first wave of showers and thunderstorms comes between 8:00 PM and 9:00 PM ET. The second round arrives around 10:00 p.m. ET. Temperatures will be near 80 ° F or in the rain chilly 70’s.

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Heavy rains can lead to flash floods and congestion on roads. Lightning is always dangerous and people need to stay out of the open field, stand under trees, and stay away from metal objects and equipment.

Harmful wind with a potential speed of 60 or 70 miles per hour or more can topple branches and trees or cause structural damage. Large hail, possibly the size of golf balls or tennis balls, can cause personal injury and property damage.

Tonight we say goodbye to the astronomical spring and welcome the astronomical summer. The summer solstice is at 11:31 pm

The evening storms are round one. Round 2 of the thunderstorm arrives Sunday night after 10:00 PM ET. Showers and thunderstorms forming in western and northern Indiana will sweep through our region.

Monday gets wet in the morning with showers and thunderstorms leaving for breakfast. The afternoon is partly sunny with a few showers and storms. It gets warm with highs around 80 ° F.

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Tuesday and Wednesday will be refreshing with blue skies and lots of dry air. We can ventilate our homes as afternoon temperatures hit 70 ° F on Tuesday and the upper 70’s on Wednesday.

Thursday will be warmer with mostly sunny skies. It’ll be in the lower 80’s.

It will be sultry Friday and Saturday with highs in the mid-80s. With more unstable air and a new frontal system on the way, showers and thunderstorms are possible every day.

Sea forecast

Lake Erie

Sunday: Mostly sunny, a few showers. Wind: N 5-10 knots; Waves: 0 to 2 feet. Water temperature: 71 degrees.

Lake St. Clair

Sunday: Mostly sunny, a few showers. Wind: S 5-10 knots; Waves: 0 to 2 feet. Water temperature: 67 degrees.

Lake Huron

Sunday: Mostly sunny, a few showers. Wind: WNW 5-10 knots; Waves: 0 to 2 feet. Water temperature: 67 degrees.

Make sure to download the FREE Local4Casters weather app – it’s for sure one of the best in the country. Just search your App Store under WDIV and it will be available for iPhones and Androids! Or click the appropriate link below.

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· Download for iPhone

· Download for Android

Copyright 2021 by WDIV ClickOnDetroit – All rights reserved.

The post Severe thunderstorm alerts for all of Southeast Michigan first appeared on Wolverine State Watch.

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San Francisco’s Inaugural Metropolis EMT Graduate Faculty, program for younger folks of colour that creates upward mobility and profession progress
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 08:52:12 GMT
San Francisco's Inaugural City EMT Graduate School, program for young people of color that creates upward mobility and career growth

SAN FRANCISCO (KGO) – After four months of training, the opening class of the City EMT pilot program has been completed.

The first class started with 15 students and 13 completed the intensive training program that prepared young colored people for the job of paramedic or fire brigade.

“We just want them to know you can. Let us show you how to do it. Let us help you and provide the curriculum to help you get to this step, ”said Attic Bowden, who founded the program.

Bowden, a chief of the fire department for the San Francisco Fire Department, founded the nonprofit with the aim of providing young adults from underserved parts of San Francisco with hands-on training and a life-changing path to stable, well-being to Black, Latinx, and Asia-Pacific islanders paid career.

“It’s been a journey,” said Mikel Gregory, one of the graduates.

RELATED: Celebrity Activists, Allies Consider How ‘Black Freedom’ Works For Them Before Juneteenth. looks like

Gregory was born and raised in the Bayview-Hunters Point neighborhood.

The pilot program started earlier this year and is funded by the Office of Workforce Development Opportunities For All initiative in San Francisco.

The initiative is one of Mayor London Breed’s premier programs for youth in the city aged 13 to 24.

“I wanted to make sure we had a program that not only gave kids experience and incredible opportunities, but that money wasn’t an obstacle to their success,” said Mayor Breed.

Not only was the training free, but each student received a $ 3,000 monthly scholarship as part of a pilot guaranteed income program so they wouldn’t have to worry about how they made ends meet while studying.

“The scholarship made sure I didn’t revert to that whole survival mindset,” said Fernando Cervantes, a graduate of the program.

WATCH: Our America: Black Freedom | Watch the whole episode

Cervantes hopes to find a job with the fire department with his EMT certification.

The Chances for All initiative also helps young adults from marginalized groups to secure practical training in the film industry.

“I feel like these opportunities really humbled me because it’s crazy to see Don Johnson and Cheech all the time,” said Phil Elleston.

The 20-year-old native of San Francisco was able to secure an internship on the set of the reboot of the ’90s dramedy “Nash Bridges,” which was filmed in town this spring with Don Johnson and Cheer Marin.

RELATED: The Bay Area School District is battling learning losses among black students and low-income households

Elleston worked in the lighting department for the show and also received an internship while working on “Matrix 4,” which was filmed in San Francisco in 2020.

“It was overwhelming. I would like to keep doing projects that really appeal to me,” he said.

The Office of Workforce Development recently approved $ 1 million in funding for City EMT to add another four cohorts to the program over the next two years.

The money comes from Mayor Breed’s Dream Keeper Initiative, which aims to improve outcomes for black residents in the city.

The initiative will receive $ 120 million in funding over the next two years, with funds being sold from the San Francisco Police Department budget.

RELATED: Bay Area Students Torn About ‘Zoom U’ As Universities Restart With Online Tuition

Of the $ 60 million allocated for fiscal 2020-21, $ 4.8 million is for urban employment pipelines, $ 6 million for workforce training and development, and $ 7 million for guaranteed Income provided.

For young people like Gregory, the initiative creates a path to economic freedom for the next generation.

“I’ll go and tell the world. I can tell my coworkers, tell the people at Bayview-Hunters Point and show them that you can be black, you can have the experience of going to public schools and still being able to achieve, “said Gregory.

City EMT is modeled after EMS Corp, a similar program in the Bay in Alameda County.

More information about the City EMT program can be found here. And for information on Opportunities for All, click here.

Copyright © 2021 KGO-TV. All rights reserved.

The post San Francisco's Inaugural Metropolis EMT Graduate Faculty, program for younger folks of colour that creates upward mobility and profession progress first appeared on DAILY CALIFORNIA PRESS.

Category: San Francisco
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Oil Prices Reach 2-Year High. Is $200 Oil Next?
Mon, 14 Jun 2021 22:25:26 GMT

The price of crude oil has increased by more than 15% since April, as a faster-than-expected economic recovery in the U.S. and abroad is forecast to bolster energy demand.

Last week, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) raised its 2021 prediction for petroleum and other liquid fuel consumption in the U.S. to 1.49 million barrels per day. This represents a 7% increase from the EIA’s previous 2021 forecast of 1.39 million bpd.

Meanwhile, fresh OPEC supply concerns have now taken crude prices to over $70 per barrel — a two-and-a-half-year high.

Responding to a recent International Energy Agency (IEA) report, which suggested there is no longer a need to invest in new oil and gas projects if the world’s goal is to reach net-zero emissions by 2050, energy leaders from Saudi Arabia and Russia are warning divestment in oil and gas will contribute to the supply crunch.

According to S&P Global Platts, an official OPEC report read, “The claim that no new oil and gas investments are needed post-2021 stands in stark contrast with conclusions often expressed in other IEA reports and could be the source of potential instability in oil markets if followed by some investors.”

To reporters, however, energy leaders didn’t mince words. Saudi energy minister Prince Abdulaziz bin Salman said to reporters, “It [the IEA report] is a sequel of [the] La La Land movie… Why should I take it seriously?… We [Saudi Arabia] are… producing oil and gas at low cost and producing renewables. I urge the world to accept this as a reality: that we’re going to be winners of all of these activities.”

Also adding to supply concerns, U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken said last week that sanctions on Iran would remain even if a nuclear deal was reached with Tehran. Blinken told reporters, “I would anticipate that even in the event of a return to compliance with the JCPOA (2015 Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action), hundreds of sanctions will remain in place, including sanctions imposed by the Trump administration.”

Further adding to domestic supply concerns is an expected decrease in U.S. crude oil production. According to the EIA, American oil production is expected to fall by 230,000 barrels per day in 2021 to 11.08 million bpd.

Consumers are already seeing the increase in crude prices reflected at the pump. According to AAA, the national average for gasoline prices is now sitting at $3.067 per gallon. That’s more than 3.5% higher than gas prices were a month ago and almost 50% higher than they were this time last year.

Will oil prices continue marching higher?

It’s hard to say.

Three weeks ago, Goldman Sachs said it expects crude prices to climb to $80 per barrel in the fourth quarter of this year, even with a resumption in Iranian supply.

A few days later, analysts at Bank of America said they believe oil could pop above $100 per barrel.

And now some are even calling for $200 oil.

Nevertheless (borrowing a phrase in a recent Forbes article by David Blackmon), the past 10 years are littered with the bodies of analysts who’ve tried to predict outrageous oil prices.

The truth of the matter is that OPEC and Big Oil control the price of oil through supply. If they want prices to go higher, they cut supply. And if they want oil prices to go lower, they ramp up production.

Of course, producers don’t want oil prices to be too low. If oil prices are too low, they won’t make a profit. But what most people don’t understand is that producers don’t want oil prices to be too high, either.

You see, they’ve learned their lesson. And that lesson was: The interest in fossil fuel alternatives is proportionate to fossil fuel prices.

In other words, when oil prices get too high, people will demand alternatives.

That’s bad for business.

And if oil prices get too high, those alternatives become economically viable.

That’s worse for business.

So OPEC and Big Oil do have significant interest in seeing tempered oil prices. They don’t want $200 oil. And they’ll do whatever they need to in order to lower prices, like increase supply. OPEC has done this a million times in the past.

Category: Oil Prices
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Samsung’s becoming a member of the MTA means one other method to share recordsdata between gadgets
Sun, 20 Jun 2021 05:39:05 GMT

Samsung has just joined the Mutual Transfer Alliance (MTA). It was set up by Xiaomi, Oppo and Vivo back in 2019 to standardize the transfer of files between devices, including smartphones and computers. This transfer would have worked locally and allows thin to be sent over a 20MB / s WiFi connection.

Samsung has joined the Mutual Transmission Alliance, which means Samsung can transfer data directly between Xiaomi, OPPO, vivo, OnePlus, Realme and other Chinese branded phones. This feature hasn’t opened yet, I’m looking forward to it. pic.twitter.com/QbMtDEbisH

– Ice Universe (@UniverseIce) June 17, 2021

Since the alliance was announced (via GSMArena), many other companies have teamed up to standardize wireless transmission technology and support each other’s devices. The list includes OnePlus, Meize, ZTE, Black Shark, HiSense, and Asus. Seeing another big name like Samsung could have a huge positive impact going forward.

Samsung is the largest and most popular smartphone brand in the world. This could have a huge impact on the future of how files are transferred between devices. As pointed out by GSMArena, the company already had its own wireless transmission function called Quick Share, which was launched back in 2020. At that time it replaced Android Beam.

Hopefully this doesn’t mean Quick Share will be replaced or shut down. We don’t have the exact details yet, but we expect the company to offer other alternatives to its current ones to make it easier for people to move content and files between their devices. We also don’t have a schedule of when we should expect MTA support on existing devices, nor do we know which devices it will be available first.

With Quick Share, MTA compatibility, and Google’s own Nearby Share, most users can certainly transfer all files between friends and a variety of different devices. Currently, Near Share is expected to arrive on ChromeOS and Windows 10 devices via the Chrome browser as well.

What do you think of Samsung joining the MTA? Do you think there are already too many file sharing standards out there? Let us know in the comments below!


Roland Udvarlaki

Roland is a technology enthusiast and software engineer based in the UK.

The post Samsung's becoming a member of the MTA means one other method to share recordsdata between gadgets first appeared on DAILY GADGET AND GIZMOS NEWS.

Category: Phones
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Crooked Creek Fire will only grow 200 acres in Red Flag conditions on Saturday
Sun, 20 Jun 2021 20:17:27 GMT
Crooked Creek Fire will only grow 200 acres in Red Flag conditions on Saturday

By Greg Hirst on June 20, 2021

Crooked Creek Fire June 19 (Dave LeFevre, BLM, Inciweb)

CASPER, Wyo – Despite hot, dry, and windy conditions and active fire behavior, the Crooked Creek Fire only grew 200 acres to the east on Saturday, according to an update from the Bureau of Land Management.

The fire, discovered on Tuesday, has now burned 5,400 acres in the Pryor Mountains near the Wyoming-Montana border. With 131 employees now working on the incident, the crews were able to double containment to 20% on Saturday. An outbuilding was lost.

An incoming cold front is expected to bring some rain over the fire from Sunday morning into the afternoon. Hot and dry conditions are expected to return by the middle of the week.

Article goes below …

“On Sunday the fire fighters plan to continue the point protection of the critical infrastructure, to build an additional fire line and to strengthen the already built fire line,” said BLM. 25 primary residences in the Sage Creek area are still subject to pre-evacuation by the Carbon County Sheriff’s Office.

Public areas in the fire area managed by the Custer Gallatin National Forest and the BLM are closed for security reasons.

Related stories from Oil City News:

Report a correction or typo.

The post Crooked Creek Fire will only grow 200 acres in Red Flag conditions on Saturday first appeared on Daily Wyoming Cowboy.

Category: Casper
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How Ontario’s canvassing rules will change the political landscape
Sun, 20 Jun 2021 01:14:24 GMT

Ontario Prime Minister Doug Ford sits in a back room of the Legislature of Queen’s Park in Toronto on June 14th as the MPPs vote for the government to pass laws that allow them to invoke the disregarded clause in order to to deal with a court ruling on an election financing law by a third party. The Ontario Supreme Court overturned the province’s electoral finance bill earlier that year, which would have capped third party spending outside of an election year.

Chris Young / The Canadian Press

Political ads have suddenly gotten out of hand in the days since Ontario Prime Minister Doug Ford invoked the disregarded clause of the constitution to introduce new restrictions on third party canvassing.

While the province won’t vote until next June, union ads targeting the progressive Conservative prime minister have surfaced online and in print, including one from the Ontario Federation of Labor with a grinning cartoon of Mr. Ford calling for it his government. a disaster. “Ontario Nurses Association newspaper advertisements called the new legislation” an intimidation tactic to protect the government from criticism and accountability. “

Ontario is suspending the charter to pass laws to restrict canvassing

These advertisements, and any other political messages produced by unions, interest groups or corporations, must comply with the restrictions in Ontario’s new, ongoing 12-month pre-campaign. It limits third-party political advertisers to the same $ 600,000 budget as the campaign’s six-month lead time under previous legislation. (A limit of $ 100,000 for third parties remains in effect during the 28-day campaign prior to the June 2nd vote.)

The story continues under the advertisement

It was Ontario’s first use of the clause that allows a government to override certain sections of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. A judge had classified the twelve-month embargo as an unconstitutional violation of freedom of expression.

While critics say Mr. Ford’s boundaries are designed to contain the unions that have dominated third party political advertising in Ontario, the new rules also appear to discourage potential allies of the government. Two of the biggest non-union editions of the 2018 campaign may be saying goodbye to the next.

Ontario Proud, the right-wing Facebook viral meme maker relentlessly targeting Liberal Prime Minister Kathleen Wynne, spent nearly $ 450,000 raised primarily by real estate developers, including $ 375,000 in what was then a six-month lock-up.

A source familiar with the group’s deliberations said it was undecided whether to register as a political advertiser this time and had no plans to do so at the moment. The Globe and Mail did not name the source as they were not allowed to speak publicly. Ontario Proud founder Jeff Ballingall declined to comment.

The Ontario Real Estate Association (OREA) – a leading funder in 2018 and led by former Ontario PC leader Tim Hudak – also remains on the sidelines, pointing out the crackdown on spending.

“The whole concept, the idea [of the new rules], made us think twice and decide not to enter the debate in the same way this year, “Hudak said in an interview, noting that the Ford government had also taken on board many of the guidelines advocated by OREA, such as speeding up permits to get more housing built. He said all parties were receptive to his group’s messages.

OREA spent just over $ 100,000 prior to the 2018 vote. The video ad showed a young couple seeing their dream of buying a house shattered with a short shot of a notepad that read “Real Estate Transfer Tax”. No candidate was selected in the ad or Mr. Ford specifically endorsed.

The story continues under the advertisement

LARGE DONORS

Top 10 Third Party Political Advertisers in the six months leading up to Ontario’s official 2018 election campaign by amounts spent, according to data from Elections Ontario.

(Service employee International Union Local 1

Canada, Healthcare Workers Union)

Better variety for Ontario

(United Steelworkers Canada)

The Ontario Medical Association

(Funded by major real estate developers and

Construction companies)

Ontario Association of Korean Entrepreneurs

(Funded by Imperial Tobacco Canada, Japan Tobacco

and Rothmans Benson & Hedges)

(More than 60 different unions or union halls)

Ontario Police Association

Ontario Real Estate Association

Association of Municipalities of Ontario

THE GLOBE AND THE MAIL, SOURCE:

CHOICES ONTARIO

LARGE DONORS

Top 10 Third Party Political Advertisers in the six months leading up to Ontario’s official 2018 election campaign by amounts spent, according to data from Elections Ontario.

(Service employee International Union Local 1 Canada,

Healthcare Workers Union)

Better variety for Ontario

(United Steelworkers Canada)

The Ontario Medical Association

(Funded by major real estate developers and construction companies)

Ontario Association of Korean Entrepreneurs

(Funded by Imperial Tobacco Canada, Japan Tobacco and

Rothmans Benson & Hedges)

(More than 60 different unions or union halls)

Ontario Police Association

Ontario Real Estate Association

Association of Municipalities of Ontario

GLOBE AND POST, SOURCE: ELECTIONS ONTARIO

LARGE DONORS

Top 10 Third Party Political Advertisers in the six months leading up to Ontario’s official 2018 election campaign by amounts spent, according to data from Elections Ontario.

(Service Employees International Union Local 1 Canada, Healthcare Workers Union)

Better variety for Ontario

(United Steelworkers Canada)

The Ontario Medical Association

(Funded by major real estate developers and construction companies)

Ontario Association of Korean Entrepreneurs

(Funded by Imperial Tobacco Canada, Japan Tobacco and Rothmans Benson & Hedges)

(More than 60 different unions or union halls)

Ontario Police Association

Ontario Real Estate Association

Association of Municipalities of Ontario

GLOBE AND POST, SOURCE: ELECTIONS ONTARIO

It’s a far cry from the advertisements Mr. Hudak faced as PC chief in 2014. He was targeted in a television campaign by the union-funded Working Families Ontario that highlighted his promise to lay off 100,000 civil servants and him as the bidding of cigar-smoking Bay Street suits.

“If you spend enough money and throw enough shit on every single person or political party, you can make Mother Teresa questionable,” said Hudak.

It was working families who challenged Mr. Ford’s new electoral law in court. Working families and unions say Mr Ford is trying to silence members as he doubles the province’s individual political donation limits to $ 3,300 a year and allows his PCs to raise more money from wealthy donors.

“Ford [is] only restrict opposition votes from people who don’t have the money to get their messages and votes out in other ways, ”said Sharleen Stewart, Canadian President of Service Employees International Union (SEIU) Healthcare, the largest third party donor in the 2018 campaign. Your union advocates for thousands of frontline nurses and personal assistants in Ontario’s long-term care homes, where 3,794 residents and employees have died from COVID-19.

The unions’ spending on slick ads in an unregulated landscape prompted the previous Liberal government to issue a six-month lock-up period that went into effect in 2018.

But Mr Ford and his MPPs seldom mention unions in defending the 12-month deadline – which is much longer than any comparable Canadian legislation – and instead cite the influence of the super-rich on the US election.

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“Nobody I’ve spoken to wants US-style politics, nobody wants billionaires to try to influence elections and buy out all of the ad space,” Ford said this week. “Nobody wants big corporations that make a lot of money to influence elections.”

Before the 2018 vote, 11 of the top 20 donors were unions or related groups. But the Ontario Medical Association, the Police Association of Ontario, and the Association of Municipalities of Ontario were also among the top donors. The Ontario Korean Businessmen’s Association, which represents shopkeepers on the corner, ranked fifth and spent nearly $ 365,000 – sponsored by tobacco companies – on a campaign that included ads for lower cigarette taxes.

The debate in the US and elsewhere has mostly centered on concerns that big corporations or the rich might buy elections. But the Ontario NDP calls Mr Ford’s new rules a violation of freedom of speech and crackdown on its union allies. (As a registered political party, the NDP is not subject to them.) It also ran campaign-style spots this week, including an attack report targeting Liberal leader Steven Del Duca rather than Mr Ford. NDP campaign director Michael Balagus said the party intends to spend $ 700,000 to $ 1 million on ads over the next month.

The idea behind the restrictions on third-party advertising is that parties and candidates are not drowned out. However, Robert MacDermid, an expert on election funding rules and professor emeritus of political science at York University, said that regulating third-party advertisements prior to a campaign was too much of an encroachment on freedom of expression.

The new rules, he said, place burdensome financial reporting requirements for a year on even small community groups wanting to discuss issues. He said that only the formal election period should have strict spending limits.

“It’s really difficult to do this in the prep phase of the campaign and we shouldn’t even try,” said Dr. MacDermid. “People should have their say. … Commercial speech is free, so political speech is free. It’s all a mess. I just don’t see any other way to deal with it in a democracy. “

The story continues under the advertisement

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The post How Ontario's canvassing rules will change the political landscape first appeared on LABOR NEWS WIRE.

Category: SEIU
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Attorneys’ union seeks rollback of IT Guidelines
Sun, 20 Jun 2021 20:20:54 GMT
Lawyers’ union seeks rollback of IT Rules

The All India Lawyers’ Union (AILU) called for the withdrawal of the rules for information technology (intermediary guidelines & code of ethics for digital media) in 2021, calling it undemocratic legislation that facilitates absolute surveillance, censorship and digital authoritarianism and violates privacy, personal freedom and liberty the expression of opinion and other fundamental rights of users and sinks the voices of dissenting opinions.

AILU National Vice President S. Rajendra Prasad and National Secretary N. Srinivasa Rao said in a press release that the central government had promulgated the rules despite objections from various civil society organizations, political parties and NGOs.

They claimed that an analysis of the rules reveals a hidden agenda, which is to suppress peaceful expression of democratic disagreement with the assistance of social media brokers.

The AILU officials said rule 4 (2) – traceability of users and information – empowers the government through enforcement agencies to tamper with social media intermediaries and break end-to-end encryption in order to track down the “first creators” . Indirectly, it allows the recording and storage of communication and data against the will of the user. Communications can be opened and exposed in total violation of the right to privacy, they claimed.

Rule 5 – Digital Media Regulation – allows law enforcement agencies to block news websites and portals that fail to comply with their orders. The government can use censorship to suppress and crush dissenting opinions and protests against its policies, they claimed.

The rule that provides for automated filtering becomes a tool for massive surveillance by the government in collaboration with the support of social media monopolies, and the user verification rule allows social media companies to run a user verification process with proof of identity like Aadhaar Numbers to be carried out. This leads to a commodification of user data and control.

The post Attorneys’ union seeks rollback of IT Guidelines first appeared on DAILY ZSOCIAL MEDIA NEWS.
Category: union
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The best things to do independently before a Royals or Chiefs game
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 03:42:59 GMT
The best things to do independently before a Royals or Chiefs game

No doubt about it: Kansas City has a passion for its professional sports teams! The NFL Chiefs and MLB Royals regularly draw crowds to their stadiums, both just 15 minutes from the historic city of Independence, Missouri.

If you’re attending an evening game at Arrowhead or Kaufman, a day trip to Independence is absolutely doable and great fun. There’s something for everyone! Here are some of our favorite ways to pass the day, all of which can be done with plenty of time for the big game.

VisitIndependence.com

Follow Truman’s trail

Independence is recognized nationally as the place where the 33rd President of the United States, Harry S. Truman, grew up and began his career in politics. And as you can imagine, there are plenty of places here to follow in his footsteps!

The first stop for many is the Harry S. Truman Presidential Library and Museum. The complex is in the final stages of a multi-million dollar renovation and is slated to open later in 2021, just in time for the 75th anniversary of Truman’s president. This large library houses Truman’s archives, artifacts, and experimental exhibits related to his life and presidency. Its courtyard is the final resting place of Truman, who preferred a private library service to an official funeral in Washington, DC. Family members also buried here include Truman’s wife Bess; her daughter Margaret; and Margaret’s husband.

If you’re also looking to get a better feel for Truman before he assumed the highest office in the country, a visit to Harry S Truman National Historic Site should be on your list. It actually includes a couple of buildings in Independence, like the Harry S. Truman Home, where Harry and Bess lived before and after their time in Washington. Across the street and also part of the historic site is Noland House, where Truman’s aunt and uncle lived. Entry to both is free, but you will need an entry ticket, which you can get at the visitor center.

The historic courthouse where Truman served as a judge is now the permanent seat of the Jackson County Historical Society; Tours of the office and courtroom where Truman once worked and presided are available.

Pro tip: Near downtown, look for large navy blue signs with the silhouette of former President Truman. These point out areas of interest for those who want to see additional places that are important to them. There’s also a self-guided walking tour that includes more stops along a 4.7 mile route – perfect if you want to take your steps before the game!

Covered wagon ride in Independence, MOVisitIndependence.com

In the pioneering days of the 19th century, independence was literally the crossroads with the west. The trails in Oregon, Santa Fe, and California all originate in the city, and thousands of people came on their way there for land, fortune, and sometimes shame. To learn more about these indomitable people and Independence’s role in expanding westward, head to the National Frontier Trails Museum a mile south of downtown.

The museum is a gem, filled with original journals, journals, and exhibits that will give you a firsthand sense of what the journey west really was like more than 150 years ago. It was tough, rough, and difficult, with a range of hardships endured along the way. You will leave with real appreciation for the pioneer efforts and perhaps a little gratitude for the way we live today.

Pro tip: Rail enthusiasts won’t want to miss the 1879 Chicago & Alton Depot. The train station, located on the museum grounds, was reconstructed and relocated from its original location by a group of volunteers who offer guided tours of the historical room.

Vaile Mansion in Independence, MOVisitIndependence.com

Take a self-guided architecture tour

The historic residential areas of Independence are real eye-catchers for architecture fans. Of course there are many wonderful historic buildings and houses in the city center, so the area around Truman’s house has been designated as a Historic District. Take time to stroll around the Bingham-Wagoner Estate. Laid out in 1827, the mural painter George Caleb Bingham once called it home.

The three-story Victorian Vaile Mansion north of downtown is also worth a visit, with its marble fireplaces, rich walnut woodwork, and onyx accents. Built in 1881 for a wealthy businessman and his wife, it is now open for tours and special events, including ghost hunting expeditions!

Independence has put together a comprehensive tour with many other architectural highlights. From log cabins to artisanal creations and everything in between, you’ll be amazed by the different historical styles you see around the city.

Women shopping in Independence, MO Historic SquareVisitIndependence.com

Stroll (and shop!) In historic Independence Square

You might want to do a retail purchase before heading to the stadium. No problem there! Historic Independence Square was the hub of action for pioneers heading west and is still the beating heart of the city. The Historic Truman Courthouse is in the center of the district, where you’ll find galleries, boutiques and shops, many of which are housed in multi-story buildings. Gourmets will delight in Gilbert Whitney & Co., located on the site of a trading house of the same name from 1833. Here you can find everything for your kitchen, from appliances and tools to bedding and dry goods, including coffee, tea and jam specialties. There is also a great selection of cheeses and wines!

Tivona Naturals, with its full line of natural body care products with essential oils, is the perfect place to stop and stock up when you want to treat yourself to something nice. We love their body butters and soaps.

Bottom line: The Square is the best stop to really get a feel for what Independence is all about before you dive into the ball game.

Visit the farmers market

If you’re attending an evening Royals game on Saturday, another great place to try out is the Independence Uptown Market. Here you can enjoy some farm-fresh snacks and browse handcrafted items like jewelry, textiles, and even natural pet treats. The market, which takes place on Saturdays from May to October, is right next to the square.

Women drink craft beer at 3 Trails Brewery in Independence, MOVisitIndependence.com

Grab a craft brew

If you’re a microbrewery fan, your ideal pregame routine might include some samples from a local brewery. If that’s the case, go to 3 Trails Brewing. This fun place has a variety of beers on tap, including IPAs, stouts, and even in season sours. Flatbreads are available for snacking, and there is an adjoining art gallery in the room next door. 3 Trails (named after the three pioneer trails that originated in Independence) also offers flights if you just can’t decide which beer you fancy – just take a sip!

Are you the designated driver? No problem. Instead of a beer, treat yourself to a Polly’s Pop! This locally made lemonade comes in a variety of flavors, from root beer to black cherry, grape, and even pineapple. Since Polly’s is done right in Independence, many places – including 3 trails – proudly serve it up as a tasty and nostalgic non-alcoholic alternative.

Steak and potatoes on plate in Independence, MOVisitIndependence.com

Eat a great meal before the game

Perhaps the idea of ​​making a “meal” out of loaded nachos, hot dogs, popcorn, and peanuts is not your idea of ​​acceptable food. We get it! So a trip to Independence before a Royals or Chiefs game is a good idea, especially for foodies. Vivilore, which is also home to an extensive antiques collection and homeware store, offers incredible steaks, seafood, and other classics with flair and finesse. The food is beautiful, as is the room, which is located in the historic Englewood Station Arts District – more on that below.

Ophelia’s Restaurant on the square serves modern American cuisine with a Cajun accent, with favorites like shrimp and grits, fried chicken, and gourmet mac ‘n’ cheese.

Pro tip: Ophelia’s also has a charming inn with spacious rooms, nice amenities and even a communal area for tea or coffee, which is located above the restaurant. If you’re looking for a place to spend the night after the game, the inn is a great option!

Admire the art

For some culture before a baseball or football game, head straight to the historic Englewood Station Arts District in Independence. This section of 1940s buildings anchored by the old Englewood cinema has a unique charm and funky feel all of its own. Galleries, studios, shops, and cafes line the district, giving you the perfect opportunity to browse and maybe buy the perfect new accent piece for your home! Englewood Station hosts special events year round, including art walks and open galleries.

To learn much more about all the amazing things to see, do and experience in Independence, Missouri – before the big game and beyond! – Check out the city’s online visitor guide, a first-person pregame experience or visit our Independence content here.

Visit Missouri Tourism

Missouri Tourism Department

The post The best things to do independently before a Royals or Chiefs game first appeared on Peach State Press.

Category: Macon
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Lina Khan, the brand new antitrust chief taking up Huge Tech
Sun, 20 Jun 2021 02:18:00 GMT
Lina Khan, the new antitrust chief taking on Big Tech

Just before Halloween in 2013, Lina Khan was strolling through the huge selection of candy at her local Safeway supermarket and got away with a disturbing revelation.

The around 40 brands of candy on the shelves only provided an illusion of consumer choice; they really only belonged to two or three pastry chefs. Khan, then a junior policy analyst, was so upset that she wrote about it in Time Magazine. “If we want a healthier, more diverse market – and more variety in our Halloween buckets – we could start reviving some of our antitrust laws.”

Khan’s criticism of corporate power goes far beyond Big Candy. She has examined concentration issues and monopoly behavior in sectors ranging from airlines to poultry and metals and reached similar conclusions. And she began to turn her attention to Big Tech’s undue market influence, eventually becoming one of its most vocal and prominent critics.

When Khan, only 32 years old, was appointed chairman of the Federal Trade Commission, the top competition regulator, this week by President Joe Biden, it sent shock waves across Washington, Wall Street and Silicon Valley. The prevailing expectation is that it will now attempt to usher in a new era of antitrust enforcement in America.

“Now she’s in charge, and she’s to be feared,” says Robert Kaminski, executive director of Capital Alpha Partners, a policy research group in Washington. “She has the hammer and only sees nails,” he adds.

Khan was born and raised in London to Pakistani parents; When she was 11, the family moved to the United States. The first indication of their interest in unfair corporate behavior came early.

A Starbucks cafe across from their high school in Mamaroneck, a northeastern suburb of New York City, prevented teenagers from sitting down because they were too noisy. An uproar ensued, which Khan recorded in her school newspaper and which was later picked up by the New York Times.

Khan attended Williams College, where she studied political theory. After graduation, she moved to Washington where she accepted a position with the New America Foundation, a center-left think tank that enabled her to research entrepreneurship and competition.

“Where we used to have a lot of independent companies, a lot of local companies, a lot of variety,” she said in 2012, “we now actually only see a handful of companies that control almost every industry.”

Khan eventually landed at Yale Law School and in January 2017 published the article in the Yale Law Journal that would catapult her to fame: “Amazon’s Antitrust Paradox”.

The piece went viral. “You can almost think of it as the first article in some kind of renaissance for antitrust revisionism,” says Robert Hockett, professor of corporate law at Cornell University.

At the heart of Khan’s philosophy is the idea that companies, including Amazon, have benefited from lax antitrust scrutiny for decades, a time when low consumer prices became the dominant factor in determining competition policy. She envisions a different antitrust regime, similar to that at the beginning of the 20th century when the US authorities did not hesitate to break up monopolies.

Amazon did not want to comment on their appointment.

“What it does is really just bring antitrust and market policy back to the status quo ante of the 20s to 60s, even the 70s,” says David Singh Grewal, law professor at the University of California at Berkeley.

People who know Khan – who is married to a cardiologist – describe her as humble and even a little reluctant.

“She really has a private life that is private,” says Grewal. “It’s easy to think of her as the face of the ‘millennial’, sometimes referred to as the ‘hipster’, but she’s so different from the personality-driven social media phenomenon that is growing around her.”

After graduating in law, Khan became a professor at Columbia and also worked with the Open Markets Institute, an anti-monopoly think tank in Washington. On Capitol Hill, she helped draft the House of Representatives Antitrust Subcommittee investigation into Big Tech. Many Republicans are still suspicious. “Your anti-trust enforcement views are also completely incompatible with prudent use of the law,” Utah senator Mike Lee said in March.

But Khan’s reputation soared in democratic circles, reaching beyond traditional big-tech critics like Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders to include more mainstream politicians like Biden. Although she was expected to get a spot on the FTC as a commissioner, few predicted that she would be selected to actually head the agency.

“She really managed to fly high that fast. And I would put it down to being just incredibly visionary, ”said Kate Judge, professor at Columbia University’s law school.

Sarah Miller, executive director of the American Economic Liberties Project, calls Khan the “Simone Biles” of antitrust law, referring to the record-breaking US Olympic gymnast. “Demonstrate that America is having this massive concentration crisis. . . helped make it clear to people in traditional democratic circles that a full page turning was necessary. . . And that she was the obvious one to lead it. “

james.politi@ft.com; lauren.fedor@ft.com

The post Lina Khan, the brand new antitrust chief taking up Huge Tech first appeared on DAILY ZSOCIAL MEDIA NEWS.
Category: Tech
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New York Knicks Bet $1 Win $100 Playoff chances
Fri, 07 May 2021 14:15:29 GMT

New York has +4,000 odds — meaning a $100 bet would win $4,000 — to get to the NBA Finals, according to sportsbetting.com. The Knicks have the tenth-best odds to win the title, behind the Nets (+225), Lakers (+325), Clippers (+550), Jazz (+750), Bucks (+900) and 76ers (+1,200).

Bet $1 Win $100

Don’t miss your chance to pocket an easy $100!

The Knicks are showcasing their potential on both sides of the court and are one of the hottest teams in the league, at least until the Nuggets slowed them down on their trip out west.

The Knicks are the toast of the league right now and Tom Thibodeau (+600) is in the mix for Coach of the Year in his first season with the orange and blue. They have the best scoring defense in the league, a matchup nightmare in Julius Randle, and a top-notch closer in Derrick Rose, so there are myriad reasons New York can upset a higher seed this bizarre playoff year.

The New York Knicks have a 96% chance of making the playoffs and a <1% chance of winning the NBA Finals.

Team Roster
 
  NAMEPOSAGEHTWTCOLLEGESALARY
 
https://a.espncdn.com/i/headshots/nba/players/full/4395625.png
SG
20
6′ 6″
214 lbs
Duke
$8,231,760
 
https://a.espncdn.com/i/headshots/nba/players/full/2528779.png
SF
30
6′ 6″
205 lbs
North Carolina
$4,200,000
 
https://a.espncdn.com/i/headshots/nba/players/full/6429.png
SG
29
6′ 6″
214 lbs
Colorado
$6,000,000
 
https://a.espncdn.com/i/headshots/nba/players/full/3986.png
C
35
6′ 9″
232 lbs
USC
$1,442,968
 
https://a.espncdn.com/i/headshots/nba/players/full/4066248.png
PG
23
5′ 10″
175 lbs
Auburn
 
https://a.espncdn.com/i/headshots/nba/players/full/4278075.png
SF
21
6′ 7″
215 lbs
Kentucky
$4,588,680
 
https://a.espncdn.com/i/headshots/nba/players/full/2991280.png
C
27
6′ 11″
220 lbs
Kentucky
$5,000,000
 
https://a.espncdn.com/i/headshots/nba/players/full/4230547.png
PG
22
6′ 4″
200 lbs
$6,176,578
 
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27
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28
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25
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21
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26
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Homeless in Denver
Tue, 23 Mar 2021 12:06:15 GMT

Leslie's Illustrated 1879

As the Colorado economy has grown and housing prices have skyrocketed, we have been witness to a highly visible rise in homelessness. It would be a mistake, however, to think this is a new problem. In fact, Denver’s lack of housing and substandard housing goes back to the time of Westward Expansion. As soon as the Gold Rush hit, land speculators arrived, and those without means would often continue on in their meager subsistence. According to local historian Phil Goodstein, the 1870s saw a boom in poverty and insufficient housing to match the boom in industrialization.

“Shortly after the railroad arrived in Denver in 1870, tracks started to cut through the area close to the Platte River…The area between the depot and the river increasingly filled with warehouses and factories. Simple residences were scattered among them…Shanties popped up leading city hall to dismiss the section as a slum. Floods sporadically washed away homes and businesses.”

This area, long referred to as “the Bottoms” became a haven for newly arrived immigrants, particularly from the early Italian community, who would set up small farms and even cultivate water chestnuts. It would be an understatement to refer to many of these communities as hard-scrabble. Often, whole families suffered brutal winters in poorly-constructed, unheated shacks, as they had little to no money for coal or other fuels. In 1874, the city physician, Dr. Bancroft, and a group of local women began work on a city hospital for those simultaneously experiencing homelessness and illness. This would augment the county hospital that already provided for those who were indigent. Such places were often referred to as “poor houses,” not to be confused with the poor farm, which is a story for another time.

Women, children and a dog at entrance to tent home

Throughout the 1880s and 1890s (though certainly not exclusive to that period), Denver’s  priorities had more to do with the removal of squatters from land the city wished to utilize than the endemic issue of poverty and housing stock. During the coldest part of 1897, the city was ready to construct the 14th Street viaduct, and so they ordered the destruction of numerous shanty towns with names like “Paradise Alley,” Edgewater,” and “Riverside Park.” One intrepid reporter from the Rocky Mountain News decided to highlight the living conditions of the residents, focusing on a family of five named Brittenheimer. What follows is the newspaper’s description of the Brittenheimer home from January 3, 1897: 

“The building of this abode certainly did not consume over a day or two. A vigorous wielding of a pair of shovels soon gouged into the embankment a crevice about two feet in breadth at the opening and about ten feet in diameter inside. The roof is old mother earth, strengthened by a few rotten boards. The house comprises one room, which is intended to be circular in shape and is about ten feet across. Several thicknesses of gunny sacks do for a doorway and a hole, through which is thrust a rusty piece of stovepipe, stolen from some dump pile, carries the smoke out of the cave.”

The reporter went on to describe in vivid detail makeshift furniture, the struggle to scavenge bits of coal from the railroads, and the common occurrence of exposure-induced death in such communities. Some of these communities, such as Petertown, would endure for decades, but often residents experienced an endless cycle of displacement.

Sunshine Rescue Mission

By the early 1910s, facilities such as the poor farm and county hospital were expanded. Civic and religious organizations worked to fund group homes for orphans and children who were homeless. The Colored Orphanage and Old Folks’ Home at 873 Zuni Street even offered to take in children from poor families in exchange for “a very small pittance.” One crusading Denverite, Edwin A. Brown, toured the country dressed as a homeless man and wrote a book documenting the mistreatment he received in cities across the country. He advocated for municipal emergency homes to house the unhoused and won the backing of trade associations in cities like Denver, but no radical reforms ever came. 

Even before the Depression hit Denver, the city continued to be plagued by the many hardships brought by unchecked poverty. Once the Depression set in, things only continued to intensify, in part due to municipal policies. Some people took to living in holes in the ground in shantytowns like Gopher City. While some of those most in need began to see income from federal programs like the Works Progress Administration, in 1938 the city embarked on a project of tearing down family shanties deemed unsafe, with no real plan for replacement housing. In the words of Mrs. E. B. Stallsworth whose family lived in a five-room shack at 13 Sand Street, 

“If they tear our house down, we’ll have to pay rent. I don’t see how we can pay rent and buy food for a family of seven on what my husband makes on the WPA.” Rocky Mountain News March 24, 1938.

Denver shanty town

This shanty razing program was spearheaded by chief building inspector, Wendell T. Hedgecock. His comments in the March 22, 1938, Rocky Mountain News suggest there was also a racial component to his policies. He claimed the program would “prevent their again swarming into Denver next fall after the sugar beet harvest.” Even in the 19th century, it was common for seasonal farm workers to spend winters along the Bottoms in Denver and, particularly, in immigrant communities like Globeville.

While these migrant workers were primarily German and Russian at the beginning of the 20th century, by the time the Depression came, Latinos had become the most prevalent demographic in the beet fields. The local welfare bureau went so far as to claim that these seasonal workers were not true city residents; thus, by destroying their winter quarters, local charity funds wouldn’t be wasted on the undeserving. From the same article:

“Social service workers are generally of the opinion that the destruction of these shelters will drive out hundreds of families from Denver. It will mean a more equitable distribution of relief money to those remaining on the rolls.”

It wasn’t all bad news, however. In October 1938, the Denver Housing Authority under the leadership of James Q. Newton, father of the future mayor of the same name, announced plans to use some of the slum clearance money to construct affordable housing. Rents would be reduced or fully subsidized and playgrounds would accompany developments. While well-meaning, it was not enough to alleviate the city’s problem. A 1941 survey showed that infant mortality in the poorest parts of the city were more than double the city’s average. Most of these deaths were attributed to respiratory disease, diarrhea, and enteritis. 

By the close of the 1940s, the city was temporarily shocked by the death of 18-month-old Roberta Van Meter, who died when her family’s shack went up in flames. Longtime Denver Post columnist, Lee Casey (Denver Post November 4, 1949) denounced how the war had been used as an excuse to delay construction of new homes for the poor while, after the war, again nothing was done because people claimed material and labor costs were too high.

Denver Post Building 1940s-1950s?

While the 1950s are often considered a high point of American prosperity, the rising tide did not lift all boats. Blighted communities were such an issue in 1950 that the Denver Post published a long series of articles on the subject. The areas considered blighted continued to be clustered along the Platte River and two-thirds of the homes were considered unfit to live in. Because of redlining and other discriminatory loan practices, 81% of the homes were owned by landlords. This only contributed to further neglect and lack of reinvestment in the properties and communities. Landlords were making millions on substandard properties that had already outlived their life expectancies.

Progressive Denver Mayor Quigg Newton attempted to focus on the problem by coordinating aid from the public housing authority, the urban redevelopment program, and the city building department. The city had also set up its own housing agency that was working to find affordable housing for the poor as well as the many people displaced by the Valley Highway Program, which built Interstate 25 through Denver. The agency worked to keep track of housing vacancies to place those who could afford rent and to help those who couldn’t access public housing. At the time, 300 city blocks along the east bank of the Platte were considered blighted and at least 5,000 homes did not meet basic building codes.

By 1954, the mayor’s office announced an extensive plan based on a 3-year study of the issue. It included better building codes, better maintenance of existing structures, and more extensive coordination between city departments. In 1955, however, the city council passed a new, tough housing code meant to eliminate slums with little regard for housing needs. As the 1950s came to a close, the city claimed that over 11,000 dwellings had been brought into compliance and approximately 1,300 had simply been demolished.

Citizen's Mission

In part two, we will continue to explore the cycle of poverty and lack of adequate housing through the end of the 20th century. In the meantime, if you want to learn more about how these issues impact people today and/or want to get involved, see the following links:

Colorado Coalition for the Homeless has an educational series.

Interfaith Alliance offers the opportunity for people to sign up for information on legislative action.

Denver’s Office of Housing Stability serves as advocates.

Metro Denver Homeless Initiative offers the opportunity to join councils and committees to work on the issue.

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DEADLINE TOMORROW: The Schall Law Firm Reminds Investors of a Class Action Lawsuit Against Emergent BioSolutions Inc. and Encourages Investors with Losses in Excess of $100,000 to Contact the Firm
Sun, 20 Jun 2021 15:50:38 GMT

Schall Law Firm, a national shareholder rights law firm, is reminding investors of a class action lawsuit against Emergent BioSolutions Inc. (“Emergent BioSolutions” or “the Company”) (NYSE: EBS) for violating Sections 10 (b) and 20 (a ) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and Rule 10b-5, which were published by the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Investors who acquired the Company’s securities between April 24, 2020 and April 16, 2021 inclusive (the “Class Period”) are advised to contact the Company before June 21, 2021.

If you suffered a loss as a shareholder, click here to participate.

We also encourage you to contact Brian Schall of the Schall law firm, 2049 Century Park East, Suite 2460, Los Angeles, CA 90067, at 310-301-3335 to discuss your rights free of charge. You can also contact us on the firm’s website at www.schallfirm.com or by email at brian@schallfirm.com.

In this case, the class has not yet been certified and you will not be represented by a lawyer until certified. If you do nothing, you can remain an absent class member.

According to the lawsuit, the company provided false and misleading information to the market. Emergent BioSolution’s Baltimore facility had a number of manufacturing issues that increased the likelihood of product contamination. The company suffered a number of FDA citations due to the poor quality of its Baltimore operations. The company was forced to discard the equivalent of millions of COVID-19 vaccine doses after the facility deviated from standard procedures. Because of these facts, the company’s public statements were false and materially misleading throughout the class period. When the market learned the truth about Emergent BioSolutions, investors suffered damage.

Join the case to make up for your losses.

The law firm Schall represents investors worldwide and specializes in securities class actions and shareholder disputes.

This news release may be viewed as a solicitation in some jurisdictions under applicable law and ethical rules.

The post DEADLINE TOMORROW: The Schall Law Firm Reminds Investors of a Class Action Lawsuit Against Emergent BioSolutions Inc. and Encourages Investors with Losses in Excess of 0,000 to Contact the Firm first appeared on DAILY LEGAL PRESS.

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5:10 am until Yuma is Saturday – Yuma Pioneer
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 00:19:26 GMT
Moisture just keeps moving - Yuma Pioneer

The 5:10 to Yuma 5k / 10k Walk / Run begins Saturday morning on Main Street.
The organizers expect around 200 plus participants between the 5k and the 10k. Here is the schedule and some important things to keep in mind:
Friday June 18th
• Package pickup and registration at the Bank of Colorado from 10:00 am to 1:00 pm

Saturday, June 19 (race day)
• 5:00 AM – Main Street is closed from First Avenue and Main to Highway 34. All of Main Street will reopen after 7:30 am, with the exception of the 100 block of Main. The 100 block of the Main opens for vehicles at 12 noon.
• 6 am – package pick-up and registration available on race day on Second and Main.
• 7:10 am – start of the race (10 km will start at 7:10 am and 5 km will be a few minutes later)
Please watch out for runners on all roads during 7:10 a.m. and 10 a.m. The roads will not be closed so please be careful and stick to the volunteers who can direct the traffic.
• 8 am – A pancake breakfast will be served to participants in the race. (Breakfast can be purchased for $ 6.)
Entertainment starts on First and Main.
Beer garden open to race participants (with red armband).
• 11 am – Awards to the age group winners and the fastest 10 km and 5 km male / female overall.
• 11:30 am – collapse and celebrations end.

Courses
The courses are well marked and there are lots of great volunteers! Aid stations at the airport, 37 County Road, 10th and Elm and 3rd and Ivy.

Route for 5K
Second Ave. and Main St. to 10th Ave. / right on 10th to Ash / left on Ash to 13th / right on 13th to Birch Circle / left on Birch Circle to 10th / left on 10th to Elm / right on Elm to Sixth Ave. / Left on Sixth to Ivy / right on Ivy to Third Ave / right on Third to Elm / left on Elm to Park / right on Park to Second / left on Second to Main and Finish.

Course route for 10k
Second Ave. and Main to 10th / left on 10th to Buffalo / right on Buffalo to 11th / right on 11th to Albany / left on Albany to the gravel road and end of the road / left on gravel road / Highway 59 to the airport / cross the airport runway to End of old runway / turn right / follow path to cross Highway 59 to County Road 37 / County Road 37 to County Road E / right on County Road E to 10th / right on 10th Elm / left on Elm to Sixth Ave. / left on Sixth to Ivy / right on Ivy to Third Ave. / right on Third to Elm / left on Elm to Park / right on Park to Second / left on Second to Main and Finish .

The post 5:10 am until Yuma is Saturday - Yuma Pioneer first appeared on Arizona Daily Press.

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Kenya reports 283 new COVID-19 infections, the total number of cases reaches 179,075
Sun, 20 Jun 2021 15:06:51 GMT
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FILE PHOTO: A local isolation ward for patients with COVID-19 in Machakos, Kenya. / VCG
FILE PHOTO: A local isolation ward for patients with COVID-19 in Machakos, Kenya. / VCG

The number of COVID-19 infections in Kenya rose to 179,075 on Sunday after the Ministry of Health recorded 283 new cases out of 3,452 tests performed in the last 24 hours.

Nine new deaths were recorded over the same period, bringing the total number of virus-related deaths in the country to 3,456.

The country is experiencing a third wave of the pandemic, with the western region in particular seeing a steady increase in new cases every day.

The government responded with stricter measures in the region, including a longer night curfew. While the rest of the country begins curfew at 10 p.m. and ends at 4 a.m., 13 counties in the western region, including the third largest city, Kisumu, have their curfew from 7 p.m.

Other government-imposed measures include a ban on large public gatherings and the wearing of face masks.

Kenya has also carried out a mass vaccination program with 1,183,376 vaccines so far.

The post Kenya reports 283 new COVID-19 infections, the total number of cases reaches 179,075 first appeared on Africa Chamber News.

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97% of PCR positives aren’t false
Sat, 19 Jun 2021 05:04:36 GMT

A clip of a woman calling Bristol and Weston NHS Foundation Trust about coronavirus tests has been shared widely on social media.

In the clip, the caller claims that she has submitted a Freedom of Information request to the trust and found out that it runs its PCR tests with up to 45 cycles.

She says running PCR tests with more than 25 cycles means that most of the “positive” cases are false positives and the trust is “committing medical fraud and crimes against humanity.” 

This is not true. 

It is implausible that 97% of positives identified by PCR tests run at more than 25 cycles are false, as the caller claims. At higher cycles, PCR tests are more likely to detect people who have low levels of virus, which could indicate they are early or late in their infection. 

It doesn’t mean they are “false positives”. We’ve written more about cycle thresholds and the controversy surrounding them before.

What are PCR test cycles?

A PCR test works by first isolating and purifying any genetic material that you want to identify, and then repeatedly cooling and heating it in the presence of various substances to replicate it.

PCR tests are specific to the genetic material of interest—they don’t just replicate all the genetic material present. 

Some of the substances mixed with the sample produce fluorescence when they come into contact with the genetic material.

If the genetic material is present, more and more of it is replicated with each cycle, gradually increasing the fluorescence until it is detectable. 

The number of times the sample is heated and cooled before the fluorescence becomes detectable is called the cycle threshold. 

The fewer cycles required before fluorescence is observed, the greater the concentration of viral genetic material in the original sample, roughly speaking. 

Conversely, the more cycles that are required, the smaller the concentration of material in the original sample. 

Public Health England says that, typically, a maximum of 40 cycles are conducted when testing for SARS-CoV-2. Bristol and Weston Foundation Trust has said it runs 45 cycles on its PCR tests.

After all the cycles are done, if no fluorescence is detected, the sample is deemed to be negative. However, a positive PCR result after any number of cycles does indicate that the material of interest was present, if only in very small quantities.  

The caller’s claims

“I don’t know if you’re aware that Kary Mullis, the man who invented the PCR test said anything over 24 or 25 [cycles], you will find anything that you’re looking for”

Kary Mullis, the inventor of the PCR method, did say “with PCR, if you do it well, you can find almost anything in anybody,” though we can’t find an instance of him referring to a specific cycle number. 

But, regardless of what Kary Mullis did or didn’t say, it doesn’t mean that coronavirus PCR tests are frequently “detecting” false positives, in Bristol or anywhere else.

As mentioned, PCR tests are typically run with up to 40 cycles. During periods of low coronavirus prevalence, such as in summer 2020 or spring 2021, the PCR positivity rate in England has fallen below 1%. 

At those times, even if every single positive case was false, more than 99% of PCR tests were still returning negative results so it’s just not true that if you run PCR tests using more than 25 cycles “you will find anything that you’re looking for”. 

Nor are most Covid-19 cases found with an extremely high number of cycles. An academic study of the PCR tests conducted by the Office for National Statistics last year found that positive cases were detected after a median of 26.2 cycles. (So half were below this number and half were above.) 

“The PCR test, if you run it over a certain amount, if you run it over 25, you get a 97%, positive, false positive, which means you’re running yours on 45, which means 97% of your positives are false.”

It’s unclear whether the caller meant that:

97% of all positives detected by PCR tests which are run with a maximum of 25 cycles or more (i.e. all PCR tests) are false (regardless of whichever cycle number the positive was detected), or  97% of positives detected after at least 25 cycles are false.

If she means that 97% of all PCR positives are false, this is demonstrably untrue. 

If 97% of all positives are false, then of the 3,834,387 positive cases so far detected in England by PCR, only 115,032 would have been “true” positives. Yet in England, more people have already died with Covid as a cause, in the opinion of their doctor.  

If she means that 97% of positives detected after at least 25 cycles are false, then there is no evidence to support that either. 

This claim may have originated from claims from an Irish GP called Dr Vincent Carroll who used similar figures when incorrectly describing the “false positive rate” (which is a different measure). When asked about the claim fact checker  thejournal.ie, Dr Carroll cited as evidence two scientific papers. But the authors of these papers say their research says no such thing. 

Both scientists contacted essentially said their papers showed that positives which were detectable only above 25 or 35 cycles indicated people who were not infectious.

But that doesn’t mean they are “false positives”. PCR tests do not diagnose illness or infection. They just detect whether the virus is in the sample or not. 

In theory, it is plausible that, at times of very low prevalence, the proportion of all positive results which are false positives could be very high. 

For example, if no-one at all had SARS-CoV-2, and one person tested positive, then the proportion of positives which were false would be 100%.

But that doesn’t mean the test is inaccurate, given it would have detected everyone else, correctly, as being negative. 

Besides, this clearly is not what happened during the pandemic, when many thousands of people in the UK have become ill and died. 

Also, it should be said that false negatives, where someone who genuinely has the virus tests negative, are also a concern when it comes to PCR tests.

This can be caused by, for example, people doing home tests not swabbing themselves correctly.

The ONS says: “Studies suggest that sensitivity may be somewhere between 85% and 98%,” meaning that the false negativity rate could be up to 15%.

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District 49’s proposal would prohibit the teaching of Critical Racial Theory | Colorado Springs News
Sun, 20 Jun 2021 16:32:02 GMT
District 49's proposal would prohibit the teaching of Critical Racial Theory |  Colorado Springs News

A battle over Critical Race Theory is raging in school boards across the country and in Colorado Springs, where a board member asked many minds this month: What is it?

The District 49 Education Committee recently voted in favor of a resolution that would prohibit teaching the theory in its classrooms.

The June 10 board meeting dealt with topics ranging from improving teachers’ salaries to making a district charter school safer. But the liveliest conversation streamed live on YouTube was about Critical Race Theory and its role in public schools.

The subject has become the subject of heated public debate, debate, and several recent state laws. Legislators in Idaho, Iowa, Oklahoma, Tennessee, and Texas passed bills banning Critical Theory of Race in public schools, with similar proposals on the table in several other states.

D-49 board chairman John Graham proposed that a committee be formed to develop a resolution on the board’s intention to prohibit the teaching of the theory and submit it to a later vote.

“Everyone on this team is concerned about the split,” said Graham, adding that Critical Race Theory “runs counter to our district cultural compass.”

Robert Loevy, a professor emeritus of political science at Colorado College, said that Critical Race Theory has been around for decades and that it has only recently turned from an academic movement to a political wedge.

“What began as an idea on college campuses has spilled over into the national media and political arena,” said Loevy, who taught political science for more than half a century. “It was only a matter of time before the topic – which was born in higher education – found its way into the circles.”

Dave Cruson, the sole dissident of the four board members present (Vice President Kevin Butcher was absent from the meeting) said that a more thorough understanding of what Critical Race Theory is and how it is taught is necessary before moving forward with a resolution .

“I understand this is a hot topic, but what does (Critical Racial Theory) mean?” Asked Cruson. “I need more understanding. I think we all do. “

Manya Whitaker, associate professor of education at Colorado College, said critical race theory is not an academic subject like history or math that can be taught in K-12 classrooms.

“Critical Race Theory is just that – it’s a theory,” says Whitaker, who specializes in political and social issues in education. “It’s not self-satisfied.”

Whitaker acknowledged that institutional racism can be a difficult topic to introduce to younger students, but said that some of the principles of Critical Race Theory are critical to understanding how America’s past relates to its present.

“For example, I have a student who is a high school economics and social studies teacher,” said Whitaker. “She cannot teach about the right to vote without also explaining to her children the history of who has been denied the right to vote and how this affects current voting patterns and practices.”

“It’s about power: who has the power, how did they get it, how do they use it, and who is affected,” added Whitaker. “That’s part of what (Critical Race Theory) is asking us to investigate.”

Opponents of the theory say that it teaches that all whites are oppressors and that America is a racist country. That’s just not true, claims Whitaker. Rather, it encourages a thorough, unvarnished approach to teaching and learning American history, including its less flattering chapters.

“The term ‘critical race theory’ evokes emotions that make people defensive,” she explained. “Nobody highlights any particular white person or even talks about white people. We are talking about the structures of this country that create a racial hierarchy. “

Whitaker said that while a resolution banning Critical Race Theory might be satisfactory for the more conservative members of the District 49 board of directors, it would be virtually impossible to enforce.

“No matter what laws you pass, if a teacher is actually trained in (Critical Race Theory), he can teach through a lens of (theory) all the time and you would never know,” she said.

The District 49 Board decided to work with the Equity Leadership Advisory Council, administrators, and district legal staff to finalize the proposed resolution by August 31st.

District Chief Education Officer Peter Hilts warned against drafting a resolution without the involvement of the district’s Equity Leadership Advisory Council, which is expected to meet by August.

Board member Rick Van Wieren said the proposal was in part a response to growing concern among District 49 parents and other voters, and that a resolution would serve as the district’s final word on an issue that comes up at almost every board meeting.

“We have to do something very specific to keep Critical Racial Theory out of our schools,” said Van Wieren. “A simple resolution that says we won’t do it makes it clear and concise for everyone in my opinion and avoids confusion in the future.”

Board member Ivy Liu reiterated Van Wieren’s claim that Critical Racial Theory has no place in public schools.

“We have to deal with what (the theory) stands for, how it affects our district, and what it says to our people and our students,” she said, adding that she thought the theory made students aware of personal responsibility give birth, foster division, and teach that America offers opportunities only to a select few.

“I am an immigrant,” said Liu. “We have come to this land of opportunity. Don’t tell me this country is terrible for people looking for opportunities. “

Teachers are suspicious of new laws restricting racial education

The post District 49's proposal would prohibit the teaching of Critical Racial Theory | Colorado Springs News first appeared on GLENDALE CHERRY CREEK CHRONICLE.

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An American dream of family, future and good food | Colorado Springs News
Sun, 20 Jun 2021 03:30:31 GMT
An American dream of family, future and good food |  Colorado Springs News

Meet Robert Felipe Velasquez, the owner of Filipes 109 and a versatile family man.

It was the place you passed, perhaps paused, on your way to another location as you marked the time at the traffic lights at S. Academy and Hancock in Colorado Springs.

A squat place with fast food bones from the 80s, on a sandwich toss from two main roads (“excellent signage and traffic!”), But only accessible by car via a winding path behind a church parking lot in a street that doesn’t have a name because technically it’s not a street.

Wasn’t it a gyro joint before?

I remember tacos. And chinese food. And burgers. (All true).

The story of 3008 S. Academy Blvd. is a global culinary crawl of startup hopes, good food and job vacancies. Then one day in early 2021 you see the building freshly painted and given a new sign and ask yourself: Who would open a restaurant there, especially at a time like this?

29-year-old former firefighter Robert Felipe Velasquez is that guy. He knows he’s facing an uphill battle, but he also knows what he’s fighting for: family and future.

“Yeah, it’s a bit of a hassle to get in here … but God was good to us. We keep getting loyal people who were with us when we were in the truck and still come to support us, ”he said in early March, a month after the Felipes 109 moved from a food truck to his own new brick-and-mortar base.

Failure is certainly a concern, but it’s not an option.

“When all the other doors are closed and you only have one way to go, just walk through the door and believe you will make it,” he said. “You have to believe that somehow, or somehow, the American dream will come true, and we just have to find out.”

Knowing where you are going is important even if you’re not sure how to get there – or what it will be like when you get there. For Robert Velasquez, the goal has always been “something entrepreneurial, something successful,” said his wife Jenna.

“He’s always been very generous, kind, really funny – and really upbeat too,” said Jenna. It was these traits that first attracted her to her future husband when the two met and became friends in church as teenagers. However, after eight years of marriage and three children, Robert’s world-class optimism has led to some tough and emotional conversations.

“He really is a dreamer. Every day he says, ‘Oh, we could do that’ or ‘That would be such a great invention or this is such a great business idea …’ He doesn’t like being told ‘No’, ”Jenna said, in contrast tended to live in the moment and get overwhelmed thinking about what’s to come. “I think we complement each other well. My job is to support him, but to say, ‘These are great ideas, but maybe you shouldn’t be doing all of them.

Growing up in the Springs, Robert and his sister Shanity had discussed opening a restaurant with their grandmother Evelyn Tilden, a natural cook who had attended cooking school but had to give up her calling. When he was 18, Robert and Evelyn even started a grassroots burrito business, making the wraps, and selling them to office workers at companies around the Springs.

The experience got his entrepreneurial juices flowing, but after graduating from high school in 2010, another burning passion topped his list.

“One of the things I heard as a kid was, ‘I let go of my dreams to raise you,'” he said. “I always knew I wanted to be a firefighter … and if I didn’t follow my dreams, what should I say to my own children?”

Meet Robert Felipe Velasquez, the owner of Filipes 109 and a versatile family man.

Robert and Jenna married in 2013 and Charlotte was born in late December. Robert had worked in construction and they had saved their money to buy a house. The following year he applied and was inducted into the City of Fountain’s eight-month Fire Academy. In October 2016, he completed his studies and went straight to EMT training. He finished this program in May 2017 when Baby Leo arrived.

All of these plans – and the world as he knew it – changed forever.

“Leo had all of these complications and was in and out of the hospital for about eight months and three months in the summer,” said Robert, whose young son did not gain weight and had difficulty breathing. “He choked and turned blue. And we didn’t know what was going on. Nobody did. “

It would be almost two years before Leo received an official diagnosis: a rare syndrome caused by a genetic mutation that causes microcephaly and severe developmental and neurological delays. Leo also suffered a brain injury at birth that left him with cerebral palsy and visual impairment.

His and Jenna’s life now revolved around caring for a critically ill child with special needs. Dream jobs had to wait for now.

“The fire department has been great for us as (colleagues) donated sick hours to us while he was in hospital so we could keep getting paid,” said Robert. “The fire department was a dream for me, and it is a dream that has come true.”

It was a dream that didn’t last. Dealing with medical trauma at home and back at work would soon prove to be too much.

“He was having a really hard time getting back into the groove after our son,” Jenna said. “He’s always had such a big heart and he’s nice to everyone. He just wants to take care of everyone … “

Suddenly he couldn’t. The universe had said, “No.” Or at least “not like that”.

“How can I help someone else if I can’t even help my own child at home? That’s how I felt then. I loved firefighters, but I just couldn’t juggle both of them, ”said Robert, who was working on the 26th gap he did after high school.

That’s what he did when planning his next move and spending as much time as possible with Jenna, Charlotte and Leo when the pandemic broke out.

“People are on leave, every week there is a conversation, ‘Are we going to close?’ Or, ‘This guy has COVID and he’s in the hospital,’ “said Robert, whose son is immunocompromised and particularly susceptible to the virus.” There were so many variables. I thought either I might be out of work next week or I have to do something else. “

By then, however, he had already figured out what the next step would be. He and Shanity’s old plans to start a restaurant business were back on the table, and the wheels were turning.

Robert applied for a loan in February 2020 but couldn’t get enough money to fund a start-up restaurant. He had “never run a food truck, had no food truck friends,” and had no idea how to promote a business on social media. They would work these details out later.

“We thought we could afford a food truck … so we went looking for a used food truck,” says Robert.

At first Jenna said she was pushing back.

“I understand why he left the fire department but then jumped straight into a food truck … I thought, ‘Oh my god, this is crazy. This guy is so optimistic that I can’t even handle it, ‘”she said.

As long as there was room for hope, she knew her husband would find him. She also knew he wasn’t going to give up.

“I finally realized that this was the beginning of his dream and probably a step in the right direction,” she said. “People said he was crazy to open a food truck during a pandemic, but he said, ‘It’s the perfect timing.’ We learned a lot in less than a year. “

Among these lessons: Don’t make a hard turn in a food truck if your cabinets are unlocked.

Also, if you’re looking to buy a stick-shift food truck, make sure that if you ever want to take a day off, you’re not the only one who can drive it.

“Let’s just say the food truck business was a little more overwhelming than we thought,” Shanity said.

With a willingness to work more than 17 hours a day, perform last-minute appearances, and adhere to flexible hours, Felipe’s 109 “New Mex” offerings gained a following and a growing presence within the first few months of operation in Springs. Things were “insanely busy” but Robert looked up, said Robert.

Then came another fulcrum that had nothing to do with pandemics.

Jenna gave birth to the couple’s third child, Georgiana, on October 9, 2020. As a newborn, she showed many of the same symptoms as Leo, albeit less severe. She still has trouble swallowing and needs to be fed through a catering tube.

Robert’s search for a stationary location was a top priority.

“At this point I call Shanity and say we have to let the food truck go. I can’t drive around everywhere, find a place to go next, be up day and night, ”said Robert. “We need a place that we can call home, where at the end of the day when everything is crazy, my family knows where to find dad. We do not give up our dream and we do not give up our family. “

After a number of potential locations and businesses failed, Robert asked someone at his Victory World Outreach church if they knew anything about the empty restaurant on the stamp corner of the huge parking lot.

Sure, other stores there hadn’t made it. But they weren’t him.

He got the number of the owner, called and explained his “situation”. The man asked about a relapse plan.

“‘There is no plan B. We will do this and this is how we will do it,'” Robert told him. “He said, ‘We can work with it.'”

Despite initial concerns about the location and its track record, Robert said he finally stopped by.

“How are you? Are you taking a risk or trying to find a different game plan? If you’re working on Plan B, how are you going to work on Plan A?”

However, the new Plan A is much bigger than just a business model.

And the restaurant is more than just a restaurant serving taco burgers out of this world.

“Yes, we serve food, but we’re also here to serve in the community and to raise awareness and support for the community with special needs,” said Robert. “That’s where God put us there for some reason.”

A place that may not be the easiest to get to, but is well worth the trip.

The post An American dream of family, future and good food | Colorado Springs News first appeared on GLENDALE CHERRY CREEK CHRONICLE.

Category: News
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A South African bolt-action hunting rifle
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 05:01:53 GMT
Musgrave Model 90 with scope mounted

The Musgrave company was founded in 1950 and soon made a name for itself for precise, robust and elegant sport rifles for South African hunters and sport shooters. As the political situation eases, their rifles are now also available in other countries and are worth considering.

Modified Mauser bolt system

All of their large-caliber sporting rifles are based on a modified Mauser bolt system that is made from forged steel parts and is sufficient for the most powerful cartridges. The flagship is the Musgrave Model 90, which was available in the versions Standard, De Luxe, Light and Magnum.

design

Part of the Musgrave Model 90 is based on the Mauser K98 and Winchester Model 70. The standard model is equipped with a sporty shaft with a cheek pad and shaft pad. The repeating mechanism is the Musgrave variant of the Mauser, which is characterized by its safety lock, which is attached to the top of the strike plate cover on the back of the lock, where it is conveniently to the pool floor and clearly visible. Iron visors are mounted, the adjustable visor in front of the chamber and the front sight with a hood; The receiver is also drilled and threaded, ready for a Weaver telescopic sight mount.

Musgrave Model 90 L with riflescope and modified Mauser bolt system (Photo: XY)

magazine

The magazine is integrated into the rifle stock in the Mauser style. As mentioned above, the rifle can be chambered for various popular sports cartridges, although the magazine capacity remains the same for all of them.

variants

The Musgrave Model 90 DeLuxe corresponds mechanically to the standard, but with a selected walnut stock and a generally higher processing quality; The company can engrave virtually any form of decoration to order.

Musgrave Model 90 Deluxe with chamber in .308 WinchesterMusgrave Model 90 Deluxe with chamber in .308 Winchester (Photo: XY)

The Musgrave Model 90 Light has a light walnut stock with a ‘beak’ fore-end and the barrel is approx. 50 mm shorter than the standard rifle. Mechanically it corresponds to the standard, but weighs 1 kg less.

The Magnum Model 82 differs in that it is chambered for .375 H&H, .300 Winchester or 7 mm Remington Magnum cartridges; it therefore has a longer action and a trigger guard. Otherwise, it uses the same repeating mechanism as the standard rifle, is fitted with a walnut stock with cheek piece and butt plate, and weighs 8.11 lbs (3.66 kg). This rifle is very popular with big game hunters in South Africa due to its combination of high performance, accuracy and light weight.

Musgrave also makes a line of sporting rifles based on the Muser Kar98 military repeater. These rifles are less expensive, work better than the Musgrave Model 90, and have become widespread across Africa.

Technical specifications
Manufacturer: Musgrave (Pty) Ltd., Bloemfontein, South Africa
Type: Repeater rifle, repeater
Caliber: available in .243, .270, .308, .30-06, 7 × 57 mm and 7 × 64 mm
Barrel: 24 inches (610 mm)
Weight (empty): 9.25 pounds (4.2 kg)
Magazine capacity: 4 rounds

The post A South African bolt-action hunting rifle first appeared on America's Firearms Newsource.

Category: Manufacturer News
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Husqvarna team manager previews World MotoCross season
Tue, 08 Jun 2021 14:51:22 GMT

CHECKING IN WITH RASMUS JORGENSEN

ROCKSTAR ENERGY HUSQVARNA FACTORY RACING’S MX2 TEAM MANAGER SHARES HIS THOUGHTS ON THE UPCOMING SEASON

With the 2021 FIM Motocross World Championship starting in Russia this weekend, Rockstar Energy Husqvarna Factory Racing MX2 team manager Rasmus Jorgensen opens up about the long season ahead, the team’s preparations, and his expectations for each of the riders.

Rasmus, round one of the new season is just days away now. It’s been a long, long time since the final GP of 2020, how did the team adjust its preparation for 2021?

Rasmus: “The biggest thing for us was the uncertainty around when round one would be and knowing when to turn up the intensity with everything. The riders have still been riding a lot, a normal schedule really, but more for maintenance instead of any other focused training, just to keep loose on the bike and maintain their bike fitness. When the current calendar was announced we adapted accordingly and now we’re ready to go racing at round one.”

The team enjoyed a strong end to last season with race wins and plenty of podium results. Did the positivity surrounding that success keep the team’s motivation up through the long off season?

“The motivation within the team is always high and those results certainly gave the team a boost at the time as the hard work had paid off. But the racing never stops and we’re always looking forward to the next race. If we had results that were not where we’d like them to be, the atmosphere in the team was still really good and that’s still the same to this day. Last year was my first time as a team manager and probably the hardest one for anyone to start with because of the pandemic but myself and the team adapted, and overall we had a positive season with lots of great results.”

You mentioned last year was your first as MX2 team manager, what was the most important thing that you learned?

“I think the biggest thing was to not take on too much work. I’ve always been hands on with everything and want everything to be super-perfect, which isn’t always possible if you have a mud race for example. I like to be busy, but I’ve learned to spread the work across the team more, and this is working really well ahead of the season starting.”

Things look to be back as a more traditional style calendar for MXGP this year. Is this something that you welcome, or did you enjoy having multiple races at individual circuits?

“It’s a tough one to say. For example, in Mantova, Thomas and Jed went 1-2 overall at the first round there and that started the ball rolling with their confidence and that carried them through the next two GPs there and more great results followed. But on the other hand, at the first one in Lommel they couldn’t quite get settled and that set the tone for the remaining two rounds there. Their results were good, but it was a tough week. Then they both rebounded in Trentino and the results came back. But overall, Infront did a great job to deliver a racing season last year and we’re excited to be racing all over the world again in 2021.”

For 2021 you have one rider approaching the end of his MX2 career because of the age rule, and one entering his first season in the MX2 World Championship. It must be a challenging dynamic for you?

“Yes, it’s completely different situations with them. Last year, Jed met his goals. He did exactly what he wanted to achieve in having an injury free year, getting on the podium, and finishing the series in the top five. He ticked all the boxes. As 2021 is his final season in MX2, he does have a little more pressure to do well and secure a place on an MXGP team but he’s clearly capable and deserving of one. With Kay, he was strong in EMX250 but MX2 will be a big learning curve for him. He just needs to not overthink things and just ride like he knows he can ride. We believe in him 100%. As it’s his first year, we don’t have any huge expectations for him to perform, which is the complete opposite to Jed.”

Going by what’s shared on social media by your riders, they clearly have a strong bond as they’re often training, cycling, and practicing together. Surely, this creates a really good atmosphere within the whole team?

“What you see is exactly how it is among them. None of it is staged, they’re all great friends. They all support each other and want the best for each other. They push each other in training and keep the mood light. I’m super-lucky to have three riders that get along so well.”

What will it take for Jed to win the MX2 title in 2021? He has the bike, the speed, the talent, and the team behind him. Have you found the final piece of the puzzle during the pre-season that will take him to the top?

“There’s been a couple of things but nothing major. We focused on a couple of specific things with his physical side, and Husqvarna also worked on some bike changes. As we saw last year, the depth of talent in MX2 is deep and starts are so important. When Jed started in the top five he could podium, or win, so he has the speed. He just needs to start up front and be able to race with those guys. There’s been a lot of small changes which we believe will improve Jed as a racer and he’s happy with the direction that we’ve gone, so it’s looking good for an even better season than last year for him.”

What are your expectations for Kay this year? Will it be a year for him to find his feet and see what works and what doesn’t, or do you plan to try and harness his raw speed to ensure consistent results?

“Firstly, it’s important that he just focuses on himself. Then he needs to break down the season race by race, including the qualifying sessions, and if things don’t go well in one moto, to move on immediately and focus on the next race. It will certainly be a learning year for him like it is for any rookie in the MX2 class. He is physically ready, but it’s the mental side that you can only master by competing. Once he has a string of solid results put together, he’ll have momentum on his side and that’s when his results will improve as well as his consistency.”

When the season ends, what would determine a successful year for the team?

“I think both riders finishing top five in the season is certainly possible. Obviously, we want to win, everyone wants to win, but we have to be realistic. But we have the bike and we have talented riders that can achieve great things. For Jed, top three overall in the championship is easily achievable after his success last year and I think Kay can slot in somewhere between fifth and 10th overall should he prove to be consistent. For both Kay and Maxime, 2021 is very much a learning year and there is so much to learn in racing. They both have plenty of time on their side and they will use this season as a building year ahead of 2022. As we enter the season, we have three riders that are all healthy, happy, and ready to go racing. It’s a long season and I strongly believe in all of them. The homework has been done and I know that they will give their best effort in every moto. A new season is always exciting and I can’t wait to see what they can do this year.”

 

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New Black History Entitles in the Blair-Caldwell and Western History Collections at DPL
Tue, 09 Feb 2021 09:35:18 GMT

Dahlia

The Special Collections at Denver Public Library are a great resource for learning more about the lives of African Americans in Colorado and the rest of the United States. Both the Blair-Caldwell African American Research Library and the Western History Collection regularly add new titles that feature the latest in scholarship on African American History to their holdings, as well as older titles that are new to our collections. Here are a few of the titles that have recently been added:

Creating the Black Utopia of Buxton, Iowa by Rachelle Chase (History Press, 2019) – Black pioneers carved out plenty of settlements on the Western Plains including one in Buxton, Iowa. The residents of this Iowa coal community were noteworthy for their progressive approach to race relations, building a town where residents freely co-mingled in churches, schools, and workplaces.  Slavery’s Reach: Southern Slaveholders in the North Star State by Christopher P. Lehman (Minnesota Historical Press, 2019) – Northern Midwestern states like Minnesota aren’t usually in the conversation when it comes to the lasting scars of slavery, but they benefited mightily from the institution. This recent work examines how the profits from slavery were used to build the institutional framework for the “free” state of Minnesota. It’s an astounding story that hasn’t been told until now.  Black Fortunes: The Story of the First Six African Americans Who Survived Slavery and Became Millionaires by Shomari Wills (Amistad, 2018) – It’s difficult to think of a further journey than that of formerly enslaved people who went from bondage to the heights of American capitalism. The six businessmen and women profiled in this work epitomize the great American success story and, by necessity, were textbook entrepreneurs.  White Rage: The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide by Carol Anderson (Bloomsbury, 2016) – The term “White Rage” may be a lightning rod for “controversy,” but post-Civil War “Black Codes,” Jim Crow laws, voter suppression, and violent backlash to civil rights laws are tangible evidence of its existence. Anderson’s meticulous research connects moments of Black progress to inevitable violent backlashes meant to push that progress backward.  The Negro’s Civil War: How American Blacks Felt and Acted During the War for the Union by James McPherson (Vintage Books, 2003) – In nearly every telling of the story of the American Civil War, African Americans are largely depicted as bystanders, but that was hardly the case. In this heavily footnoted edition, McPherson draws out the Black experience during the War, from the struggle for equal pay in the Union Army, to how African Americans viewed Abraham Lincoln.  The Denver School Busing Wars: The History of Denver Public Schools, Volume Two, 1967-1995 by Phil Goodstein (Denver New Social Publications, 2020) – After voting to desegregate Denver Public Schools in 1969, the city of Denver was consumed in a whirlwind of violence, rhetoric, and straight-up chaos. The story of those uneasy days is told by Goodstein in meticulous detail. Unexampled Courage, the Blinding of Sgt. Isaac Woodward and the Awakening of President Harry S. Truman and Judge J. Waties Waring by Richard Gergel (Sarah Crichton Books, 2019) – On his way home from service in World War II, Sgt. Isaac Woodward was pulled from a Greyhound bus and brutally beaten by Batesburg, South Carolina, Police Chief Lynwood Shull. The assault left Sgt Woodward blind and touched off a maelstrom that reached to the highest offices of American life. When then-President Truman heard the story, he was moved to both pursue justice for Sgt. Woodward and, ultimately, desegregate the U.S. Army. Though Shull was acquitted of the crime by an all-white jury, the judge in the case, J. Waites Waring, was so moved that he spent much of the rest of his career advocating for civil rights. 

Though February is Black History Month, there are always plenty of opportunities to learn more about the lives of African Americans via the collections at Denver Public Library year-round. 

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Colorado Governor wants Japanese internment camp to be a National Park
Tue, 18 May 2021 21:20:47 GMT

When you think of national parks, the imagination generally conjures majestic peaks, wild desert landscapes or remote beauty. Not dusty WWII-era barracks that once held Japanese-America internees.

Colorado’s Governor,  Jared Polis sent a letter calling on the National Park Service to support the inclusion of the former Amache Japanese Internment Camp Site near Grenada, Colorado into the National Park system. The National Park Service is currently evaluating the suitability for inclusion of the Amache site into the National Park system through a Special Resource Study. This study represents an early step in the process of designating this site as a National Park site, and was directed by congress via the 2019 John D. Dingell, Jr. Conservation, Management, and Recreation Act. The public may wish to provide public comment during this time, or participate in one of the upcoming public comment sessions that will be held by the National Park Service later this month.

 

“In Colorado, we are fortunate to have twelve national park units that we cherish not only because they ensure our natural wonders are preserved for future generations, but because they also ensure our national history and cultural experience are preserved as well, even when we are called to face dark times in our nation’s past,” said Governor Polis. “Preserving and protecting the Amache site presents a valuable opportunity to better our country, our state, our history and most importantly our future in the spirit of justice, equity and inclusion. It will allow us to interrogate our past, and understand a more complete story of our nation.”

 

The Amache site was one of ten (Polis’ terms it illegal) internment camps created during World War II, where Japanese Americans and assumed Japanese Americans were incarcerated without cause after having been forcibly removed from their homes, communities and daily lives. Amache was a unique site for many reasons, with the distinction of having the most Japanese Americans volunteer to enlist in the military, and in having a rare voice of opposition to the concentration camp in former Governor Ralph L. Carr. As the governor of Colorado at the time, Carr stood largely alone among Western political leaders by taking a strong and public stand against the mass incarceration.

 

Inclusions into the National Park system are done either by an act of congress or by the president, and the Special Resource Study will provide recommendations on those next steps. Should the study support congressional action, Governor Polis will work to support swift passage of designating legislation with the Colorado delegation. Governor Polis also previously expressed support for the inclusion of the Amache site into the National Park system in welcome remarks to the Mile High Japanese American Citizens League’s remembrance day ceremony in February.

Category: Polis
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Furniture Assembly Norwalk CT
Thu, 10 Jun 2021 20:28:03 GMT
Hi Holly!

 Home furnishings retailer Crate and Barrel today announced a partnership with Handy, a leading platform for booking home services, to offer customers professional furniture assembly and home decor installation at over 90 locations across the United States.

A first in retail, Crate and Barrel and CB2 store associates can now work with shoppers to design a fully-furnished room, then direct Handy professionals to assemble and install the entire look for one flat price to create a seamless shopping experience, from start to finish.

Via store associates, customers can book appointments with Handy professionals at any time between 7 a.m. and 11 p.m., seven days a week, to fully assemble furniture or install lighting, window treatments, and other home decor. All Handy services are backed by the Handy Happiness Guarantee.

“As one of the industry’s most respected, innovative retailers, Crate and Barrel knows that shoppers increasingly want to enjoy the items that they purchase without thinking about the work involved in assembling or installing them,” said Oisin Hanrahan, Co-founder and CEO of Handy. “We are thrilled to partner with Crate and Barrel to provide access to professional, convenient installation and assembly services to their customers.”

“At Crate and Barrel, we make it our top priority to create seamless shopping experiences that align with the lifestyles of our customers,” said Suzy Cirulis, VP of Marketing at Crate and Barrel.  “We are excited to work with Handy to offer Crate and Barrel and CB2 shoppers a truly end-to-end retail experience.”

Category: Latest
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Anti-Israel Activists in NYC Call for Violent ‘Intifada, Revolution,’ Israel’s Demise
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 03:47:51 GMT
Anti-Israel Activists in NYC Call for Violent ‘Intifada, Revolution,’ Israel’s Demise

ED JONES / AFP

JOSHUA KLEIN

Shocking footage from a recent anti-Israel demonstration in New York City shows over a thousand protesters gathering behind calls for the fall of Israel while advocating a violent uprising and revolution against the Jewish state.

Footage from Tuesday’s event showed a crowd of pro-Palestinian supporters, some wearing Palestinian symbols such as keffiyeh scarves and waving Palestinian flags, gathered outside the Israeli consulate in Manhattan.

While some carry signs attacking “US imperialism” calling for boycotts and a halt to US aid to Israel, others call for full-blown violence.

One sign read, “Support the Palestinian Resistance” with a picture of a young man who appeared to be striking a stone, while another read, “There is only one solution: Intifada, revolution”. Both signs bore the logo of “Within Our Lifetime” (WOL), a New York-based Palestinian anti-terror group responsible for the demonstration.

Anti-Zionist rally in NYC on Tuesday.

Speakers describe a conspiracy by the Zionist media against Palestinians, the threat of “Zionist” institutions “peppered” in New York, openly support Hamas terrorism and sing for the extermination of Israel.

This is an anti-Semitic ideology: pic.twitter.com/D9QIfmwj1Z

– The Conspiracy Slander (@ConspiracyLibel) June 17, 2021

The rally’s violent calls were reflected in the rhetoric of its central spokeswoman, WOL Chair Nerdeen Kiswani, who was named Anti-Semite of the Year by Stopantisemitism.org last year after multiple incidents of terrorist glorification, threats of violence and allegations Spreading hatred “by disguising it as criticism of Israel”.

Kiswani is also the former president of the Radical Students for Justice in Palestine (SJP) branch of the City of New York University (CUNY), whose activists reportedly physically assaulted, intimidated and harassed Jewish students on campus.

Leading the crowd with a loudspeaker, Kiswani said, “We marched through the streets because there are dozens of Zionist institutions in this city that are raising money to fund settlements.”

She claimed that Gaza was “in constant genocide” and also defended the Palestinian right to “oppose” Israel’s existence.

“So the people of Gaza and the people of Palestine always had a right to resist – be it against the siege and blockade or against the creation of the existence of Israel,” she said.

“We must support the right of the Palestinians to oppose this by any means necessary,” she added.

Support for “resistance” largely relates to the ongoing “holy war” against the Jewish state. The name “Hamas”, the US-designated terrorist organization that currently rules Gaza, is an acronym for “Islamic Resistance Movement”.

Kiswani openly called for a violent uprising or an intifada against the Jewish state and sang chants of “There is only one solution: intifada, revolution”.

Kiswani also criticized “Fox News, the New York Times, CNN and all these other mainstream media outlets that continue to lie about our people, lie about our struggle, hide and defend Israel from accountability,” leading to boos from the crowd at that Media led.

Several of the crowd’s chants were also captured on film.

A chant, “Zionists, You Will Learn: Refugees Will Return,” referred to those Palestinians who largely left their homes in anticipation of the 1948 Arab war against the nascent Jewish state, and many followed calls from Arab leaders to avoid them advancing armies.

In other chants, demonstrators made it clear that they were not interested in coexistence with a Jewish state, but were instead looking for a Palestinian one.

“We don’t want two states; we want everything! ”came a chant that negated Israel’s right to exist.

Another chant, “From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free” also ruled out Israel’s existence.

At one point the crowd also broke out shouting for an intifada. “Intifada, Intifada!” shouted the crowd as they marched through downtown Manhattan.

At another point, a pro-Palestinian protester warned: “If you do al-Aqsa. touch, [mosque], we’re going to wreak havoc…. We’re going to make World War III so we can rid him of you … just like [Crusade-era Islamic leader] Salah-ad-Din. “

After the rally, protesters marched to Union Square.

The rabid anti-Israel coalition, NY4Palestine, which leads many of the protests in New York City that led to violence against Jews, was one of the main organizers of the rally.

The coalition includes Al-Awda: The Palestinian Coalition for the Right of Return, which “supports the struggle for the liberation of Palestine” against “racism and discrimination inherent in Zionist ideology” and has regularly invited convicted terrorists to its events while high-ranking Members of the group have expressed support for violence against Israelis and have been accused of anti-Semitism on social media.

The radical Soros-funded Alliance for Global Justice (AFGJ) is a “financial sponsor” of NY4Palestine’s Palestine Freedom Fund, which was “the first initiative” to raise nearly $ 20,000 to fund legal costs for Palestinian protesters who participated in Anti-Semitic demonstrations took place in violence against Jews in Midtown Manhattan in May.

The US recently faced an outbreak of anti-Semitic attacks against Jews in New York City and other cities across the country, largely due to pro-Palestinian agitation.

Last month, pro-Palestinian protesters were filmed attacking Jews in Manhattan – allegedly harassing and beating pro-Israel counter-demonstrators; Shooting fireworks at a crowd of spectators; and spit on guests eating at a local restaurant.

In addition, a small explosive was thrown from a pickup truck in the Diamond District – a predominantly Jewish neighborhood – causing concerned bystanders to run to safety. The pickup was part of a convoy of vehicles waving Palestinian flags, sources said.

Breitbart

The post Anti-Israel Activists in NYC Call for Violent ‘Intifada, Revolution,’ Israel’s Demise first appeared on Gotham Weekly.

Category: Violent
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M. DeRose Obituary (2021) – Madison, WI
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 07:31:20 GMT
Gary Burns Obituary (1939 - 2021) - Kenosha, WI

M. Jeanne DeRose

June 10, 1937 – June 17, 2021

MADISON – M. Jeanne DeRose, 84 years old, died on June 17, 2021. Jeanne was born on June 10, 1937 in Kenosha, Wisconsin, to Rollin and Edna (Grubel) Hansen. She loved her family, friends, and gathering people around her. Jeanne graduated from Mary D. Bradford High School (Kenosha) in 1954 and Milton College (English) in 1958. She met her love and life partner Paul Amadeo DeRose in Madison and married in 1961 on her birthday in Kenosha, where they both grew up.

Jeanne worked on many projects mainly focused on writing, organizing and making friends. She was initially employed by the Kenosha News and the Milwaukee Journal. She worked with the Institute for Research on Poverty (UW), was a writer and editor for the WI DOT’s Mass Transit Planning Unit, and worked with Harout Sanasarian, a Milwaukee Democratic MP. She was involved in the Community Cable Collaboration Project in Milwaukee and, in later years, in ElderCare of Dane County.

Jeanne was involved in numerous social and political activities. She was president of the Lake Wingra Community Council and spokesperson for the WI Coalition for Balanced Transportation. In 1976 she took part in the presidential campaign for Jimmy Carter, whom she loved as a grassroots organization, which consisted of the old station office on West Washington Ave convent and an elector. In 1988 she was WI delegate for Al Gore at the Democratic National Convention. She continued to campaign, advocate grassroots methods that involve local communities, and knock on doors across the state. She and her friends were members of the National Women’s Political Caucus, and in 2001 she represented the NWPC at its WI conference “Women in Politics Empowering Women in the Political Process”.

Jeanne had a big heart and a big mind. She mainly liked to gather people around her to sit and talk. She was spirited and at times a passionate supporter of friends and loved ones. She loved going to art shows or gardening stores in WI with her sisters, and her purchases always reminded her of that. In later years she adopted two large (over 100 pounds) senior dogs and gave each one a spacious, comfortable home. The family thanks Jeanne’s neighbors for their patience as Otis-san and Sam went on a tour.

Jeanne leaves her daughter Dr. Victoria J. DeRose (Dr. Paul J. Wallace) of Eugene, OR; Sisters Vickie M. Burton and Judy Ann (Den) Adler, niece Morgan Burton (Rich) Schultz and Carol (Baternik) Labashosky (Brian), nephew Eric (Shauna) Adler, and several other relatives and good friends across the country. Her husband, Paul A. DeRose, on May 12, 2002, and too many dear friends preceded her in death.

A memorial service will take place on Saturday, June 26, 2021, from 2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. at CRESS FUNERAL HOME, 3610 Speedway Road, Madison.

Instead of flowers, the family suggests donations to a local grassroots campaign, animal shelter, or artists’ association.

Cress funeral & cremation

3610 Speedway Street

(608) 238-3434

Please share memories below

Published by Kenosha News on June 21, 2021.

The post M. DeRose Obituary (2021) - Madison, WI first appeared on Daily Badger Bulletin.

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Murder charges in disappearance Colorado woman
Thu, 27 May 2021 22:18:05 GMT

An arrest in one Colorado’s most high profile disappearance.

Barry Morphew, 53, was arrested Wednesday in connection with his wife’s disappearance. He faces charges of first-degree murder after deliberation and attempt to influence a public servant.

The 49-year-old mother of two went for a bike ride May 10, 2020, in Maysville, and hasn’t been seen since.

“Our belief is that Suzanne is not alive at this time,” said Chaffee County Sheriff John Spezze.

Her cause of death is not known, Spezze said.

Her husband’s arrest is sealed and the details of this case will not be disclosed as the investigation is ongoing, District Attorney Linda Stanley said.

Barry Morphew posted a video on social media a week after his wife’s disappearance, and announced a $100,000 reward for her safe return with “no questions asked.”

The FBI and Colorado Bureau of Investigation contributed to the Chaffee County Sheriff’s search.

Morphew went for her bike ride on Mother’s Day near County Road 225 and West Highway 50 and never returned, her family said.

Law enforcement teams used helicopters, drones, divers and canine search crews for months in the attempt to find Suzanne.Investigators said that one of her “personal items” was recovered during one of the searches, but didn’t disclose what the item was.

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EDITORIAL: Assist our youngsters take a leap ahead at school | bonus
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 08:32:16 GMT
EDITORIAL: Help our children take a leap forward in school |  bonus

Endorsement by two of Colorado’s most respected education governors – Republican Bill Owens and Democrat Bill Ritter – makes a strong case for a nomination to provide serious educational support for Colorado’s most vulnerable children.

The proposal for Learning Enrichment and Academic Progress (LEAP) – tentatively titled Initiative 25 on the way to a nationwide vote this fall – would fund families to choose comprehensive complementary learning support for their children beyond the classroom.

You could choose from a hodgepodge of recognized out-of-school learning providers, including tutors for reading, math, science, and writing; Offers for students with special needs as well as vocational and vocational training programs. And that’s just a partial list.

Each household could receive up to $ 1,500 per child for such out-of-class assistance. Priority would be given to children from low-income households.

Former governors. Owens and Ritter were advocates of educational choice and reform during their respective tenures. Both praised the proposal this week, our news partner Colorado Politics reported.

“This nation’s first initiative to help fill the opportunity gap that has grown during the pandemic unites Coloradans regardless of their political leanings or where they live,” Owens said.

“That’s because they understand that the future of so many of our young people – who are our future workers, employers and community leaders – is at stake.”

Ritter said the proposal could help eliminate socio-economic divisions in the state’s public schools.

“All too often, in Colorado, a student’s success is related to their background, family income, and background,” he said. “This is particularly true of access to extra-curricular learning opportunities, where a growing ‘opportunity gap’ fuels different academic outcomes – the ‘achievement gap’ – which are largely based on socio-economic factors.”

Funding for the proposal would come in part from the Colorado State Trust’s land holdings, which have historically been administered and used to support public education and other government institutions. Funding would also come through a 5% sales tax on retail marijuana sales. The tax would raise an estimated $ 137.6 million per year.

Legalized recreational marijuana naturally places a burden on our state, especially on our children, although it also generates tax revenue for public services.

Pot poses a growing danger to children, given the myriad of easy-to-hide forms it can be purchased in and the increasing potency of its psychoactive ingredient. In addition, a growing body of research shows the serious psychological damage and learning impairments that can result from the use of cannabis among teenagers and adolescents.

A modest tax on marijuana sales to fund an initiative that actually helps kids would be a refreshing change. It is arguably the least we can do to have some of the collateral damage for Colorado’s children, families and communities paid for through legal recreational funds.

As noted in the Colorado Politics report, educational research shows that tutoring and other after-school programs can help fill the achievement gap. A study by Rand Corporation found these services and programs “provide measurable benefits” and “have been shown to improve academic outcomes.”

The proposal calls for tutors and other after-school services to be certified. Public school teachers who are pre-certified by their school district would be given priority in providing tutoring and other additional support outside of the classroom.

To receive the November ballot action, supporters must collect at least 124,632 validated signatures from Colorado voters by August 2.

Initiative 25 has won the support of dozens of political and community figures, as well as educational leaders. They come from all over Colorado and from across the political spectrum. These include State Sens. James Coleman, D-Denver, and Paul Lundeen, R-Monument; former Senator and State Treasurer Mark Hillman; CEO of Gary Community Investments and former Democratic Senator Mike Johnston and groups like the Colorado Alliance for Environmental Education, Colorado Succeeds, RESCHOOL, Thorne Nature Experience and Transform Education Now.

Papa Dia, founder and CEO of the Aurora-based African Leadership Group, was an early proponent.

“This initiative helps improve the playing field and improve those for whom there are too few options,” said Dia. “With LEAP, we can reduce the gap in opportunities between rich and poor, between students from homes where English is not spoken as their first or primary language, and between those who attend high-performing schools and those who don’t.”

LEAP promises to be a big step for Colorado’s children.

The editorial staff of the Gazette

The post EDITORIAL: Assist our youngsters take a leap ahead at school | bonus first appeared on Education News Colorado.

Category: Colorado Springs Schools
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Real estate technology and the real estate industry – TechBullion
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 04:53:03 GMT
Damon Woodward Explains How Real Estate Investing Can Mean a Better Life for Everyone in the Community

Property Technology has revolutionized the real estate market worldwide. It has revolutionized the entire real estate industry more. Technology played an important role in its creation. The advancement in information technology has allowed the real estate industry to expand much faster and provide better services and customer satisfaction. These qualities today include information technology, computer science, business administration, finance and other related fields. The developer has become very efficient and has increased his profit margin many times over.

Real estate technologies enable real estate companies to effectively and efficiently extend their services to the consumer market. In the real estate industry, the number of investments has increased enormously, which has led to numerous start-ups and a significant growth spurt in the number of companies active in the sector. Real estate technology was an important part of it and the founders of the coworking company Prop-tech definitely managed to bring it all together.

The main idea behind real estate technology development was to use advanced computer software and innovative business models to create an environment that would bring together the assets of investors and entrepreneurs under one roof. That was an excellent idea and is at the core of the Prop-Tech coworking company’s success. Real estate technology enables investors and entrepreneurs to find, manage and use their valuable assets easily and inexpensively. The best part about the whole idea is that it has been tested over a long period of time and has shown positive results. Many of the investors and entrepreneurs have already benefited from the innovative business models of the Property Technology Company.

House with pool

Commercial real estate investors can now benefit from the same innovative real estate technology solutions that commercial real estate investors have used to improve their business. The innovative real estate technology offers a comprehensive set of instruments that helps entrepreneurs and investors to manage their assets cost-effectively. This means that not only real estate investors but also commercial property owners benefit from these innovative solutions. However, the Property Technology Company’s greatest strength is that they have managed to incorporate various techniques and solutions to improve the overall performance and bottom line of the property investment business. In short, the company’s real estate technology is capable of transforming the real estate investment business into something better, faster, and more profitable.

Real estate investors can leverage the real estate technology company’s intelligent building software solutions that help them build, manage and maintain their properties in the most cost-effective way possible. In fact, their real estate investment portfolio is becoming more profitable because of the innovative software solutions they develop. An important part of the real estate investment business is making sure your building stays top-notch and is the safest and most reliable on the market. The building software solutions from prophecy are designed to make your building smarter, more efficient and more reliable in every respect.

As landlords who invest in real estate, it is always a difficult task for them to make their real estate asset class safe and reliable. That makes the task even more challenging for investors. On the one hand, investors need to make sure they are choosing a quality real estate technology solution from a reputable real estate company. On the other hand, landlords also have to take care of various things, such as maintaining the building on time, repairing small damage as quickly as possible, maximizing rental income and so on. Therefore, the combination of the best property tech solution and the right landlord is the recipe for success for investors and landlords.

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Addressable TV’s Supergroup; EU To Probe Google’s Advert Tech Enterprise
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 05:22:49 GMT
Addressable TV’s Supergroup; EU To Probe Google's Ad Tech Business

Here is today’s recap of AdExchanger.com news … would you like it to be emailed? Login here.

Addressable supergroup

Some marketers are pushing their TV partners to act more than the big digital companies that allow them to target ads to specific audiences. To meet this need, TV distributors Comcast, Charter Communications, Altice, Dish Media and Vizio have teamed up to form eight companies to form a consortium called Go Addressable. It’s part of an effort to drive addressable TV advertising and make it easier to navigate a fragmented landscape. The Wall Street Journal reports. That was a challenge in the streaming ecosystem, where advertisers need to compile inventory from multiple streaming services, smart TV companies, cable operators and programmers in order to accurately target viewers. Go Addressable does not develop advertising technology to solve these challenges, but rather identifies problems and tries to find solutions. On the planning side, for example, companies intend to share the available scope across different targeting parameters, companies and systems and transfer this information to their planning tools.

Euro-approved

The European antitrust authorities are not done with Google yet. A week after Google agreed to pay a $ 268 million fine and make changes to its advertising business to resolve a competition case in France, Reuters reports that the European Union will conduct a formal investigation into the lucrative one before the end of the year Google’s digital advertising business will usher in the year. Google generated $ 147 billion in online advertising revenue last year – more than any other company in the world. Ads on its websites, including Search, YouTube, and Gmail, made up the bulk of its sales and profits. About 16% of sales came from the display or network business. The EU’s investigation appears to go deeper than the French antitrust case and could end up targeting Google’s entire advertising empire, with antitrust authorities in the block focusing on the company’s position vis-à-vis advertisers, publishers, intermediaries and competitors. These competitors claim that Google is exploiting its reliance on buyers, sellers and intermediaries for its products and services to charge high fees from all parties, giving it an unfair edge over the competition. [Related in AdExchanger: Antitrust Regulators Are Turning Up The Heat On Big Tech. Here’s Your Cheat Sheet]

Programmatic representation

To increase spending on programmatic advertising among minority publishers, the GroupM holding company has joined the “Underrepresented Voices” initiative of ad tech company TripleLift. Ad Age Reports. The curated deal runs exclusively on the websites of operators of Black, Latinx, AAPI and LGBTQ + media companies. TripleLift said it waived its fees to allow more dollars to go directly to publishers. Supporting minority-owned publishers has become increasingly important among media buyers as businesses focus on social equality issues. GroupM also recently announced its Responsible Investment Framework initiative, which encouraged customers to invest 2% or more of their total media spend in black-owned media companies. Continue reading.

Obtain advertising

Instagram advertises in its TikTok clone Reels. Ads in the short video service appear in a loop for up to 30 seconds – full screen and vertical – and between the individual posts, CNBC reports. The ads come almost a year after the reels started. YouTube, which launched its copycat named Shorts, has also caught up with TikTok. Why all the fuss? A eMarketer report was released this month said that adult TikTok users will spend more time on TikTok than adults Facebook Users spend this year on Facebook, which owns Instagram. According to the same report, TikTok is set to garner more Gen Z users than Instagram this year. But while TikTok is ahead at the front of the audience, Facebook is way ahead when it comes to advertising. Facebook has sophisticated advertising technology and a number of marketers who, of course, spend money on its platform – and that gives it an edge over new players.

But wait, there’s more!

New antitrust laws could force Facebook and Google to have more data access – and prevent them from giving preference to their own services. [Digiday]

The week without cookies: Procter & Gamble has a cookieless. announced cross-platform measurement test, [Ad Age], and Contentsquare has launched its first cookie-less Experience Analytics solution. [release]

Zeroing the Android Advertising ID will only affect 2% of devices worldwide, according to Singular. [blog]

The ad tech company DigitalReef was founded on June 17th with the aim of as a large-scale mobile marketing and advertising platform. [release]

NBC is talking to prospective advertisers about a price of $ 6 million per 30-second ad during the Super Bowl, which marks a new high in the pricing of ads during the Big Game. [Variety]

Zoomers love games. According to Tapjoy, around 86% of Generation Z members use mobile devices as gaming platforms. [VentureBeat]

MadHive licenses data from HyphaMetrics, a newly formed measurement company with a panel of 100 households that tracks media usage at the individual level across devices. [Broadcasting + Cable]

You are set

Kubient has hired Mike Gavigan and Mark St. Amour as VPs of Performance Media.[release]

Alpha Foods has hired Kierstin De West as its first CMO. [release]

ID Comms has hired Victoria Potter as its Global Assurance Director. [release]

The post Addressable TV’s Supergroup; EU To Probe Google’s Advert Tech Enterprise first appeared on DAILY ZSOCIAL MEDIA NEWS.
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New at No. 1: Hilderbrand’s novel and a look at slavery’s legacy
Sun, 20 Jun 2021 12:13:07 GMT

1. Golden girl

by Elin Hilderbrand. A writer from Nantucket has one last summer to see what happens in the great afterlife.

2. Malibu uprising

by Taylor Jenkins Reid. Four famous siblings are throwing an epic party to celebrate the end of summer. But in the course of 24 hours, your life will change forever.

3. The last thing he told me

by Laura Dave. Hannah Hall discovers truths about her missing husband and connects with his daughter from a previous relationship.

4. Sooley

by John Grisham. Samuel Sooleymon receives a North Carolina Central basketball scholarship and decides to bring his family out of civil war-ravaged South Sudan.

5. Legacy

by Nora Roberts. Threats escalate in rhymes and from changing locations as the daughter of a successful fitness star grows her own yoga business.

6. The other black girl

by Zakiya Dalila Harris. Tension unfolds when two young black women meet in front of the gleaming white background of the New York book publisher.

7. The midnight library

by Matt Haig. Nora Seed finds a library beyond the edge of the universe that contains books with multiple possibilities of the life one could have lived.

8. Ave Maria project

by Andy Weir. Ryland Grace wakes up from a long sleep, alone and far from home, with the fate of humanity resting on his shoulders.

9. The hill we climb

by Amanda Gorman. The poem read on President Joe Biden’s inauguration day by the youngest poet to write and perform an inaugural poem.

10. While righteousness sleeps

by Stacey Abrams. When Justice Wynn falls into a coma, attorney Avery Keene is forced to uncover evidence of a controversial case.

1. How the word is passed on

by Clint Smith. An Atlantic employee examines the legacy of slavery and its impact on centuries of American history.

2. The mob. kill

by Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard. The tenth book in the “Killing” series by the conservative commentator deals with organized crime in the United States in the 20th century.

3. What happened to you?

by Bruce D. Perry and Oprah Winfrey. An approach to dealing with trauma that shifts an essential question to investigate.

4. After the fall

from Ben Rhodes. A former White House adviser and close confidante of President Barack Obama traveled the world to find out how much America’s fingerprints are on the world we have formed.

5. The premonition

by Michael Lewis. Stories of skeptics who opposed the Trump administration’s official response to the COVID-19 outbreak. Profiles include a local health officer and a group of doctors nicknamed Wolverines.

6. The Anthropocene at a Glance

by John Green. A collection of personal essays that shed light on various facets of the human-centered planet.

7. Green light

by Matthew McConaughey. The Oscar-winning actor shares excerpts from the diaries he has kept over the past 35 years.

8. The bomber mafia

by Malcolm Gladwell. A look at the key players and results of precision bombing during World War II.

9. Someone’s daughter

by Ashley C. Ford. A treatise on how a poor black girl grew up in Indiana with a family split from incarceration.

10. Untamed

by Glennon Doyle. The activist and speaker describes her journey of listening to her inner voice.

New York Times

Houston Chronicle Contributor

The post New at No. 1: Hilderbrand's novel and a look at slavery's legacy first appeared on DAILYZ HEALTH NEWS.

Category: Yoga Enterprise
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Keilar and Berman call out GOP who voted against honoring police
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 09:47:00 GMT


CNN's Brianna Keilar and John Berman roll the tape on the 21 Republicans who had previously expressed their public support for police and voted against awarding the Capitol police a Congressional Gold Medal for protecting the Capitol during the January 6 insurrection.
#BriannaKeilar #JohnBerman #NewDay

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Much less frequent beer deliveries go away many bars in San Francisco drafted – CBS San Francisco
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 02:48:52 GMT
Less frequent beer deliveries leave many bars in San Francisco drafted - CBS San Francisco

SAN FRANCISCO (KPIX) – San Francisco has reopened so it’s a great time to check out some of the city’s famous pubs. But when guests get there, they may find that their favorite beer is no longer available on tap. One possible reason for this is an uproar among the town’s bar owners and they are determined to fix that.

“It’s important that I have this Anchor Steam for (bar regular) Victor or the Old Speckled Hen for Keith,” said Shea Shawnson, general manager of Elixir at 16th and Guerrero in the Mission District, which is reputedly the second oldest bar in town is. (The old ship on Pacific Ave. is a few years older.)

CONTINUE READING: Oakland Lake Merritt Juneteenth celebrations overshadowed by deadly mass shootings

In a bar as old as Elixir, familiarity is sacred. On the heels of the pandemic, that was a challenge.

“This is where we store all the barrels,” explained Shawnson, who was standing in the bar’s walk-in cooler. “There is no other place to keep the barrels. Ideally, beer comes cold and stays cold. You don’t want to get it cold, warm, cold. That’s not good for beer. “

Like many of the city’s older bars, Elixir has limited storage space and that’s a big problem now as one of the area’s largest beer retailers, Golden Brands, made some changes. For example, Elixir used to have beer delivered once a week. Then every two weeks.

“Those two weeks recently turned to … every month,” said Shawnson. “So that’s four weeks of beer that I have to store.”

“I get deliveries twice a week from many of my distributors,” said Maria Davis, owner of St. Mary’s Pub in Bernal Heights.

St. Mary’s is another older, smaller bar. With nowhere to store the beer for a month, Davis had no choice but to give away beers she could only get from Golden Brands.

“Big one,” she says. “Miller, PBR, Modelo, Corona.”

It also affects none other than San Francisco’s own Anchor Brewing, and its famous Anchor Steam and other beers are now disappearing from taps across town.

CONTINUE READING: Willow fire growth near Big Sur slows overnight, still containing zero percent Con

“We don’t have it,” Davis said of Anchor, although there is a sign in the bar window promising its availability. “We don’t have any Golden Brands products. I would love to. People ask about it. We have people who work for Anchor. “

“If I have to, I’ll go to Anchor Steam and pick up the kegs myself,” says Shawnson.

Because it was a close community, it wasn’t long before dozens of bar owners realized that this frustration was shared across San Francisco.

“Then I thought, ‘Why are we all sitting here and taking this?'” Davis said. “So I wrote a post that said, ‘Hey, let’s do something about it.'”

More than 80 bars in San Francisco signed a letter asking Golden Brands to make changes.

“It feels like it’s a small business pinch,” said Shawnson.

They say all they want is a return to normal for their businesses and their regular customers.

“I can’t wait to have a Miller high life,” said Davis. “I’m trying to be Miller High Life’s Erin Brockovich.”

MORE NEWS: UPDATE: 1 dead, 6 wounded in shooting Saturday night at Lake Merritt, Oakland

KPIX has contacted Golden Brands several times in the past few weeks. The company has not yet responded. The bar owners who teamed up to write the letter say they are still trying to reach some sort of settlement with the company and hope that there will be a solution eventually.

The post Much less frequent beer deliveries go away many bars in San Francisco drafted - CBS San Francisco first appeared on DAILY CALIFORNIA PRESS.

Category: San Francisco
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Engine No. 1’s big win over Exxon shows activist hedge funds joining fight against climate change
Sat, 19 Jun 2021 15:43:05 GMT
Engine No. 1 wants Exxon to focus less on fossil fuels. AP Photo/Matthew Brown

One of the most expensive Wall Street shareholder battles on record could signal a big shift in how hedge funds and other investors view sustainability.

Exxon Mobil Corp. has been fending off a so-called proxy fight from a hedge fund known as Engine No. 1, which blames the energy giant’s poor performance in recent years on its failure to transition to a “decarbonizing world.” In a May 26, 2021 vote, Exxon shareholders approved at least two of the four board members Engine No. 1 nominated, dealing a major blow to the oil company. The vote is ongoing, and more of the hedge fund’s nominees may also soon be appointed.

While its focus has been on shareholder value, Engine No. 1 says it was also doing this to save the planet from the ravages of climate change. It has been pushing for a commitment from Exxon to carbon neutrality by 2050.

As business sustainability scholars, we can’t recall another time that an energy company’s shareholder – particularly a hedge fund – has been so effective and forceful in showing how a company’s failure to take on climate change has eroded shareholder value. That’s why we believe this vote marks a turning point for investors, who are well placed to nudge companies toward more sustainable business practices.

Hedge funds to the rescue?

Climate strategies aimed at saving the planet are an odd play for a hedge fund. Such investment firms are better known for getting companies to stop investing in this type of thing so they can collect quick profits.

Recent research undertaken by one of us found that activist hedge funds tend to target companies that spend more of their resources on these types of sustainability initiatives. That is, they buy shares of a company to gain influence and then convince other investors to join them in demanding efficiency enhancements and cost-cutting protocols to return more cash to shareholders. A follow-up study found that companies cut spending on sustainability initiatives within five years of a hedge fund getting involved.

In other words, hedge funds focus on short-term returns – not long-term concerns such as climate change or even a company’s own future profitability. And this is because of how hedge funds fundamentally operate.

Hedge funds usually charge their investors – often wealthy individuals and institutional investors – a 1% to 2% management fee in addition to a 20% cut of any gain in their investments. In return, these clients expect quick and substantial returns that substantially outperform the market.

Engine No. 1, a new type of hedge fund?

This is what makes Engine No. 1’s fight so interesting.

It began in early December 2020, shortly after tech investor Chris James launched Engine No. 1 with two other hedge fund industry veterans. The firm said it was “purpose-built to create long-term value by harnessing the power of capitalism.”

Engine No. 1’s first order of business was to pick a fight with one of the world’s largest energy companies, Exxon Mobil. It sent a letter to the company’s board on Dec. 7, 2020, urging it to focus on clean energy and shake up its board of directors – a bold move for an upstart investment firm with just a 0.02% stake in the nearly US$250 billion company.

But Exxon was an obvious target for this strategy. It has been a laggard on developing low-carbon fuels for years and has promoted misinformation about the human impact on climate change for decades.

After Exxon refused to commit to a transition to carbon neutrality, Engine No. 1 formally launched its proxy battle in March to force a change of strategy at the company, which traces its history back to 1870, when John D. Rockefeller founded the Standard Oil Company.

A proxy battle is when a group of shareholders tries to garner enough support from other investors – in the form of votes – to force a company to do what it wants, whether it’s to cut costs or change strategy.

Exxon said it expected to spend $35 million more than its usual costs to deal with the proxy battle; unfortunately, by increasing Exxon’s expenses, these are costs that are actually footed by investors. Engine No. 1 put its expenses at $30 million. The total cost, by some estimates, has exceeded $100 million.

Engine No. 1 was hoping to replace a third of the oil giant’s board of directors with four individuals who have more clean energy experience. The hedge fund was also seeking corporate governance reforms, a review of Exxon’s climate action plan – and its impact on the company’s finances – and greater public disclosure of its environmental and lobbying activities.

Even before the vote, the campaign was already changing the way Exxon does business. In the past few months, Exxon has proposed a $100 billion carbon capture project in Houston and committed $3 billion to low-emission technologies through a new venture.

Though Exxon denies any of these investments were due to pressure from Engine No. 1, it’s hard to believe the hedge fund wasn’t a catalyst. These are some of the biggest investments Exxon has proposed in sustainability in recent years, and they came right after pressure from the hedge fund – as well as the election of a new U.S. president who has made fighting climate change a priority.

Another likely reason for the new initiatives is that Engine No. 1’s campaign was enlisting significant support from other major Exxon investors, such as the California Public Employees’ Retirement System and the New York State Common Retirement Fund, which laid additional pressure on Exxon to do something about its lagging sustainability strategy.

So despite its pushback against Engine No. 1 and its proposed climate plan, clearly Exxon Mobil’s attention to its sustainability plans has been piqued.

What it all means

So why is Engine No. 1 really doing this – and do its motives matter?

While the firm is pushing hard for more investment in sustainability and clean energy, the focus in its statements on what’s driving this fight is mostly about shareholder value. And many of its demands, such as better long-term capital allocation strategy, a plan to enhance shareholder value and a “misaligned” management compensation, are straight out of a typical hedge fund’s playbook.

What we see as fundamentally different here is the emphasis the hedge fund is putting on the connection between sustainability and long-term profits. It makes a strong case that the reason Exxon’s financial position has been deteriorating is because of its failure to invest in low-carbon technologies.

Or, like a hedge fund, Exxon has been focusing on the short-term gains from fossil fuels at the expense of its long-term future in a global economy that puts a premium on sustainability and a penalty on carbon-intensive activities.

Moreover, the readiness of so many major investors – including the three largest U.S. pension funds and BlackRock, the world’s biggest investment manager with $7.4 trillion in assets under management – in joining Engine No. 1 shows which way the winds are blowing, which Exxon seems to now also realize.

So the vote itself isn’t the story here. It’s that the weight of activist hedge funds – the most potent form of shareholder activism – seems to be shifting in favor of sustainability. As we see it, this means companies and executives that don’t invest in the transition low-carbon energy will increasingly risk incurring their wrath.

[Over 100,000 readers rely on The Conversation’s newsletter to understand the world. Sign up today.]

The authors do not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organization that would benefit from this article, and have disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.

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Phoenix Group believes it has secured an insurance industry first
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 08:13:08 GMT
Phoenix Group believes it has secured an insurance industry first

Phoenix Group is the first UK insurer to join the global Partnership for Carbon Accounting Financials (PCAF), according to Phoenix.

“We are pleased to be the first UK insurer to join PCAF as we continue to make progress towards our net zero exposure to our investment portfolio in 2050,” said Michael Eakins, Phoenix Chief Investment Officer.

“By making a PCAF commitment,” he continued, “we ensure that we use best market practices when calculating the GHG emissions of our investment portfolio, and we encourage others within the financial services ecosystem to do the same to do.

“At Phoenix, we know that a greener, more sustainable future requires collaboration across the financial sector, and we are ready to do our part.”

The greenhouse gas accounting methods developed by PCAF were found to be applicable to financial institutions with exposures to listed stocks and corporate bonds, corporate and unlisted stocks, project finance, mortgages, commercial real estate, and automotive loans.

Phoenix’s announcement highlighted that PCAF currently represents financial institutions with total assets greater than $ 40 trillion in lending and investing.

“We are pleased to welcome the Phoenix Group to the 120+ financial institutions worldwide participating in PCAF,” commented Giel Linthorst, Executive Director of PCAF.

“The addition of the Phoenix Group to the growing number of insurers participating in PCAF underscores the diversity of financial institutions that are committed to measuring and disclosing their financed emissions according to the PCAF standard.”

The post Phoenix Group believes it has secured an insurance industry first first appeared on Arizona Daily Press.

Category: Phoenix
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TikTok Star Nathan Apodaca Is Launching His Personal Alcoholic Cranberry Drink
Sun, 20 Jun 2021 16:14:35 GMT
TikTok Star Nathan Apodaca Is Launching His Own Alcoholic Cranberry Drink

Almost a year after going viral with his charming TikTok video set for Fleetwood Mac’s “Dreams”, Nathan “Doggface” Apodaca is launching his own cranberry-flavored alcoholic beverage.

TMZ reports that Apodaca is partnering with BeatBox to create a signature drink called Cranberry Dreams Cosmo. The drink costs $ 3.99 and contains 11.1% alcohol, which is the equivalent of four light beers, TMZ notes. The drink was launched in 2,000 liquor, grocery and convenience stores on Sunday (June 20), including chains like Circle K and Kroger. It will also be made available online later this month.

As you already know, Apodaca became an online phenomenon last year after posting a TikTok skateboarding on an Idaho highway while drinking Ocean Spray cranberry juice, which went to Fleetwood Mac’s hit song “Dreams.” was set.

Not long after the clip went viral, Ocean Spray, grateful for the impromptu promotion, gave Apodaca a brand new truck full of its beloved cranberry-flavored juice. He later put together a selection of songs for a “Songs To Skate To” Tidal playlist with “Dreams” and countless other great tracks.

“It’s just crazy. I am blessed and happy to be able to bless those around me, ”Apodaca told People in November of his newfound fame and the thousands of donations he has received. “I never thought that something like this would happen from the video. I am just blessed that it is happening. “

The post TikTok Star Nathan Apodaca Is Launching His Personal Alcoholic Cranberry Drink first appeared on DAILY ZSOCIAL MEDIA NEWS.
Category: TikTok
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Counterculture on the hill-shaped boulder – Colorado Hometown Weekly
Sun, 20 Jun 2021 23:56:47 GMT
Counterculture on the hill-shaped boulder

The counterculture movement around University Hill in the late 1960s and early 1970s was instrumental in developing Boulder’s unique character.

Many know rock’n’roll and hippies from this time. Students and other young people gathering on Hill in Boulder found great nightlife, with 3.2% beer served by the mug and clubs with the best rock and roll bands.

But the counterculture scene also encompassed alternative ideas and alternative lifestyles.

Young liberals found community in bookstores like Jabberwock and Brillig Works, both of which became social centers.

Tim Fuller bought the Brillig Works Bookstore in the late 1960s. Fuller had long hair, a mustache, and liked to wear a denim jacket. When he ran for the city council in 1971 with a progressive agenda, he was considered the epitome of counterculture. Fuller was elected but later dismissed for his support for LGBTQ rights.

Times were changing and students were demanding a different style of learning and teaching than traditional university courses. Fuller helped found a “free school” in Boulder. Free schools were named after the freedom to teach and learn and were part of a national movement of alternative educational organizations.

First funded by the University of Colorado’s Associated Students, Boulders Community Free School became independent and relocated its headquarters to the hill. For a while, the school shared the same address as the Jabberwock bookstore.

The Community Free School offered courses on non-mainstream subjects including Occult Meditation, Macrobiotic Cooking, New Age Teachings, The Revolution Begins with You and later Massage, Women Liberation, Yoga, Organic Horticulture and Beekeeping. The CSF grew to be one of the most successful free schools in the country, despite the FBI keeping an eye on them in their early years.

Other organizations joined the hill in the growing movement for alternative education. Demand for hands-on experience and handcrafted goods led to the creation of the Pottery Lab on the 10th and Aurora. The town of Boulder began offering classes such as belly dancing, psychology, and bread-making at the Harbeck House in the early 1970s.

Entrepreneurs founded counterculture companies on the hill. The cotangent on 13th Street became the place to shop for vintage clothing and other popular styles. Across from Tulagi and upstairs, young people poured into the surplus army clothing store, bell-bottoms, velvet pants, Nehru shirts, and dashikis. A team of seamstresses created flowing silk dresses and capes and made bespoke clothing for successful rock musicians of the time. The store also sold rock concert tickets and sometimes the ticket line was several blocks long.

Down the street, Phantasmagoria, which smelled of incense and leather, also became a cool place to meet and talk. The workshop and shop sold leather sandals, ornate leather belts, watch straps, and leather vests along with rock concert tickets.

Boulder has retained some of the 1960s spirit more than many other places. Today, many Boulder residents bake their own whole grain bread, wear bohemian clothing, practice yoga, attend rock concerts, follow liberal policies, take alternative courses, and buy progressive books. Once considered radical activities, they can all trace their origins back to the counterculture on University Hill.

Carol Taylor can be reached at carolellentaylor@gmail.com. She and Silvia Pettem take turns in the history column “In Retrospect”.

The post Counterculture on the hill-shaped boulder - Colorado Hometown Weekly first appeared on DAILY COLORADO NEWS.

Category: Denver-Boulder
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Fort Collins, CO – Accident with injuries on Greenfields Ct near E Mulberry St. reported
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 07:30:20 GMT
Fort Collins, CO - Accident with injuries on Greenfields Ct near E Mulberry St.  reported

Fort Collins, CO (June 20, 2021) – Rescue workers were called in the Fort Collins area at the scene of the accident, which resulted in injuries. At around 8:21 p.m. on June 19, Fort Collins police, firefighters and emergency services from UCHealth University of Colorado Hospital responded to the scene of a traffic-related incident at Greenfields Court.

Local authorities reported that a collision between vehicles blocked Greenfields County at the intersection of East Mulberry Street in the evening hours. The incident prompted rescue workers to secure the area and stay on site for over an hour to clear the lane. EMS briefly cared for the injured on site before transporting the other people in need of care to local hospitals. The incident is currently under investigation.

Our thoughts go with the victims who were injured in this accident. We hope for her full recovery.

Car accidents in Colorado

Tens of thousands of people are involved in road accidents in the state of Colorado each year. Many incidents result in injuries for those involved. Although we think we are prepared for the consequences of a crash, no one can predict the psychological, financial, and physical effects of these collisions. In many cases, victims experience injuries that require both immediate and long-term care. These injuries result in overwhelming pain and suffering, forcing victims to recover from work for extended periods of time. Unfortunately, thousands of people can never recover from their injuries. Instead, they have to endure the consequences indefinitely.

If victims are harmed in accidents caused by negligent and reckless drivers, legal remedies may be available to help them recover. A team of responsive and reputable personal injury attorneys in Colorado can help you maximize your recovery so you are in the best possible position for the future. Our team is well versed in all of the games that selfish insurance companies are trying to avoid paying victims the compensation they rightly deserve, and we will not let them take advantage of our customers. We take care of troubled insurance companies to ensure that victims are well compensated for their injuries and harms that threaten them.

Simpson Castle, Colorado personal injury attorneys have decades of experience helping our clients protect their injury rights in the event of an accident across the state. Our team provides aggressive legal representation to ensure that injured parties are fully and fairly compensated by the culpable parties. We value our customers and fight diligently to make sure they are in the best possible position to move forward and get the justice they deserve. If you were injured in an accident as a result of someone else’s negligence, contact our Colorado personal injury law firm as soon as possible. We can arrange a free case review by calling (888) 895-2080 or 866-234-7768 to discuss the circumstances of your accident so we can determine the most appropriate steps to follow. Contact our law firm today so we can get started on your case.

Note: Independent sources have been used in the preparation of this article. These sources include news reports, police reports, eyewitness reports, social media reports, and firsthand reports of the accident with injuries. For this reason, the facts about the specific events surrounding this accident were not independently verified by our team of authors. If any information about a particular incident is incorrect or you would like the post removed, please contact us as soon as possible so we can correct it or remove the post.

Disclaimer: At Burg Simpson law firm, we are committed to giving back to our local community members. We have dedicated our careers to improving people’s lives by fighting for them in court to ensure that they receive fair and full compensation for their injuries and damage if they are injured. We hope these posts will help raise awareness of the dangers of driving and remind members of our communities to practice safer driving habits and take the necessary precautions to avoid injury. This is not a solicitation to companies. The information in this post should not be misunderstood as medical or legal advice. The photos shown in this post are not representative of the actual scene of the accident.

The post Fort Collins, CO - Accident with injuries on Greenfields Ct near E Mulberry St. reported first appeared on DAILY COLORADO NEWS.

Category: Fort Collins
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Weather in Colorado Springs: Strong, possibly severe, thunderstorms possible Sunday afternoon | Colorado Springs News
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 05:32:58 GMT
Weather in Colorado Springs: Strong, possibly severe, thunderstorms possible Sunday afternoon |  Colorado Springs News

In the counties of El Paso, Pueblo, Crowley and Otero, strong, possibly severe thunderstorms are possible on Sunday afternoons and evenings, according to the National Weather Service in Pueblo.

A cold front will hit the Interstate 25 corridor and the nearby plains and stall in the afternoon, with the potential for severe storms with hail up to 1.5 inches in diameter, gusts of wind up to 60 mph, and possible tornadoes reports the weather service.

Additional thunderstorms are possible overnight over the southeastern plains, bringing with them hail up to 1 inch in diameter and gusts of wind up to 60 miles per hour.

Here is the weather forecast for the next few days according to the weather service:

Sunday: 30% chance of rain and thunderstorms, especially in the afternoon. Otherwise mostly sunny, with highs near 91 and winds of 10-15 mph.

Monday: 40% shower probability, thunderstorms also possible after 9 a.m. Otherwise partly sunny, with a high near 70. Winds of 5-15 mph.

Tuesday: Sunny, with a height of just over 90. Winds 5-10 miles an hour.

Wednesday: Mostly sunny, with highs of just under 95 and winds of 5-10 mph. 10% chance of showers and thunderstorms after noon.

Thursday: Mostly sunny, with highs near 90 and winds of 5-10 mph. A 20% chance of showers and thunderstorms after noon.

Friday: Mostly sunny, with highs close to 85 and winds of 5-10 mph. There is a possibility of showers and thunderstorms.

The post Weather in Colorado Springs: Strong, possibly severe, thunderstorms possible Sunday afternoon | Colorado Springs News first appeared on GLENDALE CHERRY CREEK CHRONICLE.

Category: News
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“Knowledge of the past exists to serve the needs of the living”
Sat, 19 Jun 2021 07:19:03 GMT

Editor’s Note: The American Association of University Professors, the American Historical Association, the Association of American Colleges & Universities, and PEN America have issued a joint statement expressing their “firm opposition” to legislation in at least 20 states that encourages the discussion of “divisive concepts” in public educational institutions.

We, the undersigned associations and organizations, oppose a deluge of legislative proposals across the country aimed at academic teaching, presentations, and discussions on racism and related issues of American history in schools, colleges, and universities. These efforts have taken different forms in at least 20 states; but often legislation aims to prohibit or impede the teaching and training of students on so-called “divisive concepts”. These divisive concepts, as defined in numerous draft laws, are a litany of vague and indefinite catchphrases and phrases, including, for example, “that every person should or should feel discomfort, guilt, fear, or any other form of psychological or emotional distress” the race or sex of that person. ”These legislative efforts are deeply troubling for a number of reasons.

“The ideal of an informed citizenship requires an educated public”

First, there is a risk that these bills will violate the teacher’s right to teach and the student’s right to learn. The clear aim of these efforts is to suppress teaching and learning about the role of racism in United States history. Allegedly, any investigation of racism in the classrooms in this country could cause some students to be “uncomfortable” as it is an inconvenient and complicated subject. But the ideal of informed citizenship requires an educated public. Educators need to provide an accurate look at the past to better prepare students for community participation and robust civic engagement. Suppressing or watering down discussions about “divisive concepts” in educational institutions deprives students of the opportunity to discuss and promote solutions to social division and injustice. Legislation cannot erase “concepts” or history; however, it can interfere with educators’ ability to help students deal with facts in an honest and open environment that can encourage intellectual exploration. Educators owe the students a clear, nuanced and open communication of the story so that they can learn, grow and face the issues of the day instead of orienting themselves towards a state-regulated ideology.

“An inadequate attempt to transfer responsibility for evaluating a curriculum … from educators to elected officials”

Second, these legislative efforts seek to replace the deliberate judgment of professional educators with political mandates, which hinder students’ ability to learn and think critically across differences and disagreements. These regulations represent an inadequate attempt to shift responsibility for evaluating a curriculum and curriculum from educators to elected officials. The purpose of education is to serve the common good by promoting open research and promoting human knowledge. Politicians in a democratic society should not manipulate public school curricula to pursue partisan or ideological goals. In higher education, according to widely held principles of academic freedom, professors are entitled to freedom in class when discussing their subject. Educators, not politicians, should make decisions about teaching and learning.

“A whitewashed view of history cannot change anything”

Knowledge of the past exists to serve the needs of the living. In the current context, this includes honest accounting with all aspects of this past. Americans of all ages deserve nothing less than a free and open exchange about the history and forces that shape our world today, an exchange that should take place in both the classroom and public space in general. Banning the tools that enable these discussions is depriving us of all the tools necessary for citizenship in the 21st century. A whitewashed view of history cannot change what happened in the past. A free and open society depends on the unrestricted pursuit and dissemination of knowledge.

American Association of University Professors

American History Society

Association of American Colleges & Universities

PEN America

The following organizations have signed this declaration:

Society for Agricultural History

Alcohol and Drug History Society

American Teachers Association, AFL-CIO

American folk society

American Library Association

American Society for Environmental History

League Against Defamation

Association for Ancient Historians

Society for Asia-America Studies

Association for documentary film editors

Association for Spanish and Portuguese History

Association for University Studies

Conference on Economic History

Chinese historians in the United States

Coalition of Urban and Urban Universities (CUMU)

Committee on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender History

Conference on Asian History

Conference on Faith and History

Foundation for Reading Freedom

Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities

Ethnic History Society of Immigration

Association for workers and workers history

Association for Middle East Studies

National Association for Women’s Studies

Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media

Shakespeare Association of America

Society for the Study of Early Modern Women and the Sexes G

Society of Civil War Historians

Southern Historical Society

Association for city history

Western History Association

The post "Knowledge of the past exists to serve the needs of the living" first appeared on LABOR NEWS WIRE.

Category: AFL-CIO
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New Jersey has fully vaccinated 4.7 million people, says Governor Murphy
Sun, 20 Jun 2021 20:18:42 GMT

New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy (D) speaks at the coronavirus press conference in Trenton, New Jersey.

Michael Brochstein | Barcroft Media | Getty Images

New Jersey has achieved its goal of fully vaccinating more than 4.7 million people living, working and studying in the state about two weeks before its original target date, June 30, Governor Phil Murphy said Friday.

The milestone comes after an aggressive vaccination campaign that included door knocking and incentives for the state’s residents like free beer and wine, free tickets to state parks, and even a dinner with Murphy and his wife.

The state also exceeded President Joe Biden’s goal of vaccinating 70% of adults with at least one dose by July 4th. According to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, New Jersey vaccinated about 77% of its adults with at least one dose.

“With the millions of you who have stepped forward today to protect yourself, your families and our communities, we are proud to announce that we have exceeded our original goal now and 12 days before our self-appointed deadline “said Murphy Friday at a press conference.

The New Jersey outbreak, which peaked in January with a seven-day average of more than 6,000 new cases per day, has since declined to a daily average of around 260 cases per day over the past week. New Jersey has seen more than 1 million Covid cases and 26,000 Covid deaths since data collection began.

Covid deaths in the state peaked in April 2020 with a seven-day average of 345 deaths per day. The number has since fallen to an average of 6 deaths per day.

The state previously defied the CDC’s recommendations to allow vaccinated people to wear a mask indoors, but passed the CDC guidelines two weeks later.

The post New Jersey has fully vaccinated 4.7 million people, says Governor Murphy first appeared on DAILYZ HEALTH NEWS.

Category: Publish Health
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The great mask conundrum – Wisconsin Examiner
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 03:20:37 GMT
masked shopper

A masked shopper examines products in a retail store. (Photo by Atoms via Unsplash)

Recently Washington Post columnist Tamar Haspel tweeted: “My local supermarket has (a) sign saying they ‘strongly encourage’ everyone to wear a mask. Do you wear one, and feel silly engaging in hygiene theater? Or not wear one and feel a little like an (a–hole)?”

It’s a great question, and on a lot of people’s minds, as evidenced by the comments that followed.

Concord Monitor columnist and reporter Dave Brooks, known on Twitter as @GraniteGeek, replied: “I wear mine although I’m fully vaxxed but I do feel a little silly. I tell myself it gives psychological support to people who need to stay masked (immunosuppressed, etc), and is a reminder that the pandemic hasn’t magically disappeared.”

Haspel replied: “I have similar feelings. But the vast majority of people who are unvaxxed choose to be unvaxxed. And the thing I’d really like to normalize is vaccination. So there’s no place I’m comfortable here.”

A thoughtful conversation — something of a rarity on Twitter — ensued, with some pointing to the importance of normalizing and encouraging mask wearing, including during cold and flu season, and others settling on something more fundamental: common courtesy. All good points, but for me “The Answer” remains elusive.

A couple of weeks ago, the grocery store I frequent swapped out its “Masks required” sign for one saying there were now separate rules for the vaccinated and the unvaccinated. Get the shot, ditch the mask. Skip the shot, cover up.

The first time I saw the new poster, I stared at it dumbly for a few seconds, took a couple of steps into the store, identified maskless employee after maskless employee, and then removed the cloth mask from my face and put it in my back pocket. My steps felt lighter during that excursion, and I found myself doing something I rarely do while food shopping: smiling.

When I returned to the store a few days later, the mask stayed with the loose change and crumpled receipts in my truck’s console. This time, however, it wasn’t the maskless faces that struck me but the number of people still wearing them. My naked face clearly landed me in the minority — and I knew that a lot of those masks were being worn by people who, like me, were fully vaccinated. Inner conflict took root. 

What message did I want to send: “Hey, I’m not wearing a mask and that means it’s been at least two weeks since my second shot. Yay, science!” or “I’m still wearing a mask because I don’t think you can be too sensitive when it comes to the physical and emotional well-being of others.” Both are fine things to signal to the world, but what if my fellow shoppers misread my decision entirely and thought I was wearing a mask because I’m skeptical of the vaccine or not wearing one only because I think COVID is overblown?

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I’ve returned to the store several times since then, always maskless, and the struggle continues. When I walk down an aisle with others not wearing masks, I feel like we are leading the charge to normalcy and should be high-fiving. When I pass, say, a masked older couple, I feel nothing but guilt. I want to apologize and explain that the last thing I want to do is make them feel uncomfortable, that I really do care about them, and if they would rather that I still wear a mask I would be happy to run back to the parking lot and grab one. 

But then I’d pass another older couple, both with easy smiles on uncovered faces, and righteousness would return.

Grocery shopping is now something very much like my childhood as a Catholic: rapid transitions between joy and guilt.

I am no closer to definitively answering Haspel’s Twitter question today than last week, but I will make one small change in my behavior: I plan to keep a mask in my pocket when I shop. That way I can read the room, as they say, and remain flexible. 

Going maskless, or wearing one, doesn’t have to be my religion. For now, in these odd days, that answer will have to do.

New Hampshire Bulletin is part of States Newsroom, a network of news bureaus supported by grants and a coalition of donors as a 501c(3) public charity. New Hampshire Bulletin maintains editorial independence. Contact Editor Dana Wormald for questions: [email protected]



originally published at https%3A%2F%2Fwisconsinexaminer.com%2F2021%2F06%2F17%2Fthe-great-mask-conundrum%2F by Dana Wormald

The post The great mask conundrum - Wisconsin Examiner first appeared on Daily Badger Bulletin.

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St. Petersburg coronavirus patients filmed while lying in the hospital corridor
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 08:34:10 GMT
St. Petersburg coronavirus patients filmed while lying in the hospital corridor

A Video Sunday is said to have been filmed in a coronavirus hospital in Saint Petersburg, showing patients lining the hallway in beds and on mattresses on the floor.

Footage from the # 15 City Hospital shared on social media paints a dire picture of the third wave of the pandemic as authorities reintroduce anti-coronavirus restrictions and seek to revive a stalled vaccination campaign.

A patient’s brother who filmed and uploaded the video said medics suggested his brother “lie on his stomach and take a deep breath” until a doctor arrives Monday, according to St. Petersburg news website mr- 7.ru.

Health authorities in Russia’s second largest city said Since the recent increase, at least 800 new patients are entering the hospitals every day. City Health Committee said As of Friday, 90% of the city’s 9,000 hospital beds in 15 facilities for Covid-19 patients were occupied.

Russia’s third wave is powered by the highly contagious Delta variant, which was first identified in India. It threatens to overwhelm hospitals as officials rush to reintroduce a number of pandemic restrictions and provide new beds for Covid-19 patients.

In Moscow, the epicenter of the Russian outbreak with more than half of the country’s new infections and two consecutive days of record high cases on Friday and Saturday, the delta variant accounts for nearly 90% of new infections. Authorities in the city of 12 million people announced that they plan to expand hospital beds from 17,000 to 24,000 over the next two weeks.

Moscow records pandemic high for Covid cases for the second day in a row

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St. Petersburg, which hosts several Euro 2020 football matches, including a quarter-finals on July 2nd, limited attendance in two fan zones from Sunday after food sales were banned there last week. The city confirmed more than 1,000 new infections on Sunday for the first time since February.

Health authorities said they considered making vaccinations mandatory in case hospital stays overwhelm the city’s health system. Ten other Russian regions, including Moscow, have mandated vaccinations for certain categories of workers.

Russia has the sixth highest total coronavirus case number in the world with 5.3 million officially confirmed infections.

The post St. Petersburg coronavirus patients filmed while lying in the hospital corridor first appeared on Daily Florida Press.

Category: Tampa St. Pete
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1.2T bipartisan infrastructure plan is ‘troublesome’: Rep. Miller-Meeks
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 09:47:00 GMT




Rep. Mariannette Miller-Meeks, R-Iowa, joins ‘Fox News Live’ to provide insight into the bipartisan infrastructure plan. #FoxNews

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Title: 1.2T bipartisan infrastructure plan is ‘troublesome’: Rep. Miller-Meeks
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Horrific story of the week:

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Decline in CV tests at the start of the pandemic varies by region
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 06:06:26 GMT

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At the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, diagnostic CV volumes declined, but the declines varied by US region, according to data from the INCAPS-COVID registry.

“The global reduction in diagnostic cardiovascular testing has raised concerns about the impact of reduced testing on morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease.” Cole B. Hirschfeld, MD, Resident Internal Medicine at Irving Medical Center, Columbia University and New York-Presbyterian Hospital, and colleagues wrote in JACC: Cardiovascular Imaging. “We compared laboratory characteristics, practices, and volume of procedures between US and non-US facilities, and between US geographic regions, and identified factors associated with volume reductions in the United States.”

The data were provided by Hirschfeld CB, et al. JACC cardiovascular imaging. 2021; doi: 10.1016 / j.jcmg.2021.03.007.

Decrease in diagnostic tests

The researchers analyzed 1.3 million imaging studies from the INCAPS-COVID registry from 909 centers in 108 countries, including 155 centers in 40 US states. They compared data from April 2020, at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, with data from March 2019.

Diagnostic CV procedures declined globally in April 2020, with similar rates inside and outside the US (US, 68%; non-US, 63%; P = 0.237), the researchers said.

However, they found that invasive coronary angiography procedures decreased more in the US compared to other countries (69% vs. 53%; P

Category: Infectious Disease
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Suds To Flow Again As Michigan Beer Festivals Return
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 03:01:12 GMT
Suds To Flow Again As Michigan Beer Festivals Return

The Michigan Brewers Guild is proud to announce three upcoming beer festival dates after a break of more than a year. Tickets for all three events will go on sale to the general public on Thursday, June 24th at 10am, with advance sales for Enthusiast members starting on Tuesday, June 22nd at 10am on MiBeer.com.

Michigan August Beer Festival – South takes place on Saturday, August 14th at the LMCU Ballpark, home of the West Michigan Whitecaps in Comstock Park (north of Grand Rapids). General admission is from 1:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m., with the gates opening at 12:00 p.m. for a VIP hour for enthusiastic members. Tickets are $ 50 per person in advance ($ 55 a day) with Designated Driver tickets for $ 10 Michigan August Beer Festival – North takes place on Saturday, August 28th at Turtle Creek Stadium in Traverse City, home of the Traverse City Pit Spitters. General admission is from 1:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m., with the gates opening at 12:00 p.m. for a VIP hour for enthusiastic members. Tickets are priced at $ 50 per person in advance ($ 55 a day), with Designated Driver tickets priced at $ 10. UP autumn beer festival takes place on Saturday September 11th at Mattson Lower Harbor Park in Marquette. General admission is from 1:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m., with the gates opening at 12:00 p.m. for a VIP hour for enthusiastic members. Tickets are priced at $ 50 per person in advance ($ 55 a day), with Designated Driver tickets priced at $ 10.

“We are happy and excited about the opportunity to return to Michigan Brewers Guild Beer Festivals and look forward to seeing people in person,” said Scott Graham, Executive Director of the Guild. “We are currently working with our partners at West Michigan Whitecaps and Traverse City Pit Spitters on logistics and security logs, which gives us the added benefit of their infrastructure and experience of their own events.”

A reminder that July is again “Michigan Beer Month”. As part of this year’s celebrations, a one-of-a-kind commemorative pint glass will be available at many member breweries, and those breweries are also encouraged to showcase a special beer – like a collaboration or special publication – throughout the month to help celebrate. Details on these campaigns and the participating breweries will be published shortly on MiBeer.com and the guild’s social media channels (see links below).

The Michigan Brewers Guild was founded in 1997 and represents nearly 300 member breweries. The Guild is a passionate beer community that believes in high quality craftsmanship, bold character, fun, responsibility and pushing the boundaries. The guild’s mission is to promote and protect the Michigan’s beer industry with an overall goal of helping locally brewed beer reach 20% of all beer sales in the state by 2025.

Michigan’s brewing industry contributes more than 21,000 full-time employees and $ 914 million in labor income, with a macroeconomic impact of over $ 2.5 billion. In terms of total breweries, microbreweries, and brewpubs, Michigan ranks 6th in the nation – which supports its title as “The Great Beer State”.

The post Suds To Flow Again As Michigan Beer Festivals Return first appeared on Wolverine State Watch.

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The air conditioning paradox: How staying cool makes it hotter
Wed, 16 Jun 2021 16:29:38 GMT


(Dean Moriarty via Pixabay)

Ain’t nobody got the words like a Southerner when it comes to heat waves — and this week, there’s gonna be a whole lotta hens layin’ hard boiled eggs.

But before you reach for the thermostat, think twice. Every degree you turn it down, you’re turning up the dial on climate change.

The air conditioning paradox is cruel. No one thinks about 10 years out while sweatin’ like a hog. Yet thinking ahead is exactly what addressing climate change requires us to do.

The problem with AC is two-fold.

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The first issue is hydrofluorocarbons. Hydrofluorocarbons are chemical compounds used as refrigerants in cooling systems including air conditioning. Like carbon dioxide, HFCs are greenhouse gases, meaning they trap heat when in the atmosphere and contribute to climate change. Although these compounds make up significantly less of the greenhouse gasses than CO2, HFCs are many thousand times more potent at trapping heat, meaning they accelerate climate much more quickly, even in small amounts.

When contained properly in cooling systems, HFCs can be used for cooling without too much guilt. However, if there is a leak, or if a unit is disposed of improperly, these compounds can quickly escape into the atmosphere and wreak havoc. With millions of AC units in use, these effects add up more than one might suspect.

Based on current levels of HFC use in the United States, the Environmental Protection Agency estimates total HFC emissions could equate to more than 4.7 billion metric tons of CO2 by 2050. This is roughly the equivalent of three full years of U.S. power sector emissions based on 2019 levels. Thankfully, as of May 3, the EPA has moved to reverse a Trump-era policy, and is now working under President Joe Biden’s administration to reduce HFCs by 85% over the next 15 years. Still, if you have a model with a leak using HFCs, you’ll want to get it fixed or replaced immediately.

The second concern with AC use is energy consumption, and this is the crux of the paradox.

As climate change continues to drive temperatures hotter than the hinges of Hades’ gates, the energy required to use air conditioners — even units without HFCs — increases dramatically. Given our current grid infrastructure is nowhere close to fully renewable, this means we’re using more fossil fuels every time we reach for the “on” switch. Of course, the increased use of fossil fuels further drives climate change, making temperatures even hotter, which in turn requires more air conditioning, thereby using more energy. This loop continues ad nauseum, until eventually it’s so hot they’d say cows give evaporated milk. Not even a sweet iced tea can fix that one.

Energy consumption is also problematic in that as we transition to a fully renewable grid, it requires not only producing enough energy to meet current demands, but actually expanding energy capacities for the anticipated increased demands as energy consumption continues to rise for extreme temperatures. Especially as many existing buildings do not have built-in air conditioning systems, more units will be installed, further increasing consumption. Given we all use the energy at the same time — when it’s hot — the rate at which we consume energy could easily extend well beyond our current grid capacities. One need look no further than the Texas electrical grid this week for an example.

If you’re thinking the AC paradox will disproportionately impact disadvantaged communities, you’re right, and for multiple reasons. For starters, in many states, landlords are not required to provide air conditioning — even in climates hotter than the dickens. This risks the health of tenants who can’t afford to buy. At the same time, the cost of increased cooling is also an issue, and those who can’t afford to better insulate or upgrade cooling systems will be most impacted.

All this isn’t to say you shouldn’t turn on your AC — you almost certainly must. Still, we should all be aware of how often we use it, when we use it and especially how to properly fix leaks or dispose of units as needed so as to avoid further exacerbating the problem.

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Ousted Area Force commander defended by Rep. Lamborn advanced white ‘genocide’ theory in book
Wed, 16 Jun 2021 11:33:54 GMT

Lt. Col. Matthew Lohmeier was commander of the 11th Space Warning Squadron at Buckley Space Force Base in Aurora until last month, when he was relieved of command following public criticism of what he called the growing influence of “cultural Marxism” in the U.S. military. Now, his case is being reviewed by the Air Force inspector general, while Republican politicians, including Rep. Doug Lamborn of Colorado Springs, have rallied to his defense.

“He is an outstanding young man,” Lamborn, who said he’d met with Lohmeier last week, told conservative radio host Tony Perkins in a Thursday interview. “I think he’s the kind of person we want to keep in the military, and not drive out of the military.”

As first reported by Military.com, Lohmeier was removed from his post on May 14 “due to loss of trust and confidence in his ability to lead,” a Space Force spokesperson said, according to CNN.

“This decision was based on public comments made by Lt. Col. Lohmeier in a recent podcast,” the spokesperson said. Lohmeier appeared on a May 7 episode of the right-wing “Information Operation” podcast to promote his self-published book, “Irresistible Revolution: Marxism’s Goal of Conquest and the Unmaking of the American Military.”

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In his book, Lohmeier praises the Trump administration’s efforts to crack down on diversity training programs within the Department of Defense, and he denounces what he calls the department’s “current radical narrative about systemic racism in America.” Much of the book consists of unsubstantiated and anonymous anecdotes that Lohmeier says illustrate the “increasingly overt support for the progressive, Marxist worldview” within the armed forces. He criticizes efforts by the Biden administration to root out right-wing extremism in the military’s ranks and falsely claims that the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol was carried out “by a mixed group of Trump supporters and Antifa agent provocateurs.”

Lohmeier also embraces theories that are widely identified by anti-extremism researchers and advocacy groups as being characteristic of white-supremacist ideology. In the book’s final chapter, titled “The Wrath to Come,” Lohmeier warns of what he says are the inevitable consequences of “the rhetorical demonization of conservatives and whites in the country.”

“I had always intended the final chapter of this book to be a warning — a warning that ideas have consequences,” Lohmeier wrote. “A warning that postmodernist, neo-Marxist ideology employs vile rhetoric that stokes rage and leads people to do terrible things. This chapter is about fratricidal and genocidal warfare, and all of the horror that implies — because you cannot persist in the hate-filled demonization of entire groups of people based on their race or political affiliation without incurring the wrath of genocide. To persist means that it is not a question of whether it will turn into violence — that it will, follows like the night the day. Rather, the only question remaining is when.”

“To be perfectly clear, the path we are on as a country leads to fratricidal and genocidal warfare,” Lohmeier continues. “In disheartening irony, the politically correct, overly sensitive, racially charged, woke culture in which we live prevents peaceful citizens from properly publicly identifying real threats for what they are.”

The words “genocide” or “genocidal” are used in relation to these issues 17 times throughout Lohmeier’s book, which was published on May 10 and is currently ranked as the No. 1 bestseller in the “Military Policy” category on Amazon’s website.

The “white genocide conspiracy theory,” according to Georgetown University’s Bridge Initiative, “is the belief that immigration by people of color, falling white birth rates, and the promotion of multiculturalism are all part of a deliberate plot to destroy the ‘white race.’” The Anti-Defamation League says the concept was “coined by white supremacists for propaganda purposes as shorthand for one of the most deeply held modern white supremacist convictions: that the white race is ‘dying’ due to growing non-white populations and ‘forced assimilation.’”

Hosted by Air Force veteran and author L. Todd Wood, the “Information Operation” podcast on which Lohmeier appeared last month is produced by Creative Destruction Media, a far-right website that has pushed the QAnon conspiracy theory and continues to publish a wide range of debunked claims and misinformation alleging that the 2020 election was stolen, that the COVID-19 pandemic was “planned” by “globalists,” and more.

Lohmeier did not respond to a request for comment submitted through his personal website.

GOP uproar over ‘critical race theory’

Lohmeier’s criticism of the U.S. military and his removal from command come amid a growing national uproar from conservatives over “critical race theory,” a once-obscure academic term that experts say is now being widely misapplied to describe everything from diversity training and teaching the history of slavery to analyses of systemic racism and protests against police violence.

Since the beginning of 2021, Republican lawmakers in at least 21 states, many of them invoking the specter of critical race theory, have launched efforts to “restrict education on racism, bias, the contributions of specific racial or ethnic groups to U.S. history, or related topics,” according to Chalkbeat.

Days after Lohmeier’s removal, a group of 24 Republican members of Congress, including Lamborn and fellow Colorado Rep. Lauren Boebert, sent a letter to Air Force and Space Force officials praising his “level-headed critique” of current military policies, and calling for his immediate reinstatement. Lamborn at the time issued a statement that closely matched many of the attacks on critical race theory made in Lohmeier’s book.


Rep. Doug Lamborn shakes hands with President Donald Trump on stage during a Keep America Great rally on Feb. 20, 2020, in Colorado Springs. Vice President Mike Pence and Sen. Cory Gardner, a first-term Republican up for reelection this year, joined Trump at the rally. (Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images)

“I am growing increasingly concerned about the proliferation of training and discussions rooted in critical race theory throughout the Department of Defense,” Lamborn said. “This Marxist ideology teaches racial prejudice and collective guilt. The fact that it would be taught and promoted in the U.S. military is deeply disturbing.”

A spokesperson for Lamborn did not respond to multiple requests for comment on whether the congressman had read Lohmeier’s book, or whether he agreed with Lohmeier’s remarks on white “genocide.”

Lohmeier isn’t the only opponent of critical race theory to have recently veered into espousal of white genocide theory. James Lindsay, a well-known right-wing academic whose work Lohmeier cites in his book, faced criticism from many of his fellow conservatives last week after writing on Twitter that “there will be” a genocide of whites “if this ideology isn’t stopped.” Earlier this month, Lindsay was a featured panelist at the annual retreat of the Leadership Program of the Rockies, a conservative networking organization, at The Broadmoor resort in Colorado Springs.

“James Lindsay is now peddling White Genocide Theory,” Claire Lehmann, founder of the right-leaning website Quillette, wrote on Twitter on June 9. “Implying that a genocide against whites in the U.S. is imminent has the potential to inspire racist violence. Such comments are extreme, reckless, and irresponsible. They should be denounced.”

Lohmeier served in the Air Force for 14 years prior to his October 2020 transfer to the Space Force, which was established under the Department of the Air Force in 2019. The 11th Space Warning Squadron, which Lohmeier commanded, is a 69-member unit tasked with overseeing satellite-based missile warning systems.

Following the outcry from GOP members of Congress over Lohmeier’s removal, the Air Force inspector general said that it would conduct the investigation into his actions “due to the complexity and sensitivity of the issues under consideration, as well as potential for (Department of the Air Force)-wide impact,” a spokesperson told Military.com.

Lamborn continued to insist in an interview on Thursday that Lohmeier was “relieved of his command for speaking out against critical race theory.”

“If we let critical race theory, the 1619 Project, some of these other poisonous and destructive teachings take hold in our military … who’s going to want to defend it?” Lamborn said. “Who’s going to want to give years and years of their life, or possibly even make the ultimate sacrifice if called upon, for a country that is so flawed? That’s what really concerns me about critical race theory and these other treacherous teachings.”

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The post Ousted Space Force commander defended by Rep. Lamborn advanced white ‘genocide’ theory in book appeared first on Colorado Newsline.

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Looking Ahead- MotoAmerica Superbike at Virginia International Raceway
Wed, 19 May 2021 21:19:12 GMT

If absence does indeed make the heart grow fonder, then the men of the 2021 MotoAmerica HONOS Superbike Series are longing more than ever to get back to one of their favorite venues on the calendar – VIRginia International Raceway – after the event was cancelled last year due to COVID-19.

The MotoAmerica Superbike Championship points leader going into this weekend’s race at VIRginia International Raceway is none other than Westby Racing’s Mathew Scholtz. Photo by Brian J. Nelson

If you ask 20 of the top motorcycle road racers in the country to list their favorite racetracks, VIR would rank in the top two or three for the majority of them. With its vast array of corners, elevation changes and high speed, VIR is always one of the most eagerly anticipated rounds of the season. Especially so with the stars of the series not getting the opportunity to race through the Virginia forest in 2020.

“VIR is the next round and it’s one of my strongest tracks, so I’m looking forward to it.” – Mathew Scholtz

“I’m looking forward to VIR. I really, really love that place and this bike will be rockin’ around there.” – Jake Gagne

With the opening round of the 2021 MotoAmerica Superbike Series in the books, round two is on the horizon this week at VIRginia International Raceway and for a few riders in the HONOS Superbike class it takes on the utmost of importance.

While all or nothing may be a bit extreme, getting a good result at VIR is… well, for Loris Baz anyway, all or nothing. Of all the championship hopefuls, Baz’s opening round was the one most in need of a re-do as he left Michelin Raceway Road Atlanta with a big ol’ goose egg in the championship points tally after a crash and a mechanical took him out of both races.

But let’s remember that it’s always better to trail the championship points leader by 45 points after the first round than with just one remaining. And that’s where Baz and his Warhorse HSBK Racing Ducati New York team finds themselves: 45 points behind championship leader Mathew Scholtz. Time, however, is on Baz’s side and, put it this way, if he rips off nine race wins in a row with Scholtz finishing second in those nine races, the two would be tied. With 18 races and 450 points up for grabs, this thing is far from over.

While Baz’s opener was somewhat flawed, Scholtz’s was near perfect. The Westby Racing rider won the first race and finished second in the second, and that vaulted him to the top of the standings and feeling fine as the series moves to VIR after a one-year hiatus from the popular venue. Scholtz shows up at VIR with 45 out of a possible 50 points in his pocket.

Although it’s not a weekend he’s going to brag about, the two races at Michelin Raceway Road Atlanta might be ones that Josh Herrin looks back on fondly at season’s end. Herrin rode his Fresh N’ Lean Attack Performance Yamaha YZF-R1 to a pair of thirds in the opening round and that places him second in the championship heading into VIR. Although he was third both times out, Herrin wasn’t pleased about the distance between him and the race winner – 12.8 seconds in race one, 15 seconds in race two – as he struggles to get comfortable on the new Yamaha. Still, he left with a boatload of points and that’s better than most.

M4 ECSTAR Suzuki’s Bobby Fong had a good opening weekend, albeit marred by a race-two jump start that forced him to take a pit-lane ride-through penalty. From there he fought through to finish fifth, a day after finishing second to Scholtz in race one. It was a good piece of damage control and he rolls into VIR third in the points – 14 points adrift of Scholtz.

Speaking of damage control… Jake Gagne qualified on pole position and was the man to beat all weekend. Well, right up to the point where he suffered a blown engine just one lap into the first race of the season. Unlike Baz, however, Gagne was able to rebound and rebound in a big way with a dominating victory in race two on the Fresh N’ Lean Attack Performance Yamaha. He sits fifth in the title chase – 20 points behind Scholtz.

Kyle Wyman’s opening weekend was quietly effective. The team owner/racer ripped the covers off his Ducati Panigale V4 R to show his off new sponsor Panera Breads during the week and then went out and finished fifth and sixth in the two races. It was also a weekend where Wyman did double duty as he made his King Of The Baggers debut at Michelin Raceway Road Atlanta. He will be less busy at VIR and will focus his efforts solely on his HONOS Superbike program.

Quiet best describes Hector Barbera’s MotoAmerica debut with the Spaniard finishing sixth and seventh in the two races in Georgia on his Scheibe Racing BMW. New bike, new track, new tires, unfamiliar series… not a bad effort considering the challenges he faced.

Travis Wyman ended up at the top of the Superbike Cup, which runs within the Superbike class for riders mounted on Stock 1000-spec motorcycles, at Michelin Raceway Road Atlanta, the Travis Wyman BMW rider carding seventh- and-eighth place finishes over the course of the weekend. That bested Altus Motorsports’ Jake Lewis in his return to MotoAmerica action. Lewis and Geoff May came away from the Michelin Raceway Road Atlanta weekend ranked ninth and 10th in the HONOS Superbike title chase.

VIR Superbike Notes

The first-ever AMA Superbike race at VIRginia International Raceway in 2001 was won by the late Nicky Hayden, the 2002 AMA Superbike Champion and 2006 MotoGP World Champion backing that up with a second victory at VIR in 2002.

Five-time MotoAmerica Superbike Champion Cameron Beaubier, who now competes in the Moto2 World Championship, is the HONOS Superbike lap record holder at VIRginia International Raceway. Beaubier’s best lap is a 1:23.790 set during Superpole in 2018.

With no race at VIR in 2020, we have to bounce back to 2019 to see that JD Beach won his first AMA Superbike race in the second of two races – just a week after the popular racer won bis first career AMA Grand National Flat Track in Arizona. Beach topped his former Supersport Series rival Garrett Gerloff in taking his first career win. The day prior, Cameron Beaubier topped his rival Toni Elias to score the MotoAmerica Superbike win.

Mathew Scholtz scored the third AMA Superbike win of his career on Saturday at Michelin Raceway Road Atlanta a few weeks ago and that put him into a nine-way tie for 30th on the all-time AMA Superbike win list. Scholtz is tied with some pretty impressive names: Martin Cardenas, Ben Bostrom, Pascal Picotte, Colin Edwards, Troy Corser, Bobby Fong, Steve McLaughlin and Reg Pridmore.

With his victory in race two a few weeks ago at Michelin Raceway Road Atlanta, Jake Gagne became the 61st rider to win an AMA Superbike race.

Scholtz’s and Gagne’s victories at Michelin Raceway Road Atlanta were the 146th and 147th career wins for Yamaha as a manufacturer in AMA Superbike racing. Suzuki leads the way with 215 Superbike wins.

The Stock 1000 class again leads the way in entries with 36 riders scheduled to take to the track at VIR. There are 28 HONOS Superbike entries, 26 Supersport entries, 18 SportbikeTrackGear.com Junior Cup entries and 28 Twins Cup entries.

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Clippers Forced To Take Pop Quizzes In Phoenix, And Questions Got Too Hard – Daily Bulletin
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 00:11:25 GMT
Clippers Forced To Take Pop Quizzes In Phoenix, And Questions Got Too Hard - Daily Bulletin

Algebra 2 is harder than Algebra 1. The levels at the top are more challenging than the bottom.

Phoenix adds another level of difficulty for the Clippers, even if they play without poor rehearsals, even if TV planners perform them at lunch. That’s how it’s built, of course.

On Sunday, the Suns scored 120 points without Chris Paul, the 36-year-old Boy Scout champion who was credited with grabbing this dusty franchise by his lapel and basically making it number 2 in the Western Conference. Either he did a great job with the joystick, at home with Jake and Cliff and Sabrina, or this is a much better and more resourceful team than we were told.

Even so, the Clippers took their punches and kept going until Terance Mann’s 3-pointer reduced the lead to two with 22 seconds remaining. Devin Booker then used a defensive glitch on an inbound game to hit another shot, and Phoenix took a 1-0 lead in the Western Conference finals by 120-114.

“We did well,” said Tyronn Lue, the Clippers coach. “We’ll be better.”

It was reminiscent of the first two defeats in the second round series against Utah, in which the top seeded Jazz controlled most of the game and the Clippers slipped again at the end of the bell.

The clippers brushed the fatigue factor aside, probably because the question was superfluous. Of course, it did matter, as evidenced by their 34.8 percent shootouts in the fourth quarter and willingness to take the first available questionable shot instead of going on defense like they did on Friday night’s comeback to the jazz to end.

Still, they took 34 points off their bench, with DeMarcus Cousins ​​staggering 11 points over the years in a second quarter. It was more of a defensive issue as Booker pounded out of 18-foot range in the second half and ended up with 40 points, 13 rebounds and 11 assists.

Cameron Payne, usually Paul’s replacement, also had nine assists and gave the Suns a jagged edge. That’s 31 assists for the Suns compared to seven turnovers. Who would have thought that Kawhi Leonard would be harder to replace in the short term than Paul?

Leonard is out with a sprained knee and no one should expect to see him on Tuesday. The Clippers could have used his defense on Sunday. They led 84-78 when Booker started his mid-range mischief, scoring the next 10 Phoenix points and really didn’t let up until Cam Johnson’s offensive rebound (which the Clippers thought was a basket failure) made a 105-95 lead.

The Clippers have seen high pick and rolls for several seasons. This is different because of the 6-foot-11 DeAndre Ayton of the Suns, the picker-and-roller. “He’s more agile, a better finisher than the greats we’ve met,” said Paul George.

When the Clippers use Ivica Zubac in these situations, they have trouble fighting the pick and roll, and if not, Ayton is much more willing than Rudy Gobert to throw the thunder on the little ones who pretend to be defending him .

While Dallas’s Luka Doncic is still the best player the Clippers have come across this postseason, he hasn’t had enough help. While Utah’s Donovan Mitchell is the most explosive long-distance scorer the Clippers or anyone else will face, Booker is more versatile and sophisticated.

And the Suns are a much better overtaking team than Dallas or Utah, especially within the track. Add the lanky presence of Mikal Bridges and Jae Crowder to disrupt George (34 points on 10v26 shooting) and the Clippers definitely know they’ve been sent to the next level.

“We gave them some comfort,” said Reggie Jackson. “We have to smother them, next game. There is a lot of film watching ahead of us. ”

What the clippers can’t do is give away basketballs. Jackson sailed in on a drive trying to pass the ball back to an indefinite white jersey. Bridges, whose versatility is only matched by his advantage, stole the pass and slammed it on the other side. That gave Phoenix a nine point lead with 2:38 to go. The Clippers had six of their nine sales in the second half and the Suns had none in the fourth quarter.

“I’ve had five ball losses and that’s five possession, a chance of 15 points that we didn’t get,” said Jackson, showing the league’s new tendency to measure everything by threes.

The Clippers seemed unfazed by this loss. George said they were used to building their game as the series progressed and finding ingenious ways to escape their captors. That hasn’t changed, but this time the door might be heavier, the ditch deeper.

The post Clippers Forced To Take Pop Quizzes In Phoenix, And Questions Got Too Hard - Daily Bulletin first appeared on Arizona Daily Press.

Category: Phoenix
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Triglyceride–Glucose Index and Nonalcoholic Liver Disease
Sun, 20 Jun 2021 21:43:39 GMT

Jing Liu,1– 3 Liying Guan,4 Meng Zhao,1,2,5 Qihang Li,2,3,5 An Song,6 Ling Gao,2,7,8 Haiyan Lin,4 Jiajun Zhao1,2,5,7

1Department of Endocrinology, Shandong Provincial Hospital, Affiliated to Shandong First Medical University, Jinan, Shandong, 250021, People’s Republic of China; 2Shandong Clinical Medical Center of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Affiliated to Shandong Provincial Hospital, Jinan, Shandong, 250021, People’s Republic of China; 3Shandong Institute of Endocrine and Metabolic Disease, Affiliated to Shandong Provincial Hospital, Jinan, Shandong, 250021, People’s Republic of China; 4Health Management Center, Shandong Provincial Hospital, Affiliated to Shandong First Medical University, Jinan, Shandong, People’s Republic of China; 5Department of Endocrinology, Shandong Provincial Hospital, Cheeloo College of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, 250021, People’s Republic of China; 6Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Affiliated to Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, 100730, People’s Republic of China; 7Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Endocrinology and Lipid Metabolism, Affiliated to Shandong Provincial Hospital, Jinan, Shandong, 250021, People’s Republic of China; 8Department of Scientific Center, Shandong Provincial Hospital, Affiliated to Shandong First Medical University, Jinan, Shandong, 250021, People’s Republic of China

Correspondence: Haiyan Lin
Health Management Center, Shandong Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong First Medical University, 324 Jing 5 Road, Jinan, Shandong, 250021, People’s Republic of China
Tel +86-531-68776123 (Clin.)
Fax +86-531-87068707
Email [email protected]Jiajun Zhao
Department of Endocrinology, Shandong Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong First Medical University, 324 Jing 5 Road, Jinan, Shandong, 250021, People’s Republic of China
Tel +86-531-68776375 (Clin.); +86-531-68776094 (Lab.)
Fax +86-531-87068707
Email [email protected]

Background: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is increasingly becoming a major health burden. Due to the difficulty of liver biopsy, there is no reliable indicator to evaluate the outcomes of NAFLD. The triglyceride–glucose (TyG) index is a simple and convenient marker of insulin resistance for use in medical practice. Whether the TyG index is predictive of later risk of NAFLD remains unknown.
Objective: To evaluate the relationship between TyG index with NAFLD progression and improvement during a median follow-up period of 21 months.
Material and Methods: A total of 11,424 subjects (9327 men) diagnosed with NAFLD were included. The TyG index was calculated as follows: ln [fasting triglycerides (mg/dL) * fasting glucose (mg/dL)/2]. Multivariable Cox regression analysis was applied to analyze the data.
Results: In this study, the severity of NAFLD remained the same in 38.8% of subjects, worsened in 17.4% of subjects, and improved in 43.8% of subjects. Compared with the lowest quartile of the TyG index, the adjusted HR of NAFLD progression in the highest quartile (TyG≥ 9.34) was 1.448 (1.229 to 1.706), and the adjusted HR of NAFLD improvement was 0.817 (0.723 to 0.923). Subgroup analysis found that smoking increased the correlation between the TyG index and the risk of NAFLD progression, while female, vegan diet, and weight control enhanced the correlation between the TyG index and the risk of NAFLD improvement.
Conclusion: The TyG index may be a simple and helpful indicator for further risk appraisal of NAFLD in daily clinical practice.

Keywords: triglyceride–glucose index, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, outcomes

Introduction

With economic growth and lifestyle changes, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of chronic liver disease worldwide, and the global prevalence of NAFLD has gradually increased year by year. Alarmingly, a recent meta-analysis of the epidemiology of NAFLD in 22 countries showed that its global prevalence was 25.2%,1 and the prevalence was found to be higher in urban areas than in rural areas.2 NAFLD is inextricably linked with type 2 diabetes (T2DM), metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular events, and chronic kidney disease and increases the risk of obstructive sleep apnoea, osteoporosis, and hypothyroidism.3–7 Therefore, the high incidence and concealed health dangers of NAFLD have become a public health issue that should not be ignored.

Although East Asians have a lower absolute body mass index (BMI) than Westerners, the former group is more vulnerable to visceral fat accumulation and insulin resistance (IR).8 NAFLD is a multifactorial disease, and IR is one of the several mechanisms underlying its pathogenesis. IR triggers oxidative stress and inflammation, promotes the development of NASH and liver fibrosis.9 The homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) is the most widely used indicator to evaluate the degree of IR. Determination of IR with HOMA-IR involves an insulin assay that lacks standardization, and the use is limited by the instability and expense of insulin, especially in primary healthcare clinics.10,11 Therefore, the triglyceride–glucose (TyG) index was proposed as a new, reliable marker of IR. The TyG index was calculated as the ln [fasting triglycerides (mg/dL) * fasting glucose (mg/dL)/2].12 The correlation between the TyG index and hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp (HEC) has been widely validated, and this index is also easier to obtain and more stable than HOMA.13 Its connections with cardiovascular events, T2DM and metabolic syndrome have been extensively studied.14–16 Moreover, cross-sectional studies in different populations indicated that the TyG index was higher in NAFLD patients and its accuracy and reliability in detecting NAFLD with a specificity of 60.1% and a sensitivity of 70.6%.17,18 However, these studies did not address the cause-effect relationship between the TyG index and NAFLD outcomes because of their cross-sectional nature.

In China, the management of NAFLD for family doctors and primary healthcare facilities has gradually become mainstream. If the outcomes of NAFLD can be clarified, the target population for treatment can be clarified. Detailed knowledge about the natural course of NAFLD is essential for the proper design of screening and follow-up programs. Needless to say, finding a reliable classification based on suitable biomarkers is crucially important in assessing the outcome of NAFLD. For these reasons, we used a large-scale urban health management cohort to explore the association between the TyG index and the outcomes of NAFLD, including its progression and improvement of NAFLD. Our study provides a convenient and sensitive indicator for NAFLD risk assessment.

Materials and Methods Ethical Statement

The study protocol was approved by the Ethics Committee of Shandong Provincial Hospital (Date of approval: 9-Jan-2019; no. 2019–002). This study was conducted in accordance with both the Declaration of Helsinki of 1975, as revised in 1983, and guidelines of the centre’s institutional review board. Since our research is a retrospective study using the data obtained in the previous diagnosis and treatment process, it will not adversely affect the rights and health of the subjects, and the personal identification information is protected. So, the Ethics Committee of Shandong Provincial Hospital has waived patient consent.

Study Population

This study is a longitudinal, retrospective cohort study. The subjects were 11,424 urban residents (aged ≥18 years) who underwent health examinations at the Health Management Center in Shandong Provincial Hospital (China) between January 2012 and December 2016. The subjects were followed two times, the median and maximum follow-up periods were 21 months and 59 months, respectively. The following categories were excluded: (1) patients with missing basic information; (2) patients without abdominal ultrasound data or non-NAFLD patients with abdominal ultrasound data; (3) patients with alcoholic fatty liver (AST/ALT>2 and a history of alcohol abuse);19,20 (4) patients with malignant tumours, viral hepatitis (hepatitis B or hepatitis C), cirrhosis or other disorders of the liver; and (5) women who were pregnant during the study. After the exclusion criteria were applied, 11,424 patients were recruited for the final analysis.

Physical Examinations and Laboratory Measurements

All study visits took place in the morning; at these visits, all subjects provided information on their medical history and lifestyle (such as dietary habits, smoking status, alcohol consumption, and exercise) through a questionnaire administered by trained interviewers. Height and weight were measured with an electronic scale and a wall-mounted stadiometer. The body mass index (BMI) was calculated using weight (kg) divided by the square of height (m2). Systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were measured twice in the right arm in a sitting position after a 15-minute rest, and the two replicate measurements were averaged. Blood samples were collected from the subjects after an overnight fast. Laboratory measurements of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), hepatitis B surface antigen and anti-hepatitis C virus antibodies, were performed using an ARCHITECT ci16200 Integrated System (Abbott, Illinois, USA).

Ascertainment of NAFLD

The diagnosis of NAFLD was determined using abdominal ultrasound with standardized criteria. An experienced radiologist who was blinded to the patients’ clinical information performed the scans using a LOGIQ P6 apparatus (GE Ultrasound in Korea). Ultrasound diagnosis can divide NAFLD into three grades: mild, moderate and severe. According to ultrasonographic findings, the outcomes of NAFLD were classified as disease stability, progression, or improvement. Specifically, the stability of NAFLD was defined as the same severity of NAFLD at the end of follow-up compared to baseline, progression of NAFLD was defined as an increase in the severity of NAFLD at the end of follow-up as compared with the baseline and improvement of NAFLD was defined remission or regression to a less severe state at the end of follow-up than baseline.

Statistical Analysis

All metric variables conforming to a normal distribution are expressed as the mean ± standard deviation, and all metric variables with a skewed distribution are presented as the median and quartiles. For normally distributed data, comparisons among more than two groups were performed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and comparisons between two groups were conducted by Fisher’s least significant difference (LSD) test. If the distribution was skewed, a Kruskal–Wallis test by ranks was used for comparisons among more than two groups, and the Mann–Whitney U-test was used for comparisons between two groups. Enumeration data are expressed as the rate (%), and a chi-square test was applied. The follow-up period for each participant was computed as the time from the date of the first visit (baseline) to the date of change in the degree of NAFLD (61.2%) or the end of follow-up (December 31, 2016), whichever came first.

In order to examine the association between the TyG index and NAFLD outcomes, the TyG index was divided into four groups (Q1

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Violent Colorado arrest puts spotlight on how police treat disabled people
Thu, 17 Jun 2021 17:16:35 GMT


A body camera video recorded the arrest of Karen Garner on June 26, 2020, in Loveland, Colorado. Garner, 73 at the time, has dementia and sensory aphasia. (Loveland Police Department)

Violent Colorado Arrest Puts Spotlight on How Police Treat Disabled People” first appeared at khn.org.

Nearly a year after police officers in Loveland injured an elderly woman with dementia and then laughed at footage of her arrest, two of those officers are facing criminal charges while the rest of the department undergoes additional training. The fallout has drawn national attention to a problem that experts say is widespread across law enforcement agencies: Police often lack the skills to interact with people with mental and physical disabilities.

Last June, a Walmart employee called police after Karen Garner, 73 at the time, tried to leave without paying for $14 worth of items. Soon after, Officer Austin Hopp’s body camera video showed, he pulled over beside her as she walked down a road and wrestled her to the ground in handcuffs after she failed to respond to his questions. Afterward, Garner’s lawyers say, she sat in jail for several hours with a dislocated and fractured shoulder as Hopp and two other officers laughed while watching the body camera video.

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According to a federal complaint, Garner has dementia and also suffers from sensory aphasia, which impairs her ability to understand. Her violent arrest has other elderly people worried about potential encounters with police, Loveland resident June Dreith told Police Chief Robert Ticer during a public meeting last month.

“They are now seriously afraid of the police department,” Dreith said.

Hopp resigned and faces felony charges of assault and attempting to influence a public servant — a charge related to allegations of omissions when reporting the arrest — as well as official misconduct, a misdemeanor. Another officer, Daria Jalali, also resigned and is charged with three misdemeanors: failure to report excessive force, failure to intervene and official misconduct. Neither has entered a plea in court. A third officer, who watched the video with them, resigned but has not been charged.

An independent assessment of the Loveland Police Department by a third-party consultant is underway. The city and involved officers face a federal lawsuit, filed by Garner in April, alleging excessive use of force and violations of the Americans With Disabilities Act.

Ticer declined to be interviewed, but through his public information officer he characterized the Garner incident as a problem with an individual officer, not with the department’s operations.

Loveland Police Chief Robert Ticer characterized Garner’s rough arrest as an issue with an individual officer, not with the department’s operations. The city’s police are now undergoing Alzheimer’s awareness training. (Leigh Paterson)

“Our training currently, in the past and present, is always to make sure our officers are up to speed on as much training as they can on how to interact with people in crisis who may have mental health issues,” Ticer said during the public meeting in May at department headquarters.

Loveland’s police department, like many others, requires officers to be trained to respond to people with mental illness and developmental disabilities. But no national standards exist. That means the amount of training law enforcement officers receive on interacting with disabled people varies widely.

“On the whole, we’re doing terrible,” said Jim Burch, president of the National Police Foundation, a nonprofit organization focused on police research and training. “We have to do much, much better at being able to recognize these types of issues and being more sensitive to them.”

While comprehensive data on the frequency of negative interactions between police and people with mental disabilities is lacking, interactions with the criminal justice system are common. The Bureau of Justice Statistics has estimated about 3 in 10 state and federal prisoners and 4 in 10 local jail inmates have at least one disability.

“There’s a very large number of people that police are coming into contact with that have an intellectual disability or mental health challenge,” Burch said. “Do we have a systemic problem? We think that we do.”

Colorado requires a minimum of two hours of training on interacting with people with disabilities, although legislation aims to improve on that by creating a commission to recommend new statewide standards.

Loveland’s officers are certified in crisis intervention training. The department also has a co-responder program, which pairs law enforcement officers with mental health clinicians, although this team was not called during Garner’s arrest. Since that incident, questions remain about the department’s readiness to interact with disabled citizens.

“We could always use more and more training. We could train every single week for eight hours a day, but we could do that all the time and never go out on calls,” said Sgt. Brandon Johnson, who oversees training. “It’s just balancing our available workforce and our time and our service to the community and our staffing levels.”

Loveland police officers are now undergoing Alzheimer’s awareness training, and five staff members will be trained as de-escalation instructors, department officials said.

Going beyond officer training

Training on how to interact with disabled people varies, but the basics include identifying such individuals early in an encounter instead of relying on use of force.

“It’s scary, because you don’t know why they’re not following your commands,” said Ali Thompson, a former deputy with the Boulder County Sheriff’s Office who now serves on the Colorado Developmental Disabilities Council. “So, your adrenaline starts pumping and you think … ‘They’re not listening to my commands because they have a warrant or because they have a gun on them,’ or you come up with all of these scenarios to explain it.”

Garner’s rough arrest is “not an isolated incident by any means,” Thompson said. She said she would not have thought to attribute noncompliance to conditions like autism or dementia when she was a young patrol officer.

“We need to start bringing those possibilities into those ‘what if’ scenarios,” Thompson said.

In addition to teaching how to identify disabled people, organizations such as the International Association of Chiefs of Police help prepare officers for such situations by showing them how to speak in short phrases, refrain from touching, and turn off sirens and flashing lights. Research on which disability-specific efforts actually reduce bad outcomes is scant, but experts point to other types of curricula as relevant, too, including crisis intervention training, instruction on de-escalating tensions and sessions on mental illness.

“Just training in and of itself is not going to create that long-term change that we are hoping for,” said Lee Ann Davis, director of criminal justice initiatives at The ARC, a national disability advocacy organization.

That means going beyond officer training to address the many areas in which people with disabilities are not being identified and supported, she said. One of The ARC’s programs, Pathways to Justice, brings in not only law enforcement officials but also attorneys and victim service providers for instruction.

“So our goal is to help communities understand that this is a communitywide issue, that there’s not one specific spoke within the criminal justice system or in our communities that can address it adequately alone,” Davis said.

Johnson, the Loveland sergeant in charge of training, said officers have been engaged for years in community outreach such as supporting the Special Olympics.

Despite the actions of the three officers who resigned, Johnson believes the department is adequately prepared to interact with disabled citizens. At the same time, he acknowledges limitations.

“We have to be the first responder. We have to have a good foundational understanding of all of it,” he said. “But we’re also not … we’re also not experts.”

KHN (Kaiser Health News) is a national newsroom that produces in-depth journalism about health issues. Together with Policy Analysis and Polling, KHN is one of the three major operating programs at KFF (Kaiser Family Foundation). KFF is an endowed nonprofit organization providing information on health issues to the nation.

 

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Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh cleaners collect for contract, wage increase – WPXI
Sun, 20 Jun 2021 23:16:19 GMT

PITTSBURGH – Contract negotiations are ongoing between the Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh and their commercial cleaners.

Workers said they were only offered pennies for the dollar despite risking their lives during the pandemic.

Commercial cleaners and other service workers International Union union members gathered outside the Carnegie Museum in Oakland to fight for a fair living.

The workers said they are among the worst paid cleaners in Pittsburgh, and now they say they are being offered small wage increases.

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Noon today on Channel 11 News – With contract negotiations going nowhere, these commercial cleaners gather outside the Carnegie Museum for a fair living. #wpxi pic.twitter.com/UC0KW0ygkn

– Lori Houy (@WPXI_Lori) June 18, 2021

Pittsburgh mayoral candidate Ed Gainey was there to assist the cleaners.

“We all put ourselves at risk to make sure the kids get inside safely,” said commercial cleaner Andrew Stewart.

The contract renewal for 25 members of SEIU branch 32BJ expired in May.

“You put a wage freeze in the middle of the pandemic last year. They are among the worst paid cleaners in the entire city of Pittsburgh, ”said Sam Williamson, a member of SEIU 32BJ.

The only sticking point in contract negotiations are wages.

Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh sent Channel 11 a statement stating, “We have had a long, constructive relationship with the SEIU that has been shaped by a series of fair and mutually negotiated contracts. We are currently in negotiations with the SEIU and have a proposal on the table that the union should consider. “

The post Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh cleaners collect for contract, wage increase - WPXI first appeared on LABOR NEWS WIRE.

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THE STRING CHEESE INCIDENT ANNOUNCES 2021 TOUR DATES
Tue, 15 Jun 2021 18:21:59 GMT
PLUS FESTIVAL APPEARANCES AT PEACH FEST, BACKWOODS, HULAWEEN AND MORE

 

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The String Cheese Incident has announced a 13-city tour across the US. The String Cheese Incident is known for their high-energy live shows packed with extended improvisation and genre-transcendent approach to music. In addition to the recently announced 5-night Colorado run this July, the band will be making stops throughout the Midwest and Southeast, as well as festival appearances at Peach Music Festival, Backwoods, and Suwannee Hulaween.
For all up to date news, and to purchase tickets visit stringcheeseincident.com.

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Tour Dates:July 4 @ Peach Music Festival | Scranton, PAJuly 13-14 @ Dillon Amphitheater | Dillon, COJuly 16-18 @ Red Rocks Amphitheatre | Morrison, COAug 13-14 @ Iroquois Amphitheater | Louisville, KYAug 15 @ Express Live! | Columbus, OHAug 17-18 @ Greenfield Lake Amphitheater | Wilmington, NCAug 19 @ Ting Pavilion | Charlottesville, VAAug 20-22 @ Salvage Station | Asheville, NCAug 24-25 @ Brooklyn Bowl | Nashville, TNAug 26-27 @ The Big Top | St. Louis, MOAug 28 @ Backwoods at Mulberry Mountain | Ozark, ARAug 29-31 @ Suwannee Hulaween | Live Oak, FLNov 4-6 @ Stubb’s Waller Creek Amphitheater | Austin, TX

About The String Cheese Incident:The past three decades have written a story packed full of surreal experiences, epic moments, groundbreaking involvement and huge accomplishments. The String Cheese Incident has been recognized for their commitment to musical creativity and integrity, for their community spirit, philanthropic endeavors, and for their innovative approach to the business of music.
When The String Cheese Incident’s growth first started gaining momentum in the 1990s, as the Internet was just beginning to take hold and the major-label business model was failing, the band decided to make music on their own terms.
Since then, The String Cheese Incident has gone on to carve out a completely unique approach to the business of music; they are truly pioneers of a new way of “making a band.” With the Internet as their tool, SCI was among the first artists to disseminate information online, such as tour dates, release information, and other news, to their growing fan base. Rather than doing business on such terms as “the bottom line,” SCI put their music and their fans first, opening companies of their own, including a ticketing company, a merchandise company and a fan travel agency, to best serve their community. The band’s record label, SCI Fidelity Records, has always operated under the same ideals. Even early on, SCI Fidelity embraced downloadable music and file sharing, delivering SCI’s “On The Road” series, where every show the band plays is made available for download on the Internet. Whether they realized it at the time or not, The String Cheese Incident was inventing grassroots band development. Today, literally hundreds of bands are using some version of this same approach to build their brand.
The String Cheese Incident’s commitment goes well beyond their immediate community, and even beyond the music community as a whole. Early on, the band took a serious interest in giving back to the communities that they visited, and they were among the first performers to encourage “Green” shows and tours. SCI’s support has helped give rise to such not-for-profit organizations as Conscious Alliance and HeadCount. All the while, The String Cheese Incident has stayed committed to music as a creative endeavor, not just in their recordings but also in their live performances. The list of SCI’s special guests and collaborators is long and diverse. Their annual events such as Electric Forest and Hulaween, and holiday shows such as New Year’s Eve, have helped redefine the concert experience and have garnered the band a reputation as live music vibe innovators.

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Wood County Republicans take aim at For the People Act | News, Sports, Jobs
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 04:14:36 GMT
Wood County Republicans take aim at For the People Act | News, Sports, Jobs

PARKERSBURG – The Wood County Republican Party’s Executive Committee is preparing a resolution to encourage the two US Senators from West Virginia to oppose the For the People Act and reforms of the filibuster rule, the chairman said Friday.

The For the People Act, Resolution 1 of the House of Representatives, is generally opposed or partially supported, where Republicans are against and Democrats are in favor. Opponents claim it will open elections to fraud, but proponents say it will make it easier to vote in federal elections, end the restructuring of congressional districts and, among other things, increase protection against foreign participation.

Same-day registration is one of the elements that can lead to fraud, said Roger Conley, Wood County’s GOP chairman. One person can register for one poll, go to another and re-register and vote, he said.

The resolution also says the law includes unattended drop box locations, ballot collection, ballot acceptance up to 10 days after an election, voting offenders, and other issues, Conley said.

“All of these things can lead to greater inappropriateness on election day” said Conley.

The resolution will be discussed in a special meeting of the Executive Committee on Tuesday. Sens. Joe Manchin and Shelley Moore Capito also called for opposition to reforms of the filibuster rule.

“This, if passed, would silence the minority political party and damage efforts to come together in bipartisan working relationships.” said the resolution. Republicans are the minority in the Senate and House of Representatives.

The goal is to have the resolution in the hands of the two senators by the end of the week, said Conley.

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The post Wood County Republicans take aim at For the People Act | News, Sports, Jobs first appeared on DAILY POLITICAL PRESS.

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High school rodeo champions crowned
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 03:25:03 GMT

HASTINGS – Nebraska High School’s rodeo season ended last weekend with the Hastings High School Finals at the Adams County Fairgrounds.

Rodeo athletes from across the state of Cornhusker competed in two rounds from June 17th to 18th and the short run on June 19th.

The top four participants in each of the 15 events have been determined and will compete in the National High School Finals Rodeo (NHSFR) in Lincoln, Nebraska, at the Lancaster Events Center from July 18-24.

The girl rookie of the year is Clancy Jo Brown of North Platte. The boys ‘rookie of the year is Elsmere’s Hayden Stump, and the Cooper Bass is the boys’ all-around year-end champion; Wacey Day is the year-end all-round girl champion. G

The overall winner of the Girls ‘State Final was Madison Mills of Eddyville, and the overall winner of the Boys’ State Final went to Tate Talkington of Scottsbluff.

The 2021-22 Miss Nebraska High School rodeo queen is Ashton Werth, Hyannis.

The 2020-21 champions are Spencer Denaeyer, Seneca, bareback; Elle Ravenscroft, Nenzel, barrel races; Cooper Bass, Brewster, guys cut; Jaya Nelson, Bassett, breakaway rope; Hunter Boydston, Grover, Colorado, bull riding; Mekenna Fisher, Hershey, Girls cut; Wacey Day, Fleming, Colorado, goat tying; Madison Mills, Eddyville, bar bending; Brody McAbee, Ansley, riding horses; Dane Pokorny, Stapleton, direct wrestling; Hayes Wetzel, Palmer, Team Roping Headers; Ryan Shepherd, North Platte, Team roping heeler; Tate Talkington, Scottsbluff, lashing straps; Tatum Olson, Bloomfield, pure cow horse; Jate Saults, Big Springs, light rifle shooting and Tanner Ellis, Minden, trap shooting.

Below are summaries of some of the champions.

Barrel Racing Champion – Elle Ravenscroft, Nenzel

Elle Ravenscroft led the field year round, with her competitors in the rearview mirror.

The Nenzel cowgirl led the barrel racing standings all year round and was even awarded a bobble at the state finals as state champion in barrel racing 2021.

In the state, she went 20 points ahead of cowgirl # 2, Taci Flinn. In the first round she was fifth; in the second round she tipped a barrel to add a 5 second penalty to her time and remove her from the rankings.

In the short lap she finished second behind Flinn. “She was on my back for the entire finale,” said Ravenscroft. “Being hunted is not a great feeling. I had great competition and that was a bit intimidating at times. “

She didn’t realize she’d won the state title until the spokesman mentioned it. “I held my breath,” she said.

She is excited to be competing at the NHSFR in Lincoln because of the proximity. “It’s hometown. I think there will be pressure to represent your state well. I’m really excited. “

The 2021 graduate of Cody-Kilgore High School will not be attending the college rodeo. She will play basketball at Chadron State College, where she is graduating with an exercise and health degree.

She was recruited by both basketball and rodeo coaches, but chose basketball. “To be honest, that was a big decision. I decided we were going to try basketball. In summer I can always rodeo. I wanted to have the opportunity to play basketball because rodeo will always be there. “

She is the daughter of Eric and Shannon Ravenscroft.

Bareback Riding Master – Spencer Denaeyer, Seneca

Spencer Denaeyer was the only bareback rider to make three qualified drives on the state to win the state title.

When he reached the state finals, he was three and a half points behind Tanner Drueke.

“I just went in very motivated because I knew I had my job,” he said. “I had to chase people and I honestly think that improved my performance more than anything.”

This is his second qualification for the NHSFR; his first was as a newbie who wasn’t going the way he’d like. That is an incentive for this year. “I think it’s time to capitalize on the fact that it’s in Lincoln. It’s time to give it my all and compete with all the year-end champions. It’s going to be tough. It’s time to hit the pedal. “

Denaeyer will be a senior at Mullen High School this fall; participates in soccer, wrestling and athletics and was on the honor roll for two quarters this year.

He is the son of Martin and Bree Denaeyer.

Goat Tying Masters – Wacey Day, Fleming, Colo.

The closest race of all events was the goat tying, with 18-year-old cowgirl Wacey Day winning the title one point ahead of cowgirl # 2, Jessica Stevens.

It was a roller coaster year, with ups and downs all season, but Wacey dominated the state, winning both the first and second rounds and the short rounds. “I had no choice but to do this if I wanted to win,” she said.

She also finished second in Breakaway Roping and will also compete in the Nationals. This is her fourth trip to the Nationals.

The 2021 Lone Star High School Class Salutator will attend Northeastern Junior College in Sterling, Colorado this fall and complete her qualifications before moving to another school to pursue a certification in radiology. She becomes collegiate rodeo, goat tying, breakaway roping, barrel racing and team roping.

Wacey, the daughter of Shane and Heather Day, is also the overall winner at the end of the year.

Bar Bending Masters – Madison Mills, Eddyville

Madison Mills’ 2021 pole-bending title was the third state championship the Eddyville cowgirl has won.

She ran the state year-round and felt a little bit pressured by freshman Clancy Jo Brown, but after four years of high school and two years of junior high, she taught herself to deal with the pressures.

“I’ve learned how to deal with it and calm my nerves,” she said. “I say to myself, ‘This is nothing new, I’ve been doing this for six years (through high school and junior high rodeo), we practice all week,’ so I trust my horse and my own riding skills and that’s how I calm down. “

The Sumner-Eddyville-Miller High School graduate will attend Mid-Plains Community College in McCook this fall to study criminal justice. In order to be able to concentrate on her studies, she decided to forego college rodeo for at least the first year. “Rodeo is going to take a lot of time and practice, and I’d rather focus on school,” she said.

She also took third place in the barrels and will also take part in the Nationals.

She is the daughter of Matt and Melissa McTygue.

Light Gun Master – Jate Saults, Big Springs

Jate Saults is the Nebraska State High School Rodeo Association’s Light Gun Champion.

The state competition was held in an indoor shooting range, which was a plus, he said, without bad weather affecting competitors.

With 298 out of 320 points, he achieved a personal best. “That was a really good day for me.”

This will be Saults’ third trip to the Nationals in shooting; he will also compete in Team Roping at the NHSFR after finishing second with a header from Brent Charlton.

He’s ready for the Nationals in Lincoln. “I look forward to representing Nebraska. I think a lot of kids will like how big our city is and how much there is to do. If you’re in Rock Springs (Wyoming, where previous NHSFR events took place), it’s in the middle of nowhere. “

Full results can be found at http://www.hsrodeo-nebraska.com/results. For more information on the State Finals and the NHSFR, please visit www.hsrodeo-nebraska.com, www.NHSFRLincoln.org and www.nhsra.com.

###

Nebraska High School Qualifiers, 2021 National High School Finals Rodeo in Lincoln. 18.-24. July.

Riding bareback:

Champion: Spencer Denaeyer, Seneca

2. Tanner Drueke, Sutherland

3. Cole Kerner, Sutherland

4. Tate Miller, Springview

Barrel races

Champion: Elle Ravenscroft, Nenzel

2. Taci Flinn, Arcadia

3. Madison Mills, Eddyville

4. Jenae Whitaker, Chambers

Alternatively – Clancy Jo Brown, North Platte

Boys cut:

Champion: Cooper Bass, Brewster

2. Hayden Jennings, Seneca

3. Cody Miller, Broken Bow

4. Bo Bushhousen, St. Libory

Alternatively – Tatum Olson, Bloomfield

Tear-off ropes

Champion: Jaya Nelson, Bassett

2nd Wacey Day, Fleming, Colorado.

3. Jace Hurlburt, Arcadia

4. Tehya From, Crookston

Alternatively – Emma Ohm, Hyannis

Bull riding:

Champion:. Hunter Boydston, Grover, Colorado.

2. Cole Kerner, Sutherland

3. Tanner Drueke, Sutherland

4. Dalton Garey, Broken Arch

Alternatively – Drew Farrell, Merriman

Girls cut:

Champion: Mekenna Fisher, Hershey

2. Peyton Fisher, Hershey

3. Faith store, Arthur

4. Whitney Jennings, Seneca

Alternative -Emma Pearson, Broken Bow

Goat binding:

Champion:. Wacey Day, Fleming, Colorado.

2. Jessica Stevens, Creighton

3. Emma Ohm, Hyannis

4. Kaci Wickersham, verdigris

Alternatively – Kinley Greenough, Kearney

Pole bending

Champion: Madison Mills, Eddyville

2. Clancy Jo Brown, North Platte

3. Abigail Lawton, Overton

4. Jenae Whitaker, Chambers

Alternatively – Lauren Lehl, Allianz

Riding in the saddle

Champion: Brody McAbee, Ansley

2. Leif Meidell, Harrison

3. Monty Bailey, Lakeside

4. Dean Schroeder, Taylor

Alternatively – Augustus Painter, Ainsworth

Steer wrestling

Champion: Dane Pokorny, Stapleton

2. Coy Johnston, Stapleton

3. Rhett Witt, Valentin

4. Rex Day, Bartlett

Alternatively – Gage Davis, Cody

Team abseiling

Champions: Hayse Wetzel, Palmer and Ryan Shepherd, North Platte.

2. Brent Charlton, North Platte and Jate Saults, Big Springs

3. Cooper Bass, Brewster and Zack Bradley, Brewster

4. Jace Hurlburt, Arcadia and Tate Talkington, Scottsbluff

Alternatively – Jasper Neal, Amherst, Sage Dieter, Alma

Lashing straps

Champion: Tate Talkington, Scottsbluff

2. Layne Wallinger, Stuart

2. Travnicek, Minatars. follow

4. Matthew Miller, Callaway

Alternatively – Rhett Witt, Valentine

Pure cow horse

Champion: Tatum Olson, Bloomfield

2. Tate Talkington, Scottsbluff

3 (tie) Charlie Bortner, McCook, and Tucker Gillespie, McCook

Alternatively – Hope Brosius, Enders

Light rifle shooting

Champion: Jate Saults, Big Springs

2. Cooper Phillips, Burwell

3. Kalyn Nielsen, verdigris

4. Hope Brosius, Enders

Alternatively – Justin Wenzel, Arthur

Trap shooting

Champion: Tanner Ellis, Minden

2. Ashton Higgins, Nelig

3. Justin Wenzel, Arthur

4. Ty Growcock, Barlett

Alternatively – Shealynn Rasmussen, Burwell

© 2021 The North Platte Bulletin. All rights reserved.

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Plant Scarcity Follows Horticulture Boom – thecherrycreeknews.com
Sun, 20 Jun 2021 16:33:23 GMT
Plant Scarcity Follows Horticulture Boom - thecherrycreeknews.com

Juniper Level Botanical Garden – Raleigh, North Carolina

“The horticultural boom of 2020 will continue well into 2021,” said Tony Avent, founder and owner of the Juniper Level Botanic Garden and Plant Delights Nursery in Raleigh. “Last year the boom among existing gardeners really started. The longer COVID lasted, the more orders we received from Generation Xers and Millennials. We’re also seeing a staggering number of even younger gardeners in 2021. Some don’t own a home and are looking for things to grow indoors. The indoor plant madness is insane.

“In addition, there is an almost unprecedented shortage of plants in America, especially for plants with long production times such as trees and shrubs. Many box stores, where 60 percent of Americans buy their plants, are in short supply. Retailers who do not propagate plants struggle to offer a wide range of plants for sale. We are very lucky because we are promoting most of the things here, but it is still difficult for us to keep up with the demand. “

Juniper Level Botanic Garden, a gift to NC State University, will open for public viewing and plant purchases over two weekends this summer, July 16-18 and July 23-25. There is no admission and the opening times are Friday and Saturday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. GPS directions, 9241 Sauls Road, Raleigh.

“We will be giving away our visitors in our Summer Open Garden Pads with prickly pear cactus,” said Avent. “I’ve always been fascinated by cacti so we decided to see how many we can grow. We now have over 150 different prickly pear species – probably the largest collection in the world. Since we rule them annually, we give our visitors cactus pads as a gift. You can plant them at home and enjoy the North American prickly pear cactus. The flower colors range from the spectrum of the rainbow, and the cactus is edible. Indians have been using this cactus as a food crop for years.

“There are so many amazing plants blooming in summer and the pollinator activity is incredible. Then all the insects and birds collect nectar that they need to survive. If you want a lot of pollinator activity in your garden in the summer, you need plants that are blooming.

“Young homeowners are very environmentally conscious and understand the benefits of an abundance of different plants, while the older generation focused much more on functionality in the garden. The younger people are much more interested in sustainable gardening and looking for a better life without chemicals in the garden. The previous generation was ingrained with the mantra “live better with chemicals”.

“It’s funny, our generation, the boomers, were generally afraid of insects and brought up that insects were bad. But the younger generations have been taught that insects are really an important part of nature – the more insects you have, the more nature you can bring into your garden and the healthier the entire environment becomes. It’s a nice transition to watch.

“Adults and children are welcome to come to the Open Garden Days and learn more about insects from our entomologist Bill Reynolds. Bill used to be at the Museum of Natural Science; he is down to earth, loves nature and likes to talk to children. Bill is an insect collector who is also an expert on cicadas, which are very on the news. Bill told me something I didn’t know. “Cicadas are the only insect that sweats”. You and your children can learn a lot from Bill.

Prickly Pear Cactus – Juniper Level Botanic Garden – Raleigh, North Carolina

“We hope that by visiting the Juniper Level Botanic Garden, people will learn to look at the outside of their home as well as the inside. Garden designers have known this for years, but for many it is a new concept. So much is going on outside. Go outside, get in the nature and create special spaces to have birds, bees, frogs and cool things that you will not have in your home.

“It is also imperative that people put on their Citizen Scientist hats and help conserve plants in their gardens. Plants are dying out at a pretty incredible rate, and unfortunately some people want to hoard or replant them where they are already extinct. We are the opposite. If you want to preserve a plant, plant it, propagate it, and divide it.

“As soon as we have sufficient funds in our Operational Endowment Foundation at NC State University, the Juniper Level Botanic Garden will be open to the public on a permanent basis all year round. But unfortunately, COVID has slowed our fundraising in the last 18 months. It’s hard to ask large sums of money from someone in a mask. It’s actually pretty sticky. Now that we are exposed, we hope we can get back to some major fundraiser. But if we could get a million people to donate $ 17 each, we’re here. We are open. It doesn’t take any more, ”said Avent.

The post Plant Scarcity Follows Horticulture Boom - thecherrycreeknews.com first appeared on GLENDALE CHERRY CREEK CHRONICLE.

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‘Our shelter is bursting’: North Myrtle Beach businesses sponsor pet adoption fees
Sun, 20 Jun 2021 01:45:07 GMT
‘Our shelter is bursting’: North Myrtle Beach businesses sponsor pet adoption fees

Chihuahua (Photo: MGN Online)

NORTH MYRTLE BEACH, SC (WBTW) The Humane Society of North Myrtle Beach works with animal shelters across South Carolina by participating in the statewide adoption event called Pick Me SC.

Adoption fees for adult cats and dogs adopted by the Humane Society of North Myrtle Beach are sponsored by area companies: Anthony Green Real Estate, Murray Law, Elliot Coastal Living, Atlantic Heating & Cooling, Remax-Southern Shores, and Anderson Brothers Bank. Adoptions include spay / neuter surgery, vaccines, deworming, flea prevention, and microchips.

The event will take place from June 18th to June 27th.

Read more here.

The post ‘Our shelter is bursting’: North Myrtle Beach businesses sponsor pet adoption fees first appeared on REALESTATE NEWS24.

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1 lifeless, at least 3 injured after shooting in southwest Grand Rapids
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 02:02:05 GMT
1 dead, at least 3 injured after shooting in southwest Grand Rapids

GRAND RAPIDS, Michigan (WOOD) – Grand Rapids police responded early Sunday morning to several incidents that they believe may be related to a shooting in the southwest of the city.

At around 3:50 a.m., GRPD received calls about a possible shooting in the Ellsworth Avenue and Goodrich Street area. Upon arriving at the scene, police found a black car with three people in it that went off the street and crashed into a building near the corner of Ellsworth and Goodrich, just down the street from the Founders Brewing Company.

One person in the vehicle was a man who suffered multiple gunshot wounds when it hit the building. Despite the police’s efforts to save his life, he died on the spot from his injuries.

The other two inmates were slightly injured women.

GRPD officers were also called in to a crash in the Bridge Street NW and Scribner Avenue NW area. All occupants of the car were adults and were slightly injured in the crash. Police believe the occupants of the vehicle may have been involved in the shooting, and investigators are continuing their investigation.

Regardless of those two scenes, police say that some time after the GRPD arrived, a person was dropped off at a local hospital with a gunshot wound. The person had surgery for their wounds and their condition is currently unknown.

Detectives encourage anyone with information to call 616.456.3380 or anonymous tips. to send Silent observer at 616.774.2345. Videos of each of the incidents can be shared with investigators below GRPDinfo@grcity.us or on the department’s social media pages.

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The post 1 lifeless, at least 3 injured after shooting in southwest Grand Rapids first appeared on Wolverine State Watch.

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NYC Construction Jobs Slow Rebound Threatens Economic Comeback
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 03:02:50 GMT
MTA Chief Development Officer Janno Lieber (right) and Governor Andrew Cuomo lead a tour of the East Side Access station beneath Grand Central Terminal, May 27, 2021.

by Greg David orignally published in thecity.nyc

As New York City climbs out of the deep pandemic-dug economic hole, the construction industry is flashing a warning signal for how difficult it will be to recover from the worst downturn since the Great Depression.

Despite being one of the first industries allowed to resume work after the shutdown 15 months ago, New York City’s building sector remains 25,000 jobs below its pre-coronavirus peak.

Hopes to plow through the withering backlog of planned construction largely rest on President Joe Biden’s efforts to pass an infrastructure plan with a price tag of around $1 trillion. Meanwhile, uncertainty over who the next mayor will be and Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s political fate injects more unknowns at a critical time.

“The best and fastest way to restart New York’s economy and get people back to work is through large-scale infrastructure projects supported by the federal government. In the wake of such a challenging and devastating period, the building industry is primed to lead the recovery across our country,” said Carlo Scissura, chief executive of the New York Building Congress.

The city added 41,300 jobs in May, the fourth consecutive month of increases as the unemployment rate fell to 10.9% from 11.4% in April, the state Labor Department reported last week. The biggest gains came in restaurants and the arts — the two sectors hit the hardest by the coronavirus crisis — and transportation.

Still, New York remains 510,000 jobs below its pre-pandemic total of almost 4.7 million. On a percentage basis, only San Francisco and Los Angeles have regained fewer jobs than New York among the nation’s 10 largest cities, according to an analysis by James Parrott, an economist at the New School.

Meanwhile, the city’s unemployment rate is nearly twice the national average.

How the Bottom Fell Out

The construction industry is crucial because it provides relatively high-paying jobs that don’t require advanced degrees, becoming an economic lifeline for many immigrants and workers of color.

The average salary in the industry reached $87,200 in 2020, the fourth highest of any sector in the city, according to a new report from the state comptroller’s office. Immigrants hold about half the jobs, most from Latin America and the Caribbean.

About a quarter of the jobs go to commuters from the suburbs. Hispanics and white workers each comprise about a third of the workforce.

“Walk on to a construction site today and you will see the diverse makeup of the workforce,” said Gary LaBarbera, president of the Building and Construction Trades Council, an umbrella union group.

He added that 68% of all apprentices are workers of color.

The pandemic disrupted what had been a decade-long expansion based on the city’s booming economy, helping fuel its record gains.

The industry added jobs for eight consecutive years through 2019, bringing the total to an all-time high of 161,300 — making construction the fastest-growing sector over that period. Construction spending grew an average of 20% during that time, reaching a record of $61 billion in 2019.

Then the bottom fell out.

Spending plunged by $5 billion the next year and is expected to remain flat for at least two years. Only two new projects of more than 300,000 square feet pursued permits in the first three months of the year. That’s compared to applications for 405 such projects last year.

“When we have seen other downturns, it has usually taken the construction industry up to five years to get back to where it was,” said State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli.

Airport and Jails Loom Large

Even maintaining current levels of activity and jobs depends primarily on government spending. Insiders expect a post-pandemic travel boom will spur an acceleration of the Cuomo-pushed $15 billion Kennedy Airport overhaul. But last week, the governor’s controversial plan to build a $2 billion AirTrain to LaGuardia Airport got delayed by the feds at a time when he faces investigations over sexual harassment accusations.

The industry is also counting on the city’s $8.5 billion program to replace Rikers Island with smaller jails in four of the five boroughs, though it isn’t clear if the next mayor will be committed to the plan — the major candidates have a variety of stances. It’s also unknown how friendly to development Mayor Bill de Blasio’s replacement will be.

The long-delayed federal approval of the Gateway tunnel project under Hudson River offered a potential boost for construction jobs, pending an infrastructure package passage. But elsewhere on the transportation front, the MTA’s ambitious $51 billion capital plan remains precarious given the agency’s financial woes as ridership improves, but remains well below pre-pandemic levels.

MTA Chief Development Officer Janno Lieber (right) and Governor Andrew Cuomo lead a tour of the East Side Access station beneath Grand Central Terminal, May 27, 2021.

Kevin P. Coughlin/Governor Cuomo’s Office

Also at risk are 100 hotel projects that remain in the pipeline — half of which are in the boroughs outside of Manhattan. With tourism so far below economically profitable levels for hotels, cancellation of some of those projects seems likely.

The key to the construction industry’s fortunes, stakeholders say, will be the size of whatever infrastructure program the Biden Administration is able to get through Congress and where the money will go.

“So much of what has kept the construction industry going is government spending,” said DiNapoli. The pending proposal for there to be a major infrastructure industry out of Washington would be a home run for us.”


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The post NYC Construction Jobs Slow Rebound Threatens Economic Comeback first appeared on Gotham Weekly.

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Boy in e-scooter collision with automotive in Khor Fakkan. critically injured
Sun, 20 Jun 2021 10:11:34 GMT

A 13-year-old boy from the Emirates suffered serious injuries when his e-scooter collided with a car in Khor Fakkan on Saturday.

Sharjah Police Department Colonel Ali Alkai Al Hamoudi said the Emirates driver could not avoid meeting the teenager in the Al Zabara neighborhood.

“We received the report on Saturday night and sent patrols and the national ambulance to the site,” he said.

The boy was taken to the hospital. The police did not provide any details about the boy’s injuries.

Sharjah police warned against the reckless use of e-scooters and bicycles and urged users to ensure they wear protective gear. The scooters are very popular in many areas.

Police said nearly 2,000 bicycles and scooters have been confiscated since January.

“A campaign launched by Sharjah Police and the community that resulted in the confiscation of nearly 181 e-scooters from different parts of the emirate,” said Lt. Col. Mohammed Allai Al Naqbi, director of the Sharjah Police Department’s Transportation Department.

Driving in non-designated areas, users who do not wear protective equipment and who do not follow the safety rules are the most common offenses committed by e-scooter drivers, said Lt. Col. Al Naqbi.

He urged road users to adhere to the safety regulations.

In March, hospitals in the United Arab Emirates reported a spate of injuries from accidents involving electric scooters.

Doctors said broken bones, bruises and scratches from falling off the two-wheelers – some can travel at over 30 kilometers per hour – are now commonplace.

Dr. Taimoor Tung of Medcare Orthopedics and Spine Hospital in Dubai said medics have also seen head injuries as many drivers avoid helmets.

“They are mainly due to the driver’s fall, but there have been several cases of collisions with vehicles,” he said.

In October 2020, the government of Dubai approved the rental of e-scooters in five districts as part of a one-year trial to ensure their safe use.

E-scooter test in Dubai – in pictures

Users scan a QR code and enter their details into a phone app before using the e-scooter. Antonie Robertson / The National

A special lane in JLT. Antonie Robertson / The National

Commuters leaving the subway station can rent an electric scooter via a mobile app. Antonie Robertson / The National

Unlocking the scooter costs only Dh3 and then 50 fils per minute. Antonie Robertson / The National

A year-long trial with electric scooters was conducted in five districts of the city. Antonie Robertson / The National

UK resident April Kearns says she will use the new electric scooters to commute to her office in Jumeirah Lakes Towers. Antonie Robertson / The National

The e-scooters were introduced as part of a pilot project by the Roads and Transport Authority in cooperation with the Dubai Police. Antonie Robertson / The National

Anyone wishing to use the scooters must adhere to a number of rules, including wearing a helmet. Antonie Robertson / The National

Skurtt e-scooters for rent outside the Al Sufouh tram stop in the Knowledge Village. Antonie Robertson / The National

Traffic officials and police said drivers will be stopped and possibly fined if seen outside of the designated zones. Antonie Robertson / The National

When renting the e-scooter, drivers must adhere to a number of safety rules. Antonie Robertson / The National

The test areas were selected based on their population density, private developments, availability of public transport services, integrated infrastructure and high traffic safety data. Antonie Robertson / The National

The electric scooters reach speeds of up to 20 km / h. Antonie Robertson / The National

E-scooter rental has been banned across the city since the beginning of 2019 due to concerns about irresponsible use.

The use of private e-scooters is permitted.

Last year authorities limited the use of bicycles and e-scooters to 12 km / h on the Marina Walk, but drivers are often snaked around pedestrians at much higher speeds.

E-scooter rental can be legally used in Dubai on Mohammed bin Rashid Boulevard; Dubai Internet City; 2nd of December Street, Al Rigga and Jumeirah Lakes Towers, as part of the pilot.

Owners can be stopped by the police if they are found outside the five test zones.

Abu Dhabi has allowed their use on Corniche and Khalifa Street since October 2020 after a successful attempt in 2019.

The post Boy in e-scooter collision with automotive in Khor Fakkan. critically injured first appeared on DAILY GADGET AND GIZMOS NEWS.

Category: Scooters And One Wheels
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Toll from political push at UNC continues to mount
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 03:21:22 GMT
Toll from political push at UNC continues to mount

Prof. Malinda Maynor Lowery

In an exclusive interview, a distinguished Lumbee historian explains her decision to leave UNC-Chapel Hill

When renowned historian Malinda Maynor Lowery heard acclaimed journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones couldn’t get a vote on tenure from the UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees, she felt sad and angry. But she was no longer surprised.

A Lumbee tribal member and director of the school’s Center for the Study of the American South, Lowery said she had for years watched weak leadership and the politicization of the university harm the school’s reputation and demoralize its students and faculty of color.

By the time the school’s failure to grant tenure to Hannah-Jones was generating international headlines, Lowery had already made her decision. She was leaving UNC-Chapel Hill for Emory University in Atlanta.

“If someone is as accomplished as her and so deserving of tenure, especially compared to the comparative mediocrity of what’s gone before, and they won’t recognize that…I just had to weep,” Lowery said. “I actually cried over the depth of the injustice and the wound that our decision makers were aggravating with that decision.”

It wasn’t an easy decision, Lowery said. She has deep connections to North Carolina and to Chapel Hill, from which she earned her master’s and doctorate degrees. But like much of the faculty, she said, she has seen a glaring pattern in the school’s decision-making.

An illegal, backroom deal with the Sons of Confederate Veterans over the Silent Sam Confederate monument. The disastrous decision to bring students back to full capacity dorms in the middle of the COVID-19 pandemic against the advice of the Orange County Health Department. Private communications with wealthy, conservative donors over the hiring of Hannah-Jones and the decision to avoid a vote on the tenure bestowed on her white predecessors.

The pattern in these actions: leadership that prized the political concerns of the conservative dominated UNC Board of Governors, political appointees of the North Carolina General Assembly’s GOP majority, above all else.

These decisions have risked the health and safety of students and faculty, Lowery said, harmed their trust in the university and cost the campus millions in lost court battles and grants pulled by funding partners who say the school is betraying its own declared values.

“There’s just a variety of things that, in this pattern, are going to ensue,” Lowery said. “It’s totally predictable and entirely avoidable. But they continue to ignore the expertise of the people around them in order to uphold the decision making of people who have no expertise.”

With the Hannah-Jones decision, which looks headed for a federal discrimination lawsuit, Lowery said the school now appears to be wavering on the core principle of academic freedom in the face of political concerns.

“I don’t have the bandwidth to spend the next 15 years of my career stressing over whether my campus leaders support academic freedom and the tenure that accompanies that,” Lowery said. “We absolutely depend on it to teach our classes. We absolutely depend on it to produce knowledge that benefits society. If UNC-Chapel Hill is not going to support it, then the reputation of UNC-Chapel Hill is going to decline.”

“Toxic positivity”

There were many factors in Lowery’s decision to leave.

The school’s disinvestment in Indigenous studies. Its refusal to offer competitive salaries to get the best scholars in their fields. A “do more with less” ethos Lowery said has been obvious since 2010, the year Republicans took control of state government.

“Still, I felt like I could accommodate all of that as long as university leadership was not also doing other, harmful things,” Lowery said.

But it became obvious that it was, and would continue to, Lowery said.

The school’s refusal to act around the overwhelming sentiment from its students and faculty that the Silent Sam Confederate monument should be removed from campus was bewildering and hurtful, Lowery said. When protesters actually pulled the statue down in 2018, she noted, members of the UNC Board of Governors called for it to be re-erected. The school’s leadership, from the chancellor to the school’s Board of Trustees, was slow to “take sides” on the matter just as they were on the importance of renaming buildings on campus that honored Ku Klux Klan leaders, enslavers and avowed racists.

“These are symbols not just of a racist past but a refusal to now adopt a way of life where we are responsible to each other,” Lowery said.

As a director of a center at UNC, Lowery said, she knows what it is like to be in difficult political positions and to make hard decisions that won’t make everyone happy.

“But when you make a decision, like the settlement with the Sons of Confederate Veterans, that does actual harm, you have to apologize,” Lowery said. “Even if you can’t prevent the harm or it was out of your hands – though, of course, now we know that administrators were directly involved – you owe an apology. And nobody did that. Not only was it not explained in a transparent manner, but nobody said, ‘I am sorry for the hurt this caused.’”

Instead, Lowery said, school leadership leaned on a brand of “toxic positivity”: asking students and faculty to concentrate on the removal of the statue from campus, but not the compromises with white nationalist groups by which the school attempted to make that happen.

It didn’t just insult students and faculty, particularly those of color. It also compromised the school’s relationship with the Mellon Foundation, which pulled a $1.5 million grant to the school over a legal settlement with the Sons of Confederate Veterans that was later legally invalidated by an Orange County Superior Court judge, anyway.

“For people in the qualitative social sciences and humanities, there are not that many big funders that we can turn to to develop innovative ideas,” Lowery said. “It’s not just the decision but the lack of action over the impact of the decision.”

There is a direct line between that failure of leadership and its consequences and the decision to leave UNC-Chapel Hill for Emory University, Lowery said.

“I can go to Emory and apply for Mellon funds,” Lowery said. “I can’t do that at UNC.”

That same “toxic positivity” was on display last summer, Lowery said, as the school struggled with whether to hold classes in person or remotely. The debate over COVID-19 was already highly politicized, and the UNC system’s board of governors was warning of heavy revenue losses and deep financial cuts to schools that went remote.

One of Lowery’s uncles died of  COVID just as it became apparent that school leadership — including the board of governors and campus chancellor Kevin Guskiewicz — was going to ignore the sentiments of the faculty, student groups and the Orange County Health Department in order to return students to full-capacity dorms. Guskiewicz and UNC-Chapel Hill Provost Bob Blouin went on television to preach positivity and assure people that the school could safely make the move back to on-campus living and instruction.

Within a week, however, clusters of infections overwhelmed the campus. The plan to return had to be abandoned at Chapel-Hill and most of the largest campuses in the UNC System.

Again, no one apologized, Lowery said. In fact, Blouin told faculty he didn’t intend to “apologize for trying.”

“That’s when I knew I had to begin looking for other opportunities,” Lowery said.

It was a moment that epitomized the dominance of politics over reason, Lowery said — and showed just how little faculty expertise was valued.

“Not valuing the faculty’s expertise around some of these core questions was a mistake,” Lowery said. “We talked passionately about the ethics of this — people in public health, in the humanities, in the colleges of arts and sciences. And none of that expertise was tapped. It was communicated around and dismissed in public forums.”

With the controversy over Nikole Hannah-Jones’s tenure, Lowery said, it’s happening again.

“We are not being told what happened here, we’re not being told what is happening now,” Lowery said. “And we have faculty at our school, at schools around the country, telling the leadership what a mistake this was and how it should be handled. And again, that expertise is not being valued.”

As Policy Watch has reported, the costs are already apparent.

Lisa Jones, an associate professor of pharmaceutical sciences at the University of Maryland at Baltimore that the UNC Chapel Hill chemistry department had been aggressively recruiting, decided against coming to the school earlier this month. In a letter to the school Jones, who is Black, called the treatment of Hannah-Jones “very disheartening.”

“It does not seem in line with a school that says it is interested in diversity,” Jones wrote to the school. “Although I know this decision may not reflect the view of the school’s faculty, I will say that I cannot see myself accepting a position at a university where this decision stands. I appreciate all of the effort you have put into trying to recruit me but for me this is hard to overlook.”

Lowery said she could sympathize.

“Of course there is a cost to the harm to the school’s reputation from all of this and we’re seeing it,” Lowery said.

With Lowery’s exit, UNC’s loss is Emory’s gain. It’s not a decision she would have made years ago,  Lowery said, but it’s apparent UNC is becoming a different university.

“I don’t want to be at that university,” Lowery said. “I’m not going to stay there.”



originally published at http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ncpolicywatch.com%2F2021%2F06%2F14%2Ftoll-from-political-push-at-unc-continues-to-mount%2F by Joe Killian

The post Toll from political push at UNC continues to mount first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

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Just how do those mRNA vaccines work, anyway?
Tue, 18 May 2021 23:08:07 GMT

The COVID vaccines produced by Pfizer and Moderna, respectively, represent a new peak in human vaccine development technology. Their speedy deployment has given rise to both conspiracy theories and for some, a reluctance to get the vaccine. In reality, the technology has been around for a couple decades and under continuous development.

Dr. Rhonda Patrick recently sent a email with some of the best explanations to date:

Last fall, less than a year after the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19) first emerged, two new vaccines – from Pfizer and Moderna – received emergency use authorization for distribution in the US. Both vaccines rely on a recent (and really exciting) innovation in vaccine technology: exploitation of messenger RNA, or mRNA. (A third vaccine, from Johnson & Johnson, uses viral vector technology, but I really want to focus on the mRNA technology because 1) it’s so cool, and 2) it opens the door to developing vaccines for many other diseases!)

Science is moving fast and the mRNA vaccine technology is now likely going to be used for the seasonal flu vaccines, malaria vaccines, and most exciting, cancer vaccines!

mRNA is a single-stranded molecule that mirrors the sequence of one half of a DNA strand. It plays vital roles in human biology because it facilitates protein synthesis, serving as a delivery mechanism for the genetic instructions carried in DNA.

mRNA-based vaccines contain the genetic instructions for synthesis of a single viral protein that, when injected into the body, stimulates the immune system to make antibodies against a specific target. In this case, the target is a spiky protein on the SARS-CoV-2 surface – aptly named a spike glycoprotein. The mRNA sequence (the genetic sequence) carried in the vaccines only encodes this protein.

mRNA is somewhat fragile, so virologists house it in lipid nanoparticles to protect it. These particles are injected into a person’s muscle, where they are taken up by muscle cells. The muscle cells then transcribe the mRNA to produce the spike glycoprotein, which stimulates an immune response, protecting the person from COVID-19 illness.

The new mRNA-based vaccine technology allows rapid scaling of vaccine production and facilitates modification if the virus mutates significantly. And because mRNA can’t enter a cell’s nucleus, concerns about its safety are low.

In fact, most reactions to the vaccines are considered mild or moderate in severity. Here’s what that means: data from one of the clinical trials showed that the most severe events after the first dose included injection site pain (2.7%) and after the second dose included fatigue (9.7%), muscle pain (8.9%), joint pain (5.2%), headache (4.5%), pain (4.1%) and redness at the injection site (2.0%). These events were typically short-lived. Most long-term effects manifest within two months of vaccination, and we’re well past that stage in terms of real-world application.

Since the mRNA vaccines’ release, roughly 155 million people living in the US have had at least one dose of a vaccine, the majority of which have been mRNA-based vaccines. Remarkable in scale, given the overall freshness of the technology. Yet the outcome has, by almost all accounts, been more positive than perhaps we would’ve dared to hope in earlier days.

Looking back over the past year or so, many reasonable people have observed that the acceleration of the COVID-19 vaccines, especially the mRNA-based ones, felt fast – at least on an emotional level. The good news is it really seems like the new COVID-19 vaccines are a tremendous success story. (Note: Although I have a background in cell biology, I’m not an epidemiologist or virologist, so I say this as a mostly casual observer to these technologies.)

Category: Science
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Crash “likely” due to storm, 10 dead in Alabama – Tampa, Florida,
Sun, 20 Jun 2021 17:29:59 GMT
Eminetra

Tampa, Florida 2021-06-20 11:54:01 –

Atlanta (AP) – Tropical cyclone Claudette claims a storm struck the southeastern United States, causing flash floods and tornadoes, destroying dozens of homes and killing 12 people in Alabama.

Coroner Weingerlock, Butler County, said two vehicles collided on Saturday, killing 10 people, including nine children.

Several people were injured. Meanwhile, a 24-year-old man and a 3-year-old boy were killed when a tree fell on their home outside the Tuscaloosa city limits on Saturday, Captain Martisellers of the Tuscaloosa Violent Crime Unit told Tuscaloosa News. ..

Rainfalls in northern Alabama and much of Georgia killed people. A tropical cyclone warning was issued in North Carolina on Sunday.

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Michiganders Prepare For Life After COVID Restrictions
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 07:17:07 GMT
Patch News

LANSING, MI – Tuesday couldn’t come soon enough for many Michiganers. That’s because Tuesday marks the end of most of Michigan’s COVID-19 restrictions, including a mandate for face-covering in many public spaces and capacity limits.

Governor Gretchen Whitmer’s office announced the changes Thursday, citing falling COVID-19 cases and increased vaccinations.

“Today is a day we all looked forward to as we can safely return to normal, day-to-day activities and leave this pandemic behind,” Whitmer said in a statement at the time of the announcement. “We owe great thanks to the medical experts and health professionals who have been at the forefront of our safety. And we are incredibly grateful to all the important workers who have kept our state moving. “

Related: MI Is About To End COVID Restrictions: Here Are 3 Things You Should Know

But what will life be like in Michigan after more than a year of various health restrictions? Well, for some who choose to continue wearing face covering, it might not look much different. But a certain stigma associated with wearing a mask worries them.

In recent interviews with people in downtown Royal Oak, WXYZ reported that some feel ashamed of others for choosing to wear their masks in some public places.

“There were many judgments, but we kept our masks on,” Aarti Panchal told the TV station.

The problem isn’t unique to Michigan either. A recent column by Darcel Rocket of the Chicago Tribune suggests that “maskenshaming” and the politicization of choosing to wear a mask after the official end of the mandate is rampant in Illinois and other states.

“For each of us there was a moment when we realized we were being overwhelmed by an exceptionally powerful force (the pandemic) that we could not control,” Laurie Zoloth, bioethicist at the University of Chicago, said in an interview with the piece. “People reacted to this in two very different ways. Some people wore a mask and said, I take this seriously, I am in reality and I am careful. They have a story that involves a scientific understanding of what was going on goes.

“And for others, the mask was used to remind them of a painful truth that they would rather deny,” Zoloth continued in the article. “It is very destabilizing for these people to see someone wearing a mask because someone here is wearing the visible mark of disaster, and they do not want to be reminded of this tragic reality.”

Michigan Board of Canvassers to certify the clearance of Michigan petitions on Wednesday

The Michigan Board of State Canvassers is expected to confirm petitions collected Wednesday morning by the conservative group Unlock Michigan.

Recently, the Michigan Supreme Court ruled that the state’s electoral committee has a duty to uphold the group’s petition to repeal a 1945 law introduced by Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer in issuing public health orders during the Coronavirus pandemic was cited.

Last year, Unlock Michigan was able to garner enough voter signatures to repeal a 75-year-old bill cited by the Whitmer administration when it issued executive orders during the coronavirus pandemic. The law was later declared unconstitutional.

Related: Conservative Group Petition Targets MI Public Health Orders

The meeting is scheduled for Wednesday at 9 a.m.

Weather for the coming week

After strong storms hit southeast Michigan on Sunday night, more storms could be okay for parts of the region earlier this week. Here is the upcoming forecast as provided by the National Weather Service in Detroit.

Monday: High of 77, low of 49. Thunderstorms during the day and mostly cloudy at night. Tuesday: High of 71, low of 52. Sunny during the day, mostly clear at night. Wednesday: High value 77, low value 62. Mostly sunny during the day, partly cloudy at night. Thursday: High of 86. Mostly sunny.

The post Michiganders Prepare For Life After COVID Restrictions first appeared on Wolverine State Watch.

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Father’s Day is the best time for this Ann Arbor rose backyard, which has been in bloom for 55 years
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 03:05:56 GMT
Father's Day is the best time for this Ann Arbor rose garden, which has been in bloom for 55 years

ANN ARBOR, MI – George Hewens wants you to stop and smell the roses.

Hewens, 94, has been tending his rose garden since he moved to his home in Ann Arbor 55 years ago. Starting with just a handful of rose bushes, Hewens now takes care of a rose garden, which he estimates to have around 400 flowers.

“It’s American. It’s the national flower, ”said Hewens. “They are amazing plants that you can watch as they develop. The colors are likely to affect some people. The smells alone are interesting. “

Hewens, father of four daughters, married his wife Nancy, who died in 2016, in 1953. He was a member of the Huron Valley Rose Society.

“There was rose fever in the 60s and 70s,” said Hewens.

One of the Huron Valley Rose Society’s most popular events was the Rose Show, which was filled “from elbow to elbow” each year around Father’s Day, Hewens said.

“It was the thing to do on Father’s Day,” said Hewens. “We didn’t need a traffic cop, but it was a steady flow all day.”

Though some competitors brush and nudge their flowers – plucking petals and washing leaves with milk to make them glow – Hewens said he prefers a natural look.

“I always believed I would go out the night before the show or the morning of the show,” said Hewens. “Maybe pick up the insects.”

Hewens is vague about the number of awards his flowers have received, but said he “got my share”. He said medical professionals, who made up a notable part of the Rose Society, are the most competitive.

“They worked all day cutting open people’s livers and they sat quietly growing their five or six roses,” Hewens said. “You would do anything to get a blue ribbon.”

For Hewens, growing roses is a delicate art, but it’s vastly simplified by defeating the rose’s deadliest enemies: red spider mites and black spot. Once a gardener has full sun and fertile soil, growing roses requires minimal maintenance, he said.

Gardening was also a family activity. Hewens’ daughters would attend non-member Rose Society classes and would continue to garden themselves.

“Gardening seems to run in our blood,” says Janice Flinn, the eldest of the daughters.

Flinn said her father prefers his rose garden “above all and everyone else” and often gives away flowers.

“It’s like any other child, the way he takes care of it,” said Flinn.

Flinn also grows roses.

Public appreciation of roses has waned since their heyday, Hewens said, which he attributes to the rise of technology.

“It has been going downhill since then. People just don’t have the time to engage in outdoor activities like gardening, ”said Hewens. “But I’m hardcore.”

In addition to roses, Hewens also grows hydrangeas and lavender.

Hewens, who has dealt with health problems as he ages, said that cultivating a garden helps people distract themselves from the worries of life and also “adds a little bit of color here and there.”

“It will add a dimension of joy to your life that you might not otherwise experience,” said Hewens.

More from the Ann Arbor News:

A cake from a canceled wedding turns into cupcake treats at Mott Children’s Hospital

Ann Arbor Veterans Medical Center renamed Ypsilanti Medal of Honor Recipient

Local Food: Ann Arbor’s Sottini’s Sub Shop revealed during COVID. three new sandwiches

Group that manages Arbor Hills outdoor mall files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy

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Wander Franco is set to make a splash at the Tampa Bay Rays
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 03:32:26 GMT
Wander Franco is set to make a splash at the Tampa Bay Rays

10:46 p.m. ET

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The Tampa Bay Rays have named shortstop Wander Franco, 20, as number one in baseball, and he is likely to make his big-league debut at home against the Boston Red Sox this week.

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The post Wander Franco is set to make a splash at the Tampa Bay Rays first appeared on Daily Florida Press.

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Boulder voters will be asked in November if the city’s occupancy limit should be increased
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 04:57:23 GMT
Boulder voters will be asked in November if the city's occupancy limit should be increased

SHORT

A “For Rent” sign in front of a small apartment building in Denver on July 14, 2020. (Moe Clark / Colorado Newsline)

A citizen-led initiative in Boulder that aims to increase the number of people allowed to live under one roof has received the necessary signatures to appear on the November 2021 vote.

Bedrooms are for people a grassroots campaign led by residents of Boulder, requested the 3,500+ digital signatures required to legally qualify for the citizenship election. The campaign is the first in the country to be approved through an online petition system, according to its press release.

The group received over 5,000 signatures on paper petitions in 2020, but was deemed ineligible for the 2020 vote after receiving inaccurate information from Boulder’s city attorney.

“Sometimes when our representatives don’t have the political will to do the right thing, progress has to be people-led,” said Chelsea Castellano, who helped lead the citizen-led effort.

Current law prohibits more than three independent people do not live together in most houses across town, no matter how many rooms there are in the house. The exclusive zoning policy has resulted in residents who attempt to live within their means by sharing an apartment with several roommates being forced out of their home.

The proposed Bedrooms are act for people would change what advocates of fair living consider “archaic and discriminatory laws” by equating the number of people living in the home to the number of bedrooms plus one extra person.

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Supreme Court Weighs Voting Rights in Ruling Arizona – thecherrycreeknews.com
Sun, 20 Jun 2021 07:28:33 GMT
A little white post office that appears to be boarded up;  a cactus stands in front of it

The Maricopa County Department of Elections will count the ballots in Phoenix on November 5, 2020. Arizona’s electoral laws are the subject of a pending Supreme Court ruling. Olivier Touron / AFP via Getty Images

Would you vote by postal vote if you had to spend hours driving to a post office to mail your ballot? This is the question the United States Supreme Court is dealing with at this session in Brnovich against the Democratic National Committee, which analysts see as one of the most important electoral law cases in a decade.

The case deals with two Arizona laws that place restrictions on how and when Arizona citizens can vote.

A state law passed in 2016, HB 2023, makes it a crime for anyone except family members, carers or postal workers to collect and deliver ballot papers. The second Arizona law in question requires that ballots be cast in the assigned district where a voter lives. If a voter casts a preliminary ballot at the wrong polling station, it will be rejected by the polling officers.

Brnovich v. Democratic National Committee is asking the court to determine whether the two rules of Arizona disproportionately violate minority voters.

But the judgment of the court will have national ramifications. Since the 2020 presidential election, legislators in 47 states have introduced 361 so-called “electoral integrity laws”, which newly restrict the right to vote.

Our research on elections shows that these types of restrictive laws significantly affect the right to vote, especially among ethnic minorities and the poor.

The Supreme Court decision could determine the fate of many of these laws.

From Arizona to the Supreme Court

In Arizona, nearly 80% of voters cast their votes by mail in 2018. However, in rural areas of the state, where many Hispanic and Native American people live, the postal service is not always available. For example, only 18% of Native Americans in the state have access to home mail delivery.

The Tohono O’odham reservation, which covers an area larger than Rhode Island and Delaware, has no home delivery and only has a post office. These rural voters often rely on friends or poll workers to get their ballots into the polling stations.

The burdens on rural and tribal voters were cited in a 2016 Democratic National Committee lawsuit to block the Arizona ballot collection ban and the restriction on voting outside the county. The Democratic National Committee alleged that both policies violated Section 2 of the Federal Suffrage Act, which prohibits practices that “result in denial or restriction of the right to vote based on race or color.”

Post offices are few and far between in rural Arizona.
Joe Sohm / Visions of America / Universal Images Group via Getty Images

The lawsuit, backed by Arizona’s Democratic Foreign Minister, also argued that the ballot collection ban was deliberately targeted at minorities. That would violate the 15th Amendment to the US Constitution, which prohibits states from deliberately refusing to vote on grounds of race.

The Arizona Republican Attorney General and the state’s Republican Party argued that the laws were race-neutral restrictions that did not hinder equal opportunities for Arizonans in voting and were enacted to protect the integrity of the elections.

The Arizona District Court and two separate three-member chambers of the US Court of Appeals for the Ninth District originally ruled in favor of Arizona. But after the entire ninth district court met for a so-called “en banc” session, these decisions were reversed.

The entire Ninth District said the Arizona ballot collection ban violates Section 2 of the Suffrage Act and the 15th Amendment, as minority voters are more likely to rely on others than non-minorities to return their ballots. And the law could not be credibly defended as an electoral integrity measure as the judges saw no evidence that third party ballot confiscation had in the past resulted in electoral fraud.

The appeals court also found that the politics outside the district violated Section 2 of the Voting Rights Act. Arizona officials frequently switched polling stations in urban counties with large minorities, making it easy for voters to make mistakes. In 2016, 3,709 ballots outside the Arizona county were rejected, and minority voters were twice as likely to have their ballots rejected in the process than whites.

The court put its decision on hold pending appeal by Arizona to the Supreme Court and left both directives in effect for the time being.

Election sequences

Arizona is one of 14 states that restrict third party ballot collection. District voting is required in 26 states. Nationwide, around 140,000 preliminary ballot papers were invalidated as being outside the electoral district in the 2018 mid-term elections. This happens even when the location of the district is not relevant, for example in the case of governor or president elections.

If the Supreme Court rules in favor of the Democratic National Committee, Arizona’s controversial laws and many others like them will be invalidated. If Arizona prevails, states will have more leeway in introducing restrictive electoral practices.

Prior to 2013, states with a history of discrimination required federal approval before they could enact new electoral laws under Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act. But in 2013 the Shelby County Supreme Court against Holder – a Tennessee proxy case – abolished these pre-litigation procedures.

As a preclearance state, Arizona was previously prevented by the federal government from enacting election restrictions like HB 2023. Other former preclearance states that have enacted restrictive laws since 2013 include North Carolina, Texas, and Florida.

Since Shelby County v. Holder, proxies must rely on another section of the Voting Act – Section 2 – to legally challenge these restrictive voting laws.

Brnovich v DNC is the first time the Supreme Court has examined this strategy.

As the court judges

During the hearing in March, several Conservative Supreme Court justices, including Chief Justice John Roberts, raised questions that favorably addressed Arizona’s concerns about the integrity of the elections.

But the judges seemed divided over the legal standard for evaluating Section 2 claims.

Supreme Court, with a man waking his dogs in front of itThe Supreme Court is expected to rule on the Arizona proxy case shortly.
Drew Angerer / Getty Images

In the 2020 decision against Arizona, the Ninth Circuit used a “score test”. This means that a law does not require proof of intention to discriminate in order to prevent. Judges only ask whether the law disproportionately affects historically disadvantaged groups.

Judge Samuel Alito feared the results test was too broad. Poor, less educated voters, Alito said in oral proceedings, would “find it harder to comply with almost every electoral rule”. Alito suggested just asking whether politicians are denying voters an “equal chance” to vote.

Liberal Judge Stephen Breyer suggested that the court should consider the varying implications for minority voting, but also allow states to defend their policies on grounds other than race.

Judge Brett Kavanaugh suggested a middle ground. His test would check whether minorities have the same “opportunities” to vote, but also other considerations, such as whether other states apply the same rule and whether there are race-neutral reasons for doing so.

Whichever approach the court takes will lay the groundwork for future litigation and the bigger showdown between state suffrage and state control of elections.

[Understand key political developments, each week. Subscribe to The Conversation’s politics newsletter.]

The conversation

The authors do not work for, consult, own, hold, or fund any companies or organizations that would benefit from this article, and have not disclosed any relevant connections beyond their academic appointment.

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Western History and Genealogy Blogs: Personnel Favorites from 2020
Tue, 29 Dec 2020 09:29:58 GMT

Two soldiers reading magazines

Between a global pandemic, social justice movements, a tense election, and more, 2020 has been a year for the history books. It forced us to rethink our work and home lives, how we interact with each other, and how we use the past to inform our world today. Through it all, WHG staff wrote blogs that touched on the world we currently live in, sometimes addressing 2020 themes directly, and at other times simply bearing it in our writer’s voice. Here are our favorite Western History and Genealogy blog posts from 2020. Enjoy!

View of 1720 Julian Street on June 3, 2020. Photo by Katie Rudolph

Obituary for a Denver House

Working from home gave Archivist Katie a front-row seat to the demolition of a century-old Denver home. The razing of a historic Denver home was nothing new, but Katie’s “obituary” was unique. Using WHG resources throughout, she offered a beautiful tribute to this piece of Denver’s history that hits a little closer to home.

Policarpio Córdova family

Dos Apellidos: When Families Have Two Surnames 

“Genealogy” is in our department’s name, after all, but our closure to the public and limited access for staff have made family history research a little bit trickier this year. While it was front of mind, we offered several posts on genealogy research from home. Our favorite was Librarian Nicolás’s easy-to-follow guide on Spanish naming conventions that reminds us reminds us that every culture varies in naming practices – and how we can use that to our advantage.

Tranquil Moment at Fairmount. Photo courtesy Laura Ruttum Senturia

Fairmount Cemetery as an Outdoor Refuge

As we clung to our sanity amidst social distancing and constant uncertainty, during a time we were instructed to stay close to home, we found ourselves turning to old and new methods to get outdoors. History nerds have a special fondness for old cemeteries, but as Archivist Laura found out, Denver’s 130-year-old Fairmount Cemetery also proved an ideal pandemic excursion spot.

The Headline that launched a thousand blogs. Well, one, anyway. Rocky Mountain News – October 6, 1967

UFOs and a Horse Called Snippy and Livestock and the Beginnings of the Satanic Panic

This two-parter from Library Assistant Chris provided some much-needed escapism in October. From extraterrestrials to home-grown Satan worshippers, Chris delivered the history of livestock mutilation with wry humor and some much-needed perspective.

Scene of Green's execution

Andrew Green, James Whitnah, and Denver’s Last Public Execution

As long-festering wounds in our city and country came to a head this summer, we found ourselves contemplating Denver’s historic concepts of justice. Librarian Brian came across a mention of Denver’s last public execution in our Colorado Chronology and was inspired to write a post about this complex case and the early history of race and punishment in Denver.

Luisa Vigil, Cesar Chavez, Magdalena Gallegos Photo courtesy of Francis Torres. Photo credit James Baca.

César Chávez Day

For this one, we go back to March and the early days of the Denver Public Library’s pandemic response, but this post has nothing to do with that. Instead, this was an opportunity for us to collaborate with an eyewitness to history. Guest blogger Magdalena Gallegos shared her own experiences working with César Chávez and the United Farm Workers. Little did we know when we posted her blog that we would have the opportunity to write our own eyewitness accounts of the historic year ahead of us.

Dwight, Ed (1st black selected astronaut – sculptor)

Denver’s Historic African American Community in Photographs

In this unusual year that had so many of our staff working from home, we were able to host and mentor a couple of library school interns. Our intern Laurier wrote a blog post that is just so good we had to include it in the year’s favorites! Through her work in our Burnis McCloud collection, Laurier discovered a local Denverite who was the first African American selected for NASA’s astronaut training program. Her post inspires us to tap into our bravery and use the collections to grow ourselves and our community. We thank Laurier for this important reminder and this engaging post! 

Did your favorite 2020 blog make the list? Let us know in the comments below!

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Mobile “Vaxi Taxi” offers COVID-19 images in Wyoming
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 02:19:46 GMT
Mobile "Vaxi Taxi" offers COVID-19 images in Wyoming

Jhala French packs up the Teton County Health Department’s Vaxi taxi after its stop at Jackson Hole Airport on Monday afternoon. The mobile vaccination team stopped in Kelly, Moran and Moose that day and spent Tuesday in Wilson and Alta. The pop-up clinic will make two stops on Wednesday, first at Hoback Market from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. and then at The Bird from 12 p.m. to 1 p.m. | Ryan Dorgan, Jackson Hole News & Guide

JACKSON, Wyoming (AP) – With 80% of adults over 18 in Teton County fully vaccinated, vaccinated people now make up the majority of the community. Health authorities are now launching an innovative vaccination campaign to further increase community protection against COVID-19.

“The whole goal is to try to reach people, to make it easier for people,” said Rachael Wheeler, Public Health Response Coordinator.

The Ministry of Health’s new “Vaxi Taxi”, a repurposed START bus that has been converted into a mobile vaccine clinic, aims to improve access to COVID-19 vaccines by reaching remote populations who are unable to inject at the city health department.

“It’s very convenient for us to have a more mobile unit that we can easily stand in,” said Wheeler.

Nurses check in patients under a tent outside the bus and question patients about possible COVID-19 symptoms or recent contact with infected people. Nurses also patiently describe side effects that might occur after vaccination, usually a sore arm and mild fever, reports the Jackson Hole News & Guide.

Patients then head into the Vaxi taxi, where they receive their shots in the seats that passengers normally use for transportation. The Vaxi-Taxi has two tables that are easy to assemble and disassemble, seats for vaccine recipients, medical forms and equipment for vaccine distribution, and a team of friendly professionals waiting to administer the vaccines.

Outside there are chairs under a tent so that the recipients can rest in the shade while waiting after the recordings.

The health department has used mobile clinics in the past to support the public with flu vaccines. Usually their mobile clinics only transport supplies to vaccination sites like the Jackson Hole Senior Center.

Operation with the Vaxi-Taxi enables the team to hold clinics in more locations in the valley, as well as more efficient facilities and easy cleaning.

Bryce Villalobos, a station agent at Jackson Hole Airport, picked up his vaccine in a Vaxi taxi in the Jackson Airport parking lot on Monday evening. His chance at work was bittersweet as the first COVID-19 death in Teton County was Bill Sweney, an airport worker with whom Villalobos had worked personally.

Some members of the community, like Villalobos, may find it more difficult to schedule vaccination appointments due to lack of transportation or scheduling conflicts that prevent them from visiting the Department of Health clinic while it is open. By offering additional options and websites for vaccinations, the Vaxi-Taxi removes these supply barriers.

“I worked 12 to 13 hour days, I didn’t have time to make an appointment,” said Villalobos.

Appointments are not required for the Vaxi-Taxi, so everyone is welcome to show up at any stop on the route. You can find detailed timetable information at TetonCountyWY.gov/vaxitaxi.

The mobile clinic offers both the Moderna and Johnson & Johnson vaccines. The Moderna vaccine consists of two doses, while the Johnson & Johnson vaccine is only one. Both are available to people aged 18 and over.

Anyone under the age of 18 needs the Pfizer shot, which is only available from the health department, as it needs to be stored refrigerated.

The Vaxi-Taxi also works directly with employers and encourages employers who are interested to coordinate with the health department to get the Vaxi-Taxi to their business.

“Some companies have already reached out to us specifically so we are reaching out and will continue to reach out to different companies to see where the demand is,” said Wheeler.

On Wednesday the Vaxi Taxi drove south with stops at Hoback Market and The Bird.

“Increasing equity and access is important for public health,” said Wheeler. “We have the feeling that the Vaxi-Taxi does exactly that.”

The post Mobile "Vaxi Taxi" offers COVID-19 images in Wyoming first appeared on Daily Wyoming Cowboy.

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Senior US Well being Official Xavier Becerra visits Colorado to advertise vaccines
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 00:30:34 GMT
Senior US Health Official Xavier Becerra visits Colorado to promote vaccines

DENVER – U.S. Health Secretary Xavier Becerra visited a mobile vaccine clinic near Denver on Friday to promote COVID-19 vaccinations among underserved color communities that have some of the lowest vaccination rates in the country.

He also met with Democratic Governor Jared Polis, who was briefly interrupted by the governor’s dog, Gia, and another dog who stormed through their closed session and made the two of them laugh. They discussed the state’s pandemic response and a new law to create a state-administered health insurance plan designed to reduce premiums and care costs and protect more people.

Later, Becerra, the agency’s first Latino leader, and Democratic members of the Colorado Congressional Delegation toured a mobile vaccine clinic that focuses on underserved communities in the Denver suburb of Aurora, which is nearly 30% Hispanic. It is one of nine mobile units made from converted buses.

While Hispanic people make up 20% of Colorado’s population, less than 10% have been vaccinated, according to the state’s vaccine dashboard. In the United States, the lack of access to vaccines and distrust of the medical field within minority communities has made it difficult to vaccinate these populations.

Democratic MP Jason Crow, whose district is Aurora, said many minorities and immigrants struggle to find the time to get a vaccination while they have multiple jobs, highlighting the need for the state’s mobile resources.

“Where you are, we go. Where you are we will go, ”said Becerra.

He asked Latino communities to identify trustworthy leaders who act as “ambassadors” for vaccines to convince those who still hesitate. He reminded the public that the vaccine is free and noted that some may not believe that there are no “gimmicks” associated with getting the vaccination.

However, recent data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that Latinos have received a higher proportion of vaccine doses in the past two weeks, reducing inequality, the Department of Health said.

Becerra also met with faculty and students at the Metropolitan State University of Denver to learn about the implications of his agency’s scholarship for educating people in behavioral medicine.

Becerra said the US is “so far behind” on behavioral health services, but the pandemic has opened the door for the federal government to invest in mental health and substance abuse.

“I think that taboo aspect of talking about it has to some extent dissolved,” Becerra told The Associated Press. “I think COVID has really forced people to realize that there are people who are really suffering from stress and beyond.”

The secretary’s visit included a discussion of the impact of President Joe Biden’s American family plan on communities of color. The $ 1.8 trillion program increases spending on early and secondary education, childcare, and paid family and sick leave.

Becerra spoke to Deidre Johnson, CEO and Executive Director of the Denver-based Center for African American Health, which focuses on black health disparities, about the plan’s improved access to the plan’s child tax credits. Approximately 90% of eligible families are automatically enrolled, but the administration is working with community leaders like Johnson to increase attendance.

Qualified families receive up to $ 300 per month for each child under 6 years of age and up to $ 250 per month for children 6-17 years of age. The credit was previously capped at $ 2,000 and was only paid to income tax families after filing with the IRS.

Becerra said his visit to Colorado showed the Biden government’s interest in partnering with states “where innovation and change can be seen” to reduce healthcare costs and improve access to affordable prescription drugs – actions lawmakers are pushing passed this year.

Nieberg is a corps member of the Associated Press / Report for America Statehouse News Initiative. Report for America is a not-for-profit national utility that places journalists on local newsrooms to cover undercover issues.

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CAROLINE BANCROFT HISTORY REWARD COMMITTEE NAMES 2020 WINNER
Tue, 16 Mar 2021 11:19:47 GMT
Barrio America: How Latino Immigrants Saved the American City by A. K. Sandoval-Strausz

Barrio America: How Latino Immigrants Saved the American City

Denver Public Library’s Western History and Genealogy department is pleased to announce the 2020 Caroline Bancroft History Prize winner. The Bancroft Committee has selected A. K. Sandoval-Strausz’s Barrio America: How Latino Immigrants Saved the American City (Basic Books) as the winner of the 2020 Prize.​

Barrio America tells the compelling history of how Latino immigrants revitalized the nation’s cities after decades of disinvestment and white flight began in the 1960s. Thirty years ago, most people were ready to give up on American cities. It is commonly said that in the 1990s and 2000s a “creative class” of young professionals were responsible for reviving a moribund urban America. But this stunning reversal owes much more to another, far less visible group: Latinos and Latinas, both native-born and newcomers.

Award-winning historian and Associate Professor of History at Penn State, A. K. Sandoval-Strausz reveals this history by focusing on two barrios: Chicago’s Little Village and Dallas’s Oak Cliff. These neighborhoods had been losing residents and jobs for decades when Latin American immigration turned them around, beginning in the 1970s. As Sandoval-Strausz shows, Latinos made cities dynamic, stable, and safe by purchasing homes, opening businesses, and reviving street life. Barrio America uses vivid oral histories and detailed statistics to show how the great Latino migrations transformed America for the better.

Caroline Bancroft (1900-1985)

Caroline Bancroft (1900-1985)

According to the terms of the will of the late Caroline Bancroft, a provision is made for an annual prize “to be awarded to the author of the best book on Colorado or Western American History.” The prize serves to recognize books that make a significant contribution to historical knowledge, present thorough and original research, bring a new perspective to some well-known question, and are of a high literary quality. 

Congratulations to Professor Sandoval-Strausz!

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Raleigh, NC – Car crash causes injuries on I-440 WB on Glenwood Ave.
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 09:35:21 GMT
Raleigh, NC - Car crash causes injuries on I-440 WB on Glenwood Ave.

Raleigh, NC (June 20, 2021) – On Sunday evening, June 20, around 10:30 p.m., a rear-end collision occurred on a busy Raleigh motorway.

Raleigh Police Department officials reported that the accident occurred in the westbound lanes of Interstate 440 near the Glenwood Avenue exit. Police confirmed that a sedan hit another car, causing injuries and damage to both vehicles.

Paramedics, firefighters and numerous other emergency services were dispatched to the scene immediately, and 911 dispatchers said at least one victim was hospitalized for treatment for their injuries. Her current condition and the total number of injuries are unknown.

The carriageway in the area was closed for a long time while the police investigated on site.

No further details were released at this point.

Our thoughts go with the injured and their families in the hope of a full recovery.

North Carolina rear-end collisions

Rear-end collisions are among the most catastrophic accidents on our roads. If a driver follows a vehicle too closely or cannot stop in time because he is not paying attention to the road, an accident can occur in no time at all. Serious automobile accidents injure many drivers and passengers across the state of North Carolina each year. In fact, hundreds of thousands of victims will spend time in the hospital due to terrible but preventable car accidents. If you have been injured in a car accident and you are unsure of where to turn, you should contact an accident attorney.

Getting injured in a North Carolina car accident can affect your life in many ways. This is especially true if you’ve sustained serious injuries such as spinal cord injuries, TBI, fractures, organ damage, and more. If you suffer from these injuries, you can spend time in the hospital and outside of work while you work on your recovery. You may be wondering how you are going to be working on your physical recovery in addition to offsetting the bills that pile up. Fortunately, you have several options. Visit www.riccilawnc.com for our proven track record of representing injuries in car accidents.

Our attorneys at Ricci Law Firm, PA are dedicated to every aspect of a victim’s claims and will stop at nothing to ensure that those affected by these collisions receive justice. We’ll give you the resources you need to move forward and help you navigate the North Carolina legal system to give you the best chance of successful accidental claim and a fair, full settlement. Whether you’ve been injured in a serious car accident or lost a loved one to one of these wrecks, our lawyers are there for you in your need. If you have suffered from the negligence of another party, please contact a North Carolina accident attorney immediately at (252) 777-2222. Make an appointment for a free legal aid consultation today and find out how we can help you.

Remarks: Our writing team uses a variety of external and secondary sources to create these posts. These sources include news reports, police incident reports, social media platforms, state police news bulletins, and eyewitness reports covering the injuries related to accidents across North Carolina. As a result, the details of this accident have not been independently confirmed or verified. If you discover inaccurate information, please notify us as soon as possible so that we can correct the post to reflect the most accurate information available. If for any reason you would like the post removed, please let us know and we will remove the post as soon as possible.

Disclaimers: We have worked hard to become highly respected members of the North Carolina business community. The Ricci, PA law firm aims to create awareness of the dangers associated with driving and hopes that our North Carolinians will take all necessary steps to avoid becoming involved in a serious wreck. This news post is not intended as advertising for companies. The information in this article does not constitute legal or medical advice. The images used in this article were not taken at the scene of the accident.

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Ousted Space Force commander defended by Rep. Lamborn advanced white ‘genocide’ theory in book
Wed, 16 Jun 2021 16:08:04 GMT


Then-Capt. Matthew Lohmeier, pictured on July 22, 2015, as the 460th Operations Group Block 10 chief of training, stands in the Standardized Space Trainer on Buckley Air Force Base in Aurora. (Darren Scott/U.S. Air Force)

Lt. Col. Matthew Lohmeier was commander of the 11th Space Warning Squadron at Buckley Space Force Base in Aurora until last month, when he was relieved of command following public criticism of what he called the growing influence of “cultural Marxism” in the U.S. military. Now, his case is being reviewed by the Air Force inspector general, while Republican politicians, including Rep. Doug Lamborn of Colorado Springs, have rallied to his defense.

“He is an outstanding young man,” Lamborn, who said he’d met with Lohmeier last week, told conservative radio host Tony Perkins in a Thursday interview. “I think he’s the kind of person we want to keep in the military, and not drive out of the military.”

As first reported by Military.com, Lohmeier was removed from his post on May 14 “due to loss of trust and confidence in his ability to lead,” a Space Force spokesperson said, according to CNN.

“This decision was based on public comments made by Lt. Col. Lohmeier in a recent podcast,” the spokesperson said. Lohmeier appeared on a May 7 episode of the right-wing “Information Operation” podcast to promote his self-published book, “Irresistible Revolution: Marxism’s Goal of Conquest and the Unmaking of the American Military.”

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In his book, Lohmeier praises the Trump administration’s efforts to crack down on diversity training programs within the Department of Defense, and he denounces what he calls the department’s “current radical narrative about systemic racism in America.” Much of the book consists of unsubstantiated and anonymous anecdotes that Lohmeier says illustrate the “increasingly overt support for the progressive, Marxist worldview” within the armed forces. He criticizes efforts by the Biden administration to root out right-wing extremism in the military’s ranks and falsely claims that the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol was carried out “by a mixed group of Trump supporters and Antifa agent provocateurs.”

Lohmeier also embraces theories that are widely identified by anti-extremism researchers and advocacy groups as being characteristic of white-supremacist ideology. In the book’s final chapter, titled “The Wrath to Come,” Lohmeier warns of what he says are the inevitable consequences of “the rhetorical demonization of conservatives and whites in the country.”

“I had always intended the final chapter of this book to be a warning — a warning that ideas have consequences,” Lohmeier wrote. “A warning that postmodernist, neo-Marxist ideology employs vile rhetoric that stokes rage and leads people to do terrible things. This chapter is about fratricidal and genocidal warfare, and all of the horror that implies — because you cannot persist in the hate-filled demonization of entire groups of people based on their race or political affiliation without incurring the wrath of genocide. To persist means that it is not a question of whether it will turn into violence — that it will, follows like the night the day. Rather, the only question remaining is when.”

“To be perfectly clear, the path we are on as a country leads to fratricidal and genocidal warfare,” Lohmeier continues. “In disheartening irony, the politically correct, overly sensitive, racially charged, woke culture in which we live prevents peaceful citizens from properly publicly identifying real threats for what they are.”

The words “genocide” or “genocidal” are used in relation to these issues 17 times throughout Lohmeier’s book, which was published on May 10 and is currently ranked as the No. 1 bestseller in the “Military Policy” category on Amazon’s website.

The “white genocide conspiracy theory,” according to Georgetown University’s Bridge Initiative, “is the belief that immigration by people of color, falling white birth rates, and the promotion of multiculturalism are all part of a deliberate plot to destroy the ‘white race.’” The Anti-Defamation League says the concept was “coined by white supremacists for propaganda purposes as shorthand for one of the most deeply held modern white supremacist convictions: that the white race is ‘dying’ due to growing non-white populations and ‘forced assimilation.’”

Hosted by Air Force veteran and author L. Todd Wood, the “Information Operation” podcast on which Lohmeier appeared last month is produced by Creative Destruction Media, a far-right website that has pushed the QAnon conspiracy theory and continues to publish a wide range of debunked claims and misinformation alleging that the 2020 election was stolen, that the COVID-19 pandemic was “planned” by “globalists,” and more.

Lohmeier did not respond to a request for comment submitted through his personal website.

GOP uproar over ‘critical race theory’

Lohmeier’s criticism of the U.S. military and his removal from command come amid a growing national uproar from conservatives over “critical race theory,” a once-obscure academic term that experts say is now being widely misapplied to describe everything from diversity training and teaching the history of slavery to analyses of systemic racism and protests against police violence.

Since the beginning of 2021, Republican lawmakers in at least 21 states, many of them invoking the specter of critical race theory, have launched efforts to “restrict education on racism, bias, the contributions of specific racial or ethnic groups to U.S. history, or related topics,” according to Chalkbeat.

Days after Lohmeier’s removal, a group of 24 Republican members of Congress, including Lamborn and fellow Colorado Rep. Lauren Boebert, sent a letter to Air Force and Space Force officials praising his “level-headed critique” of current military policies, and calling for his immediate reinstatement. Lamborn at the time issued a statement that closely matched many of the attacks on critical race theory made in Lohmeier’s book.

Rep. Doug Lamborn shakes hands with President Donald Trump on stage during a Keep America Great rally on Feb. 20, 2020, in Colorado Springs. Vice President Mike Pence and Sen. Cory Gardner, a first-term Republican up for reelection this year, joined Trump at the rally. (Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images)

“I am growing increasingly concerned about the proliferation of training and discussions rooted in critical race theory throughout the Department of Defense,” Lamborn said. “This Marxist ideology teaches racial prejudice and collective guilt. The fact that it would be taught and promoted in the U.S. military is deeply disturbing.”

A spokesperson for Lamborn did not respond to multiple requests for comment on whether the congressman had read Lohmeier’s book, or whether he agreed with Lohmeier’s remarks on white “genocide.”

Lohmeier isn’t the only opponent of critical race theory to have recently veered into espousal of white genocide theory. James Lindsay, a well-known right-wing academic whose work Lohmeier cites in his book, faced criticism from many of his fellow conservatives last week after writing on Twitter that “there will be” a genocide of whites “if this ideology isn’t stopped.” Earlier this month, Lindsay was a featured panelist at the annual retreat of the Leadership Program of the Rockies, a conservative networking organization, at The Broadmoor resort in Colorado Springs.

“James Lindsay is now peddling White Genocide Theory,” Claire Lehmann, founder of the right-leaning website Quillette, wrote on Twitter on June 9. “Implying that a genocide against whites in the U.S. is imminent has the potential to inspire racist violence. Such comments are extreme, reckless, and irresponsible. They should be denounced.”

Lohmeier served in the Air Force for 14 years prior to his October 2020 transfer to the Space Force, which was established under the Department of the Air Force in 2019. The 11th Space Warning Squadron, which Lohmeier commanded, is a 69-member unit tasked with overseeing satellite-based missile warning systems.

Following the outcry from GOP members of Congress over Lohmeier’s removal, the Air Force inspector general said that it would conduct the investigation into his actions “due to the complexity and sensitivity of the issues under consideration, as well as potential for (Department of the Air Force)-wide impact,” a spokesperson told Military.com.

Lamborn continued to insist in an interview on Thursday that Lohmeier was “relieved of his command for speaking out against critical race theory.”

“If we let critical race theory, the 1619 Project, some of these other poisonous and destructive teachings take hold in our military … who’s going to want to defend it?” Lamborn said. “Who’s going to want to give years and years of their life, or possibly even make the ultimate sacrifice if called upon, for a country that is so flawed? That’s what really concerns me about critical race theory and these other treacherous teachings.”

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A suspect is being sought in connection with a home invasion shot by police in northern Houston, according to HPD
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 02:43:20 GMT
Woman killed in rollover accident in northwest Houston

A man who started two law enforcement shootings in 24 hours – including one with an off duty Harris County officer – was hospitalized on Sunday evening in critical condition due to police shooting, according to Houston Police Chief Troy Finner.

The man whose identity Finner has denied has a history of mental illness and was “in crisis,” Finner said during a new briefing. He described the man as “extremely dangerous” and said his family worked with the police all Sunday.

“Think how hard that is,” said Finner. “You have a loved one who, I don’t know his or her history, is probably a decent person, but who suffers from a mental illness. And then he shot a few citizens last night and got into a shootout with our officers today. So it’s tough for a family. ”

The first shooting occurred around 2 a.m. in the 2200 block of West Dallas. Police believe the man violently entered the home of an off duty Harris County Pct. 1 deputy police officer. He opened fire with a shotgun and an assault rifle and shot the MP’s wife in the leg and the stepdaughter’s arm, authorities said.

The suspect fled when the deputy returned fire. It is believed that the suspect was shot dead. There was a trail of blood leaving the apartment. According to the investigators, the motive is so far unknown. The two victims were in stable condition on Sunday morning, Finner said.

In the evening, SWAT officers received information that the suspect was near Greens Road and Interstate 45. The suspect shot officers trying to stop him in traffic, Finner said.

Finner said the suspect drove two blocks west where he shot again at officers trying to use a “maneuvering technique” to stop him.

He said officers would not have returned fire until the chase in the 500 block on West Greens Road was completed. The suspect crashed into a tree and shot the officers a third time. The officers shot him several times, said Finner. The suspect was operated on in a hospital, he said.

He said the police were wearing body cameras at the time. The Houston Police Department of Internal Affairs and its special investigation unit will investigate the shooting, he said.

The post A suspect is being sought in connection with a home invasion shot by police in northern Houston, according to HPD first appeared on DAILY TEXAS NEWS.
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Best-sellers
Sun, 20 Jun 2021 23:14:07 GMT

bestseller

fiction

LEGACY of Nora Roberts. Threats escalate in rhyme and location as the daughter of a successful fitness star’s daughter grows in yoga.

THE LAST ONE HE TOLD ME from Laura Dave. Hannah Hall discovers truths about her missing husband and connects with his daughter from a previous relationship.

SOOLEY by John Grisham. Samuel Sooleymon receives a North Carolina Central basketball scholarship and decides to bring his family out of civil war-ravaged South Sudan.

PROJECT HAIL MARY by Andy Weir. Ryland Grace wakes up from a long sleep, alone and far from home, with the fate of humanity resting on his shoulders.

DURING JUSTICE SLEEPS by Stacey Abrams. When Justice Wynn falls into a coma, attorney Avery Keene is forced to uncover evidence of a controversial case.

THE MIDNIGHT LIBRARY by Matt Haig. Nora Seed finds a library beyond the edge of the universe that contains books with multiple possibilities of the life one could have lived.

THE HILL WE CLIMB by Amanda Gorman. The poem read on President Joe Biden’s inauguration day by the youngest poet to write and perform an inaugural poem.

THIS SUMMER by Jennifer Weiner. Receiving emails meant for a woman leading a more glamorous life, Daisy Shoemaker finds that there is more to this accident.

THE SABOTEURS by Clive Cussler and Jack Du Brul. The twelfth book in the Isaac Bell Adventure series. An assassination attempt reveals a deeper Panama Canal conspiracy.

21st BIRTHDAY of James Patterson and Maxine Paetro. The 21st book in the Women’s Murder Club series. New evidence is changing the investigation into a missing mother.

Non-fiction

KILLING THE MOB by Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard. The tenth book in the conservative commentator’s Killing series deals with organized crime in the United States in the 20th century.

THE ANTHROPOCENE RATED by John Green. A collection of personal essays that shed light on various facets of the human-centered planet.

WHAT HAPPENED TO YOU? by Bruce D. Perry and Oprah Winfrey. An approach to dealing with trauma that shifts an essential question to investigate.

GREEN LIGHTS by Matthew McConaughey. The Oscar-winning actor shares excerpts from the diaries he has kept over the past 35 years.

ZERO FAIL by Carol Leonnig. The three-time Pulitzer Prize winner brings to light the secrets, scandals and inadequacies of intelligence.

THE PREDICTION by Michael Lewis. Stories from skeptics who spoke out against the Trump administration’s official response to the Covid-19 outbreak.

THE BOMBER MAFIA by Malcolm Gladwell. A look at the key players and results of precision bombing during World War II.

YEARBOOK by Seth Rogen. A collection of personal essays from the actor, writer, producer, director, entrepreneur, and philanthropist.

NOISE by Daniel Kahneman, Olivier Sibony and Cass R. Sunstein. What could lead to discrepancies in judgments that should be the same and possible ways to fix it.

BOX by Isabel Wilkerson. The Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist examines aspects of caste systems in various civilizations and reveals a rigid hierarchy in America today.

Paperback literature

WHERE THE CRAWDADS SING by Delia Owens.

THE SONG OF ACHILLES by Madeline Miller.

PEOPLE WE MEET ON HOLIDAY by Emily Henry.

THE SILENT PATIENT by Alex Michaelides.

THE BOOK OF LOST NAMES by Kristin Harmel.

Paperback non-fiction books

THE BODY HOLDS THE POINTS by Bessel van der Kolk.

BORN A CRIME of Trevor Noah.

BRAIDED SWEETGRASS by Robin Wall Kimmerer.

MURDERER OF THE FLOWER MOON by David Grann.

BE by Michelle Obama.

Source: New York Times

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Denver’s Historic African-American Community in Photographs
Tue, 08 Dec 2020 10:43:00 GMT

Dwight, Ed (1st black selected astronaut – sculptor)

This blog post was written by Laurier Cress, a University of Denver student who worked on a practicum project this fall in the Western History and Genealogy department at the Denver Public Library:

As an intern from the University of Denver I had the opportunity to work with Denver Public Library’s Western History and Genealogy Department on their most important collection of photographs pertaining to the history of Denver’s African American community. The Burnis McCloud collection captures various aspects of African American life from the 1940s through the 1980s. Scenes depict everyday life and elite social circles within the Black community. My task as one of two interns assigned to this collection during Fall 2020 was to digitize a small segment of this massive collection of 100,000 photographs. 

While sorting through McCloud’s collection, I found he did an excellent job making notations on the back of each photograph. Written on the back of each photograph is the event at which it was taken and the name of each subject (if known). The words written on the back of one image stood out to me. It read, “Dwight, Ed (1st black selected astronaut – sculptor)”. On the front side of the image I saw Dwight standing on the far-right side, clapping and looking directly at civil rights leader Jesse Jackson. My initial thought was, “Who is this man and why have I never heard of him before?”. 

To my knowledge, the first African American astronaut was Guion Bluford. My curiosity led me down a rabbit hole into trying to find as much information as possible on Dwight and his life. With the exception of a small Wikipedia page and a 2019 interview conducted by the New York Times, there wasn’t much information on Dwight. I quickly learned that Dwight was the first African American selected for NASA’s astronaut training program but due to racial politics of the time, he was never selected to go into space.

Being part of the astronaut training program thrust Dwight and his family into the spotlight. He was an inspiration to many in the Black community but a threat to those who saw Dwight as the personification of an integrated NASA. Dwight decided to leave the Air Force due to racial politics and went on to become one of the most successful sculptors of the 20th century. My research led me to learn that Dwight, at 87-years-old, was still sculpting in his Denver art studio. From that moment, I decided I had to attempt to contact him. As a fellow African American sculptor and future DU alumni, I felt a connection to him and his life.

NAACP Denver Branch Testimonial Dinner to Honor George L. Brown, ca. 1975. Ed Dwight, far right.

After listening to a couple of short interviews of Dwight, I recognized his voice the moment he answered my call. To be completely transparent, I was immediately nervous. I was going to talk to a historical figure who has made major contributions to the advancement of African Americans. He is also one of few people still alive from the period of McCloud’s collection.

Dwight was very receptive to speaking with me regarding his life story. At 87 years old, he still maintains a busy schedule and continues sculpting in his studio. However, he scheduled a time for me to interview him. When the day came to interview, I had a set list of questions I wanted to ask him but I quickly learned that Dwight was very passionate when talking about his fascinating life. Although I was not able to ask him all of the questions I wanted to, I learned invaluable information from Dwight about what the Black community was like in Denver from the 1950 through the 1970s.

I told Dwight that I was compelled to speak with him due to the photograph I came across in the Burnis McCloud collection. I asked him if he knew the photographer well. He told me he and McCloud weren’t close friends but he knew of him and his photography. Everyone respected McCloud within the Black community. Back then, the community was even smaller in Denver than it is today. When Dwight first moved to Denver in 1951, there were only 6,000 African American residents  and most lived in Park Hill. Dwight went on to say, 

“This is because we were restricted on where we could live. Blacks couldn’t live East of York (York Street). There was a lot of fear mongering by the real estate people to prevent us from moving outside this area. We were only allowed to move into other areas when Whites moved out, allowing Blacks to move in. Two in every five Black citizens in Denver worked in education. Two in every five worked for the federal government. The one in every five owned businesses. There weren’t a lot of Black business owners in Denver at this time. McCloud was in the middle of all of this.”

The origins of residential segregation in Denver began in 1925, with the assistance of the Ku Klux Klan and the local and federal government. By 1938, banks practiced redlining (the refusal of granting loans to a specific demographic or within a specific area) with the federal government’s blessing. White residents could take legal action against Black homeowners if they purchased a home within an all White community. Restrictive covenants were included in deeds to control who could purchase homes in areas deemed for Whites only. White homeowners would also sign legally binding contracts, agreeing not to sell or rent to African Americans. These actions were supported by the courts, White citizens, and city developers. These covenants laid the foundation for residential zoning and real estate policies that still have an impact on Denver today. Although the Supreme Court declared race-based covenants illegal in the early 1950s, African American residents were still subjected to racial segregation in real estate. 

I told Dwight since I started working with the McCloud collection, I was really interested in learning more about the African American community in Denver during McCloud’s active years. I told Dwight that whenever my mother talks about what life was like for Black folks back in the day, she always tells me it was a tight-knit community and that Black folks looked out for one another and tried to uplift each other. I asked him if he felt supported by the Black community when he moved to Denver

Dwight told me he arrived in 1951 to go to the Air Force’s testing facility to qualify for piloting. Upon his arrival, he received so much support from the Black community. When he arrived in Denver, he had a reputation as the first Black astronaut. Due to his reputation, he had already earned the respect of the community prior to his arrival. There were some people within the community that were worried he wanted to seek political gain but he wasn’t interested in political positions. Once Dwight settled down in Denver, he began pursuing a variety of career paths. He went on to say,

“I went on to work for IBM Corporation. IBM was grooming me to become the first Black vice president of IBM but I was tired of being the first Black this and the first Black that. I left IBM and started opening private businesses- a chain of restaurants, an aviation center at Denver Airport, an interior decoration firm, and a construction company.”

I also wanted to learn a little bit more about Dwight’s art and how he transitioned from aeronautical engineering to sculpture. Dwight told me he was 42 years old when he decided to pursue art. He started creating abstract art for lobbies with his interior decorating firm. It wasn’t until he connected with Lieutenant Governor George Brown that he began creating the sculptures and memorials he is known for today. When Dwight moved to Denver, he formed a friendship with Brown. One day, Brown asked him to create an African American memorial piece for the State Capitol Building. Dwight told me he turned Brown down at first. He wanted nothing to do with it but Brown encouraged him to pursue this path. He saw something in Dwight. He went on to say,

“At this time, I was successful and living a cushy life. I had several sports cars, airplanes, and made good money. I had a Porsche. But George told me to stop living this lifestyle. He told me I was meant to be more. I was meant to be the most famous Black sculptor in the United States. George asked me, ‘Can you find anything a Black person has made in a park, museum, or a gallery?’ He asked me, ‘Do you know who Frederick Douglas or Harriet Tubman is?’”

When Dwight couldn’t answer him, Brown flipped out. Brown jumped out of his seat and told Dwight, “You are walking around here talking about you’re the first Black astronaut and you don’t know who these people are or what they did?” Dwight thought about what Brown told him for the next several months. He went to several major cities and took 4,300 photos in the places he visited. When he returned to Denver, he found that none of the art in the photographs he took were created by or for Black people. Dwight said,

“I was so angry. George told me to go to the Denver Public Library and open a book to learn how to sculpt. From that moment, I sold all my companies and started learning how to sculpt.”

Dwight would go on to earn an M.F.A. in sculpture from the University of Denver (DU) in 1977. While working on his degree, he worked as the head of DU’s sculpture department and taught classes to undergraduate art students. 

During my conversation with Dwight, I confessed to him that I had never heard of him before I began working with the Burnis McCloud collection. After uncovering as much information about Dwight’s life as I could, I quickly learned that Dwight’s accomplishments and contributions towards the advancement of the African American community were compressed into a small footnote in history. 

Dwight’s story had nearly been forgotten until the New York Times interview in 2019. This is a far cry from the many magazines Dwight was featured in during his time in the astronaut training program. During his interview with the New York Times, Dwight was able to give voice to his experience in the astronaut training program and the racism he faced from his peers and superiors. Although Dwight excelled in the space program, NASA was not ready to integrate. He was told several times that it was too early for a Black man to do anything of this magnitude. 

Today, Dwight still sculpts and operates a metal casting foundry in his Denver art studio. He has created a total of 129 memorials and over 18,000 art pieces in his lifetime that can be seen throughout the United States and abroad. 

Laurier Cress

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Law Firm News – Former Public Defender Theresa Olson Apologizes For Jailhouse Encounter
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 01:10:37 GMT
News from the law firm - Former public defender Theresa Olson apologizes for encounter in prison 3

News for and about lawyers. . Defense of the public defender

Sobbing and clutching a handkerchief, former public defender Theresa Olson took the stand again yesterday and apologized for the negative consequences of a prison encounter with her client in a triple murder two years ago.

Theresa Olson, the former King County’s public defender who was accused of having sex with her client in a jail meeting room two years ago, testified yesterday that she had an inappropriate relationship and physical contact with her client, but claimed it did just be “a hug”. got bad. “

Olson gave a brief testimony of her conduct yesterday on the second day of a Washington State Bar Association disciplinary hearing, and much of her testimony was closed to the public.

Olson is alleged to have had sex with her client Sebastian Burns, who was later found guilty, along with his friend Atif Rafay, of the 1994 murder of Rafay’s father, mother and sister at their Bellevue home.

Prosecutors, who claim that Olson violated a legal ethical rule that prohibits lawyers from having sexual relations with their clients, wants her to be suspended for a year.

The hearing takes place in front of a Bar Association Hearing Examiner who determines the facts and the violation of rules or laws and then recommends sanctions, which can range from reprimand to suspension or exclusion.

The state Supreme Court will make a final decision on the proposed sanctions.

Olson testified that she and Burns had developed romantic feelings for each other and that she did not withdraw when Burns hugged her during their August 2002 meeting.

“I should have done it, but I didn’t,” she said, adding that the hug – which was more than platonic – had surprised her.

Several other witnesses, including Mark Larson of the King County District Attorney’s Office and Anne Harper of the District Attorney’s Office, said the incident was embarrassing to the local criminal justice system.

Harper also estimated the incident cost the county about $ 150,000 more than Olson Burns would have continued to represent. Lawyers for the Bar Association accidentally released this dollar amount during the hearing, even though the information had previously been sealed.

Olson’s attorney, David Allen, had requested that Harper’s testimony be curtailed as she, as King County’s public defender, is now a plaintiff in the county’s lawsuit against Olson and her law firm to reimburse costs related to the Burns’ delay.

At some point during her testimony, Harper asked for a break to collect himself, and Olson, who had shown little emotion during much of the testimony, collapsed.

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Proponents of a leisure marijuana tax hike obtain bipartisan assist
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 09:32:55 GMT
The Colorado Sun

By James Anderson, The Associated Press

Former Democratic and Republican governors have backed a coalition calling on Colorado voters to approve higher taxes on recreational marijuana to help children make up for learning losses during the pandemic and address the special needs of low-income and disadvantaged students, said the group on Wednesday.

Learning Opportunities for Colorado’s Children are circulating petitions in hopes of collecting nearly 250,000 voter signatures by August 2, which will be needed to place their initiative on the November vote.

The campaign said former Democratic Governor Bill Ritter, former Republican Governor Bill Owens, state lawmakers from both parties, and a variety of educational and advocacy groups, many of whom care for black and Latin American children, have supported the effort.

Initiative 25 would create a Colorado Learning Authority within the state Department of Education to oversee after-school tutoring, English teaching, teaching for special needs and disabilities, mental health and careers, and technical education for children ages 5-17 to oversee children from low-income families and high school students who lag behind their grade level through certifying tutors who can be teachers who do the work outside of regular working hours.

The funds cannot be used for in-school expenses or private school tuition and would be distributed directly to the tutors.

To pay for the program, supporters want voters to approve a 5% increase in excise tax on recreational marijuana by 2024 to generate more than $ 137 million a year. The sale of leisure tubs is currently subject to a government sales tax of 2.9% and a consumption tax of 15%, with some of the proceeds being used to build and maintain schools.

The planned tax increase is to be introduced gradually from next year. The agency would also take over some of the existing rental and license fee income paid for activities on state land and could seek external funding.

In April, Colorado consumers purchased approximately $ 166.5 million worth of recreational cannabis. Excise tax revenues on these sales exceeded $ 25 million, according to the Treasury Department.

The recreational marijuana industry is skeptical of the proposal, saying in part that continued cannabis tax hikes could encourage black market sales.

“This initiative helps improve the playing field and improve those for whom there are too few options,” Papa Dia, executive director of Aurora-based African Leadership Group that serves the African immigrant community, said in a statement.

“With LEAP, we can narrow the gap in opportunities between rich and poor, between students from homes where English is not spoken as their first or primary language, and between those who attend high-performing schools and those who don’t,” said Slide.

The initiative would complement Democratic Governor Jared Polis’s focus on early childhood education, including expanding preschool and kindergarten education.

The Colorado Sun doesn’t have a paywall, which means readers don’t have to pay to access stories. We believe that important information needs to be seen by data subjects, whether it is a public health crisis, investigative reports or legislative accountability.

This coverage depends on the support of readers like you. Invest in an informed community for just $ 5 / month.

The post Proponents of a leisure marijuana tax hike obtain bipartisan assist first appeared on Education News Colorado.

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Savannah Grove’s LaKeesha Burroughs was named Teacher of the Month in June | Local news
Sun, 20 Jun 2021 22:42:32 GMT
Savannah Grove's LaKeesha Burroughs was named Teacher of the Month in June |  Local news

FLORENCE, SC – Second grade teacher at Savannah Grove Elementary School, LaKeesha Burroughs, received a surprise on the penultimate day of school this year.

Just after 1 p.m. on June 10, Headmaster Latonya Yates-Ford Burroughs called into the office to tell her she had been named June Morning News / Chick-fil-A Teacher of the Month.

“It’s really an honor,” said Burroughs. “[I’m] very excited. I am very passionate about what I do every day. “

Blake Pate, one of three local Chick-fil-A franchisees sponsoring the award, previously said that Chick-fil-A is the company that claims they care and there is a way to show it in giving back to the community with programs like Teacher The Monthly Program.

Burroughs added that she served as the virtual teacher for second graders at the school later that year.

At the start of the school year, the Florence One Schools, like most districts in the country, offered parents the choice of sending their children to school on alternate days or entirely virtually. The district later added a full five-day option and folded the changeover day option into the five-day option.

Yates-Ford said whenever the county offered parents of Burroughs students the opportunity to switch to face-to-face tuition, they declined because Burroughs would no longer be their children’s teacher.

The post Savannah Grove's LaKeesha Burroughs was named Teacher of the Month in June | Local news first appeared on Peach State Press.

Category: Savannah
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Property Technology And The Real Estate Industry
Sun, 20 Jun 2021 07:50:16 GMT
Real estate investment

Property Technology has revolutionized the real estate market worldwide. It has revolutionized the entire real estate industry more. Technology played an important role in its emergence. The advancement in information technology has allowed the real estate industry to expand much faster and provide better services and customer satisfaction. These qualities today include information technology, computer science, business administration, finance, and other related fields. The developer has therefore become very efficient and has increased its profit margin many times over.

Real estate technologies offer real estate companies the opportunity to effectively and efficiently extend their services to the consumer market. The real estate industry has seen a huge surge in investment, which has resulted in numerous startups and a significant surge in the number of companies in the industry. Real estate technology was an important part of it and the founders of the co-working company Prop-tech definitely managed to bring it all together.

The main idea in creating real estate technology was to use advanced computer software and innovative business models to create an environment where the assets of investors and entrepreneurs were brought together under one roof. This was an excellent idea and is at the core of the success of the Prop-tech coworking company. Real estate technology enables investors and entrepreneurs to find, manage and use their valuable assets easily and inexpensively. The best part about the whole idea is that it has been tested over a long period of time and has shown positive results. Many of the investors and entrepreneurs have already benefited from the innovative business models of the Property Technology Company.

House with pool

Commercial real estate investors can now leverage the same innovative real estate technology solutions that commercial real estate investors have used to improve their business. The innovative real estate technology offers a comprehensive set of tools to help entrepreneurs and investors to manage their assets cost-effectively. This means that these innovative solutions benefit not only property investors, but also commercial property owners. However, the Property Technology Company’s greatest strength is that it has been able to incorporate various techniques and solutions to improve the overall performance and bottom line of the property investment business. In short, the company’s real estate technology is capable of transforming the real estate investment business into something better, faster, and more profitable.

Real estate investors can take advantage of the real estate technology company’s intelligent building software solutions that help them build, manage, and maintain their real estate assets in the most cost effective way possible. In fact, their real estate investment portfolio will be more profitable because of the innovative software solutions they develop. An important aspect of the real estate investment business is making sure your building stays top notch and is the safest and most reliable on the market. The building software solutions from prophecy should make your building more intelligent, efficient and reliable in every respect.

As landlords who invest in real estate, it is always a difficult task for them to make their real estate asset class safe and reliable. That makes the task even more challenging for investors. On the one hand, investors need to make sure that they choose a high quality real estate tech solution from a reputable real estate company. On the other hand, landlords also have to take care of various things, such as the timely maintenance of the building, the fastest possible repair of minor damage, maximizing rental income and so on. Therefore, the combination of the best property tech solution and the right landlord is the recipe for success for investors and landlords.

The post Property Technology And The Real Estate Industry first appeared on REALESTATE NEWS24.

Category: Technology
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Ford F-350 Class Action Lawsuit Says Labels Were Wrong
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 06:55:19 GMT
Ford F-350 class action lawsuit states that labels were incorrect


Ford F-350 Super Duty Trucks reportedly cannot handle the load capacity advertised for the trucks.

June 20, 2021 – A Ford F-350 class action lawsuit alleges that 2020 model year trucks were sold with incorrect tire and payload labels, making the trucks less valuable than they should be.

Under the Ford F-350 class action lawsuit, the complaint includes:

“Anyone in the United States who owned a Ford F-Super Duty: F350 with a 6.7 liter diesel engine, single rear wheels (SRW), 4×4, crew cab, long box, and either 12k or 12.4k gross weights prior to March 2021 (GVWR). “

In February 2021, Ford announced a recall of nearly 10,000 2020 model year F-350 trucks with excessive payload values ​​on the tire and load information labels, excessive reserve capacity values ​​for accessories on the safety certification labels, and excessive weight information on documents when the RV was loaded.

Ford said a driver could experience longer braking distances if the suspensions were overloaded. In addition, the automaker announced in February that it was not aware of any injuries or accidents caused by the incorrect labels.

The class action lawsuit alleges that Ford advised F-350 owners that it would not offer repairs or refunds other than through Ford’s standard warranties.

Ford dealers have been instructed to replace the incorrect labels and documents.

According to plaintiff David M. Rathmann, when the F-350 was purchased, the payload capacity on the tire and load information label was 4,576 pounds. However, when informed of the label’s recall, the plaintiff learned that the correct payload capacity was 4,237 pounds.

The Ford F-350 class action lawsuit also alleges that the plaintiff’s truck had a safety certification label that incorrectly stated that the reserve capacity of the front axle accessory was 926 pounds and the total reserve capacity of the accessory was 1,141 pounds.

However, in May 2021, the plaintiff received a replacement label as part of the F-350 recall. The class action lawsuit states that the reserve capacity of the front axle accessory was actually 834 pounds and the total reserve capacity of the accessory was 803 pounds.

Ford also provided the plaintiff with a new RV truck load document stating that the cargo weight was 3,305 pounds.

The plaintiff says Ford did not tell him when he purchased the truck that the payload and weight load capabilities were incorrect, and none of the nearly 10,000 F-350 truck owners would have bought the vehicles if Ford told them the ratings were wrong were.

The Ford F-350 class action lawsuit has been filed in the US District Court for the Western District of Texas, Waco Division: David M. Rathmann vs. Ford Motor Company.

The plaintiff is represented by Nix Patterson, LLP, Paranjpe Mahadass Ruemke LLP and Daniels & Tredennick PLLC.

The post Ford F-350 Class Action Lawsuit Says Labels Were Wrong first appeared on DAILY LEGAL PRESS.

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Tight Labor Market Returns the Upper Hand to American Workers
Sun, 20 Jun 2021 18:34:32 GMT

Low-wage workers found something unexpected in the economy’s recovery from the pandemic: leverage.

Ballooning job openings in fields requiring minimal education—including in restaurants, transportation, warehousing and manufacturing—combined with a shrinking labor force are giving low-wage workers perks previously reserved for white-collar employees. That often means bonuses, bigger raises and competing offers.

Average weekly wages in leisure and hospitality, the sector that suffered the steepest job losses in 2020, were up 10.4% in May from February 2020, Labor Department data show, outpacing the private sector overall and inflation. Pay for those with only high school diplomas is rising faster than for college graduates, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.

“It’s a workers’ labor market right now and increasingly so for blue-collar workers,” said

Becky Frankiewicz,

president of staffing firm

ManpowerGroup Inc.’s

North America operations. “We have plenty of demand and not enough workers.”

Lower-wage employers are boosting pay and offering gift cards to applicants who show up for interviews, along with sign-on and retention bonuses, and sometimes immediate employment before drug screenings and background checks, she said.

While benefiting workers, higher labor costs can have consequences for employers in the form of narrower profit margins and missed sales if a restaurant section remains closed or orders can’t be filled quickly because of a staffing shortage. And when they do raise wages, employers are attempting to pass some of the higher costs on to customers, which could be contributing to the current upsurge of inflation. All those factors act as a potential brake on what is expected to be rapid economic growth in the second half of 2021.

Kyle Mathews was hired by ColorHub, a digital trade printing company, through a hiring agency after he left his job at a grocery store during the pandemic.



Photo:

Elaine Cromie for The Wall Street Journal

Kyle Mathews,

27 years old, is among the workers benefiting. He had worked at a large grocery store in Grand Rapids, Mich., for about four years in various positions. He said he was frustrated by the pay of about $14 an hour, the top of the store’s pay scale, and the long hours. Plus, Mr. Mathews said he felt uncomfortable last year serving the public during a pandemic.

In February, he visited a staffing firm, Express Employment Professionals. “It felt to me like the right time to start looking for something else because the economy was rebounding,” he said.

Mr. Mathews quickly lined up several interviews. He quizzed potential employers about company culture and advancement opportunities. He landed a half dozen offers and accepted a position at ColorHub, which prints graphics on packaging, store displays and signage.

His new job pays $16 an hour, plus overtime, and he is training for a role as a higher-skill machine operator that would pay an additional $2 an hour. “The company is growing, and I’m excited to see where it takes me,” he said. With the extra earnings, Mr. Mathews was able to take a vacation to Utah and is saving to buy a house with his girlfriend.

ColorHub continued to hire throughout 2020 and into this year, adding about 10 people to bring its staff to 30, said Chief Executive

Tim Harris.

In the spring of 2020, the four-year-old company was receiving 100 applications for an online job posting. This year, that dried up to a handful, and several of those applicants wouldn’t show up for interviews.

That led ColorHub to raise its starting pay by about $2 an hour and seek the help of the staffing firm to land workers such as Mr. Mathews, Mr. Harris said.

“It’s been challenging to find workers,” he said. “It used to be you could interview several people and go a couple of weeks without making an offer. Now if you don’t give someone a job on the spot, you might not get them.”

Kyle Mathews watches as a sheet of packing material passes through a digital printer. His position pays $16 an hour, plus overtime, and he is training for a role as a higher-skill machine operator that would pay an additional $2 an hour.



Photo:

Elaine Cromie for The Wall Street Journal

Low-wage workers’ newfound leverage could have staying power—and, in fact, began to emerge before the start of the Covid-19 pandemic. The pandemic pushed some Americans into retirement and convinced others they should return to work only for more pay or improved conditions. Raises that increase base pay to attract workers now will be tough to roll back later, employers and economists say.

Although that bargaining power may be nearing a peak and begin to ease once pandemic-era benefits expire, many economists expect the labor market to remain tight for the foreseeable future.

“There are not a lot of unemployed workers out there for firms to be trying to hire,” said

Matt Notowidigdo,

an economist at the University of Chicago. That’s far different than after the 2007-2009 recession, when less-educated workers faced an elevated unemployment rate for several years, he said.

Some of the deterrents to work may reverse once the economy fully reopens. Nearly 15 million people claimed unemployment insurance benefits in late May, up from about 2 million before the pandemic. Some may not be working because they receive more from the enhanced unemployment benefits offered during the crisis than they would earn in the available jobs. But those benefits expire in September.

Other people out of the workforce fear catching or spreading the virus, worries that should ease as infections decline and vaccination rates rise.

If lower-wage workers can retain the upper hand, it would have little modern precedent, harking back a half-century to when many more of those employees were represented by labor unions. It could also spell tougher times for small firms unable to match what bigger more productive companies can pay, such as the nation’s two largest private-sector employers,

Amazon.com Inc.

and

Walmart Inc.

Wylie Brown, a driver with American Dedicated Logistics, loads his delivery truck with car parts in Catonsville, Md. The company has been recruiting at shopping centers, hoping to attract retail workers and Uber drivers, with better or more consistent pay than their current jobs offer.



Photo:

Amanda Andrade-Rhoades for The Wall Street Journal

American Dedicated Logistics in Midlothian, Va., has raised pay for cargo van drivers to about $16.50 an hour from $12.50 two years ago, said company president

Mark Collins.

That rate is still below what Amazon and its suppliers pay, he said. Mr. Collins said he is urging clients—ranging from medical lab services to large retailers—to raise prices or charge delivery fees so that drivers’ wages can be raised further. But he knows that would likely mean higher prices for end consumers, who balk at delivery fees, in part because Amazon did away with them.

He said he expects the prevailing rate for cargo van drivers to reach $20 an hour in the next year or two.

In addition to advertising higher wages, American Dedicated Logistics is recruiting at shopping centers, hoping to attract retail workers and Uber drivers, with better or more consistent pay than their current jobs offer.

“I can’t snap my fingers and create drivers,” Mr. Collins said. “Customers are saying they could give us more work if we could get more drivers. We missed out on a lot of business during last year’s holiday peak.”

James Booth, a driver with American Dedicated Logistics, loads up his delivery truck with car parts. The company has recently raised pay for cargo van drivers.



Photo:

Amanda Andrade-Rhoades for The Wall Street Journal

The shift in fortunes for low-wage workers marks a reversal after decades of lost ground. Wages and benefits averaged 72% of national income, excluding indirect taxes and subsidies, from 1970 through 1995 and then steadily declined, falling to 66% by 2014. That corresponded with a rise in corporate profits and an increasing share of the pie going to business owners and white-collar workers.

Economists cite several factors for this trend: increased trade with low-wage countries and possibly competition with lower-skilled immigrants. Declines in union membership and the minimum wage, when adjusted for inflation, are also at play. Technology and automation reduced the demand for some routine skills, holding back the pay of less-educated workers. Paradoxically, the higher wages resulting from the current shortage of workers could spur businesses to adopt more automation, reducing their need for labor and moderating job growth.

Tight labor markets have tended to counter those forces. When unemployment fell below 5% in the late 1990s and again in 2017, wage growth accelerated and employers stepped up recruiting from long-disadvantaged groups. By 2019, labor’s share of national income had edged up to 68%. Although federal assistance programs during the pandemic have distorted the data, those gains appear to have held.

The combination of the reopening economy, several rounds of fiscal stimulus and near-zero interest rates could soon recreate the tight labor market conditions that bolstered pay in 2019. Last week, Federal Reserve officials predicted the unemployment rate would fall to 3.5% by the end of 2023, matching its pre-pandemic lows.

Whereas demand for labor drove wage gains in 2019, now both demand and a smaller pool of workers are at play. The share of the working-age population either holding or seeking a job has fallen to 61.6% in May from 63.3% in February 2020—a loss of 3.5 million potential employees. This may have raised what economists call the “reservation” wage, the lowest pay for which someone is willing to work. Workers without a college degree have increased their annual reservation wage to $61,000 from $52,000 in late 2019, according to surveys by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.

Josh Gingery moves and stacks shipping material at ColorHub, which has been expanding its staff in recent months.



Photo:

Elaine Cromie for The Wall Street Journal

The Dot Foods Inc. distribution center in Williamsport, Md., has raised wages an average of 4% in each of the past four years in an effort to stay ahead of other area employers, including an Amazon warehouse and

Target Corp.

store, said

Brian Duffield

Sr., general manager of the center and other East Coast locations. Dot warehouse workers start at $19.25 an hour.

“We realized we had to scale up our wages to be more attractive to workers,” he said. “We saw 90% of our hires already were employed elsewhere.”

Despite trying to offer competitive pay, the company is still short on employees. Mr. Duffield said he would fill 25 additional warehouse jobs in Maryland if he could. To make up for the vacancies, many warehouse employees are working 50 hours a week—translating to 10 hours of time-and-a-half pay. Although they are earning more as a result, overtime pay raises labor costs for the company and Mr. Duffield said he is concerned about employee burnout.

Dot Foods is monitoring recent raises handed out by nearby employers and is contemplating if it needs to follow suit. “If they decide to make another bump we’ll have to do the same,” he said.

The political climate may also be shifting in ways likely to support the bargaining power of low-wage workers, a priority of President Biden’s. The $1.9 trillion American Rescue Plan he signed into law in March was intended in part to get the U.S. to full employment faster. In Cleveland last month, Mr. Biden said: “Instead of workers competing with each other for jobs that are scarce…we want the companies to compete to attract workers.”

Republicans argue that stimulus added unnecessarily to the deficit at a time when the economy was already recovering. Their resistance also stands in the way of Democrats’ efforts to raise the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour from $7.25.

Mr. Biden may find some common ground with Republicans who, since

Donald Trump’s

presidency, have become less enamored of free trade and other traditional business priorities. The Biden administration has already brought a complaint related to the treatment of workers and unions in Mexico under the provisions of the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement, which Mr. Trump negotiated with significant input from Democrats.

So far, unions have played little direct role in the boost to worker leverage. Union membership in the private sector, at 6.3% in 2020, is trending near the lowest levels on records back to the 1970s, according to the Labor Department. And many of the businesses that are competing for less-educated workers, including Amazon and

McDonald’s Corp.

, aren’t unionized. Organized labor suffered a setback when workers at an Amazon fulfillment center in Bessemer, Ala., voted against forming a union in April.

William Spriggs,

chief economist to the AFL-CIO labor federation, said unions’ support for a $15 minimum wage and their efforts to organize companies like Amazon deserve some credit for spurring changes in low-wage workers’ pay and working conditions.

Amazon said in May that it would hire 75,000 workers and offer $1,000 signing bonuses in some locations, while pledging to pay at least $15 an hour. McDonald’s said recently that it wants to hire 10,000 employees at company-owned restaurants and raise pay at those locations. Walmart said it would raise wages for about 425,000 of its employees.

Some smaller businesses are resigned to losing employees to better-paying competitors.

Ben Crawford was hired at ColorHub after working at Amazon and a catering company that was closed due to the pandemic.



Photo:

Elaine Cromie for The Wall Street Journal

Layne’s Chicken Fingers restaurants have lost employees to Walmart, McDonald’s and QuikTrip convenience stores, said Chief Executive

Garrett Reed.

The Frisco, Texas, chain offers $11 or $12 an hour for entry-level jobs.

“The biggest challenge for small companies to grow right now is your labor force,” said Mr. Reed. “We’d be growing at twice the rate if we had more people.”

Mr. Reed said he has pending deals to lease four locations in the Dallas area for restaurants. He is holding off on signing the leases because he worries he can’t attract the needed workers, especially managers.

“There’s only so much I can pay and remain profitable without raising prices too much,” Mr. Reed said. He said he has elevated workers in their late teens and early 20s to general-manager positions that pay more than $50,000 a year.

“We’re so thin at leadership that we can’t stretch anymore to open more locations,” he said. “I’ve got a good crop of 16- and 17-year-olds, but I need another year or two to get them seasoned to run stores.”

Write to Eric Morath at eric.morath@wsj.com and Greg Ip at greg.ip@wsj.com

Copyright ©2020 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 87990cbe856818d5eddac44c7b1cdeb8

The post Tight Labor Market Returns the Upper Hand to American Workers first appeared on LABOR NEWS WIRE.

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Planes, helicopters, automobiles at Fresno occasions
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 08:08:00 GMT
Planes, helicopters, cars at Fresno events

FRESNO, Calif. (KFSN) – Many braved the heat on Saturday to tour planes, helicopters, and even the cars on display at Father’s Day Fly-in and Auto Show at Sierra Sky Park.

The free event in northwest Fresno included face-painting, lawn games, and food trucks.

There was a parachute delivery of an American flag from Bulldog Blitz, an all-female skydiving team.

The City of Fresno and Fresno County sponsored the event.

“The Sierra SkyPark Airport has been here all my life and it really is one of the jewels in northwest Fresno. Now that COVID is over, it’s a great way for families to be outdoors. they can make the cars, it’s a safe event, “said Councilor Mike Karbassi.

The event ended on Sunday, but the End-O-Summer Fly-in and Auto Show will take place on October 2nd.

Copyright © 2021 KFSN-TV. All rights reserved.

The post Planes, helicopters, automobiles at Fresno occasions first appeared on DAILY CALIFORNIA PRESS.

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American Airlines is seeking a delay in accounting for benefits, but city council is pushing ahead
Sun, 20 Jun 2021 12:15:20 GMT

Philadelphia City Councilor Kenyatta Johnson said he was drafting a bill to provide new health care services to several thousand airport service workers, despite driving back costs from American Airlines, the city’s dominant airline.

The predominantly black and brown workforce was essential to airport operations during the pandemic, struggled to distance themselves from the traveling public, and often lacked health insurance, Johnson said during a council meeting Thursday. They “don’t have to worry about going bankrupt anytime” because there is no health care, he said.

Johnson amended the bill to address some concerns from small business owners, and said he would approve the measure on Jan.

The PHL Prevailing Wage Bill, which was introduced last month, would raise wages to about $ 15 an hour and add an hourly surcharge of $ 4.54 for health services for certain airport workers – from wheelchair attendants and aircraft cabin cleaners to catering – Staff preparing meals for flights and airport shop and restaurant staff. The airport is owned by the city and airlines and other private companies operate there under lease agreements with the city.

During the pandemic, New York and New Jersey passed similar laws that increase benefits for airport employees on the front lines. Philadelphia legislation is already supported by a majority of the co-sponsored councilors and the mayor’s office.

Unions say their members often cannot afford health insurance from an employer, leaving workers uninsured or dependent on government Medicaid benefits and at particular risk during the spread of COVID-19. At a city council hearing in May, workers testified that they had to choose between getting health insurance or paying other bills.

Many of the workers covered by the law are employed by airline subcontractors and are unionized through Service Employees International Union (SEIU) Local 32BJ. The union represented more than 2,500 airport workers before the pandemic, and around 2,000 are back to work at PHL. Employees earn at least $ 13.60 an hour.

American said the bill is for a 44% wage increase “all at once,” and that the cost “will have a negative impact on service levels, particularly international service levels, in Philadelphia,” according to a letter from American executive vice versa dated Jan. .President for Corporate Affairs to Johnson.

According to the letter, the airline said it had negotiated with SEIU and made proposals that will give workers a raise this year and “provide a path to meaningful health care benefits … when the aviation industry recovers from the pandemic”.

That is not soon enough for union workers, said Gabe Morgan, vice president of Local 32BJ, given the bailouts the airlines have received and how “our members have survived a pandemic with no health care.”

“The idea that they would somehow refuse to provide medical care to wheelchair users … just seems insolent to us,” Morgan said.

For his part, Johnson said, “In this particular case, American Airlines is making unreasonable demands.”

“I think American Airlines could be great corporate partners if they really looked at the health care issues and prevailing wages for the poor black and brown workers who work every day to move the airport forward,” Johnson said in an interview .

A spokesman for Mayor Jim Kenney said the government was ready to enforce the law, as deputy mayor for labor Rich Lazer promised on the council last month.

“It is still our position,” said Deputy Communications Director Kevin Lessard, adding, “We continue to hope that American Airlines will find an amicable solution to all outstanding issues with the organized workforce and councilor.”

The airline has received around $ 13 billion from federal Payroll Support Program funds since last year.

Ten members of the Pennsylvania congressional delegation also sent a reprimanding letter to American last week saying they were “dismayed that American Airlines is pushing for a delay” on the bill and noted the billions in federal aid to airlines.

United States Congressman Conor Lamb (D., Pennsylvania), vice chairman of the House Aviation Subcommittee, was one of the signatories. “We just finished saving this industry,” Lamb said in an interview. “If you do that, I believe we have a say in how your employees should be treated.”

In response to the delegation’s letter, American said it cared “very much about working families, especially low-wage workers.” The airline expects the average daily departures from Philadelphia this summer to decrease by 30% compared to 2019, and expects an overall “significant” financial loss in the second quarter.

Some small business owners also protested the speed with which legislation went through the council and the cost of their shops and restaurants when airport traffic was still recovering from the pandemic declines. These entrepreneurs, who operate under an airport underprivileged business program aimed at women and people of color, voiced their concerns to Johnson’s office and the Pennsylvania Restaurant and Lodging Association.

Johnson said he was “very sensitive to small businesses” at PHL. He introduced amendments to the bill on Thursday that include a wage increase through January 2022 and the portion of health benefits through July 2023 for restaurant and retail workers. Johnson also said he would look into other possible “relief measures” for concession companies.

A restaurant association spokesman, government affairs director Zak Pyzik, said the changes “allow airport retailers time to return and take steps to increase cash flow for our operators.”

Pyzik said addressing other airport business costs, such as rent and restrictions on item pricing, “before the bill goes into effect is the only way our airport companies can continue to operate and employ Philadelphians”.

The post American Airlines is seeking a delay in accounting for benefits, but city council is pushing ahead first appeared on LABOR NEWS WIRE.

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Some simple truths about critical race theory and the cynical campaign to distort it
Mon, 21 Jun 2021 09:27:36 GMT
Some simple truths about critical race theory and the cynical campaign to distort it

Image: Adobe Stock

[Editor’s note: As most readers are aware, groups on the American political right have launched an aggressive and coordinated campaign in recent weeks to mobilize conservative white voters by attacking “critical race theory.” Here in North Carolina, the effects of this national campaign have already been felt and seen in many places, including the concerted effort to block the granting of tenure to acclaimed journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones at UNC-Chapel Hill  and in legislation approved by the state House (House Bill 324) designed to limit unflattering discussions of race in public school history curricula.

Today, in order to help advance public understanding of this much misunderstood topic, Policy Watch is pleased to share a pair of outstanding and highly illuminating essays authored by veteran journalists for two of our sibling publications in the States Newsroom network, the Kansas Reflector and Georgia Recorder. Although both were written in response to actions taken by politicians in their respective states, readers will have no trouble discerning the relevance of both essays to discussions in North Carolina. We hope you will read and share them both widely.]

What conservative politicians need to know about critical race theory

By Mark McCormick

The late historian John Henrik Clarke explained the dominant subculture’s preoccupation with manipulating history.

Modern racism incubated when Europeans “began manipulating history in the 15th century to justify the slave trade,” Clarke, a pioneer in Pan-African studies, said in an interview with Tony Brown on Brown’s eponymous show in the 1970s.

Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt joined 19 other attorneys general in a letter challenging the U.S. Department of Education’s proposed funding priorities for grants supporting American history and civics programs. (Photo by Noah Taborda/Kansas Reflector)

Critical race theory is a catchall for the study of American history and institutions as extensions of racial injustice that influence law, the economy and culture. Its detractors embody Clarke’s explanation, Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt among them.

What has needed hiding, essentially from the country’s founding until today? Much of what critical race theory opponents still want hidden. It’s gruesome, but it’s our history.

Most of us learned, for example, about slave traders and slave owners, but never about slave breakers, who employed ghastly means to break the spirits of enslaved Africans. Slave breakers tortured husbands to death in front of pregnant wives, hoping to not only break the spirit of the woman but intending to funnel fear into the unborn child. Slave breakers also sliced the unborn from their mother’s wombs and killed them in front of their fathers.

“You cannot enslave a man and say he is a human being,” Clarke said.

“The American Slave Trade,” by John R. Spears, “From Slavery to Freedom,” by John Hope Franklin, “The Negro Family in the United States,” by E. Franklin Frazier, “Antislavery,” by Dwight Lowell Dumond and “Malcolm X on Afro-American History” all reference this process.

Could a society justifying this actually grant Black people equal rights?

It hasn’t, and attacking critical race theory offers ways to justify racial wealth and health gaps and other forms of socially engineered inequality.

Slavery begat sharecropping and convict leasing, during which people who’d been systematically denied jobs were arrested for vagrancy, imprisoned, and then worked to death.

African Americans endured segregation and a period of lynching that extended deep into the 20th century. Throngs attended lynchings. Some collected the victims’ skin and teeth as souvenirs. Others made postcards of the spectacle.

The Tulsa race massacre of 1921 wasn’t an outlier. Similar incidents happened in places like Wilmington, N.C., and Springfield, Missouri.

That period gave way to housing discrimination.

Our government offered loans to white families moving from urban housing projects to new homes in publicly funded suburbs. Black families were explicitly denied such loans and couldn’t escape to better schools or build wealth through home ownership as the emerging white middle class did.

Richard Rothstein’s “The Color of Law” expertly detailed these practices, explaining that current housing patterns aren’t an accident, but the result of explicit government policy.

The bipartisan Kerner Commission Report in 1968 addressed these housing patterns. “What white Americans have never fully understood — but what the Negro can never forget — is that white society is deeply implicated in the ghetto,” the report read. “White institutions created it, white institutions maintain it, and white society condones it.”

Those housing patterns still frustrate efforts at school integration and educational equality.

Many Americans are rightfully ashamed of this history. Others who don’t know — or who don’t care to know — are the people angered by Colin Kaepernick and others pursuing critical race theory-driven discussions.

But attempts by Schmidt and others to hide this history are misguided.

How do you evade prosecution for a crime?

Silence the witnesses.

Critical race theory’s only error is its name. It isn’t a theory at all. It represents the lived Black experience. And I haven’t mentioned red-lining, environmental racism (Flint, Mich.), police terror, mass incarceration or how the government typically rammed interstate highways through Black communities.

Race remains an organizing principle in America. Any racial reckoning requires an understanding of this fundamental fact. From the Three-fifths Compromise, to the U.S. Supreme Court’s Dred Scott ruling that enslaved people had “no rights the white man was bound to respect,” to today.

Yes, we’ve revised the Constitution and no, Scott is no longer precedent. But there’s much more to do and critical race theory is a part of that healing process.

We don’t arrive at truth until suffering speaks.

Critical race theory opponents — some of whom also are whitewashing the Jan. 6 insurrection — want to keep their knees on truth’s neck, hoping to silence the horrors and suffering of the past.

The maintenance of our current status quo depends on it.

Mark McCormick is the former executive director of The Kansas African American Museum and a former newspaper columnist.

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Hysteria over ‘critical race theory’ is to embrace willful blindness

By Jay Bookman

Prodded by Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp, the state Board of Education last week waded into the controversy over “critical race theory,” or more accurately, into a cartoon version of the theory that has been ginned up by Fox News and the conservative entertainment industry to keep its viewers in a state of racial panic.

“The United States of America is not a racist country, and … the state of Georgia is not a racist state,” the board informed us in a resolution passed in a specially called meeting. Furthermore, the board instructed Georgia educators not to teach that “one race or sex is inherently superior to another race or sex,” or that “an individual should be discriminated against or receive adverse treatment solely or partly because of the individual’s race.”

These are not, ordinarily, the kind of controversial sentiments that require hastily called meetings to endorse, but the context here is important. Kemp and the Board of Education are following the example of other conservatives around the country who are rushing to pass similar laws and resolutions. They have convinced themselves that white is the new black, that schools and universities are engaged in a conspiracy to discriminate on the basis of race, and that this time the target of that discrimination is white people.

I know, I know: It’s a ridiculous claim. But if you can convince millions of people that nonexistent vote fraud cost Donald Trump the election, in contradiction to every piece of available evidence, then you can convince them of almost anything if they want to believe it hard enough.

In its resolution, the board also attempted to downplay the roles that slavery and racism have played in our nation’s history. In the board’s view, Georgia’s schoolchildren should be taught that racism and slavery were never central to American values, but were mere “deviations from, betrayals of, or failures to live up to, the authentic founding principles of the United States, which include liberty and equality.”

That is simply false. Racism and slavery were indeed central to our founding, to the point that those supposed “deviations” and “betrayals” were enshrined in the Constitution, our nation’s founding document. Here in Georgia, slavery may have been banned for the first 15 years of the colony’s existence, but by 1750 that ban was lifted because white settlers complained it was impossible to make money here without Black slaves to work and die in the brutal heat and humidity.

If we are to take justified pride in those good things that our ancestors accomplished, in the nation that they built — if we erect statues to them and name schools and buildings and cities after them, if we warm ourselves a bit in their reflected glory, as the heirs to their greatness — is it not then dishonest to pretend that their mistakes do not also echo down into our own times? What wonderful magic is it that only the good they did lives on after them, and in us, while their evil somehow died with them, without leaving a trace?

There is no such magic. There is only blindness, willful blindness. Heritage and history are not a buffet line, where you can pick and choose the things you like while ignoring the distasteful.

Since 1926, a statue of Alexander Stephens, the vice president of the Confederacy, has sat in the U.S. Capitol as one of two Georgia heroes designated by the state. In celebrating Georgia’s secession from the Union, Stephens had explained that the cornerstone of the Confederacy “rests upon the great truth that the negro is not equal to the white man; that slavery subordination to the superior race is his natural and normal condition.” Stephens’s statue is in Washington because of, not despite, that kind of rhetoric. How is that not institutionalized racism?

John Brown Gordon statue. Jill Nolin/Georgia Recorder

Look at Stone Mountain, a state park at the site of the rebirth of the KKK, a park that was created to celebrate the Confederacy and that is still dedicated to that cause in state law. Look at the lawns of the state Capitol, dominated by an equestrian statue of Confederate Gen. John Brown Gordon, who founded the original KKK here in Georgia.

Many older Georgia adults were taught in school that it was tariffs, not slavery, that drove creation of the Confederacy, because the admission that the cause was slavery was deemed “divisive” and might reflect poorly on the dominant white power structure. It was only 50 years ago that we desegregated our schools. It was only 20 years ago that we managed to strip the Confederate battle emblem from the Georgia flag, and the man who led that fight, Gov. Roy Barnes, was then defeated for re-election in large part because of backlash against his leadership.

And it was barely a year ago that two separate Georgia prosecutor offices decided that the murder of an unarmed Black jogger by a group of armed white men in broad daylight, on a public street, was not a crime worthy of prosecution. You’ve probably seen the video of Ahmaud Arbery’s last moments – those prosecutors had seen it too, yet somehow they decided that no crime had been committed and no arrests should be made. That decision was driven by governmental, institutional racism. It is alive and thriving, in our time, and Fox News notwithstanding, white people are not its target.

Just this week, Fox News host Tucker Carlson launched into a diatribe complaining about refugees from Congo being resettled in largely white communities such as Lewiston, Maine, describing it as part of a plot by the Biden administration “to change Maine’s demographics as well as the population mix in every other state in the union” to undermine white control. If racism is mere “deviations, betrayals and failures” to live up to the authentic founding principles of the United States, then those deviations and betrayals continue among us, right now, in places of power and influence.

We have made enormous progress in this country against racism, and it is essential that we teach that too, both because it is true and because by telling it we create hope for still further progress. But that progress has never come easy, and at every step of the way, we have had to battle those who claim that it is not racism and bigotry that divide us, but those who dare to point out the continued existence of racism and bigotry.

It’s what was said about the abolitionists before the Civil War, about Reconstruction after the war, about those who fought lynching in the 1920s and segregation in the 1950s and 1960s.

The current hysteria over “critical race theory,” and the actions of Kemp and the Board of Education, are merely the latest manifestations of that long and unfortunate tradition.

Jay Bookman covered Georgia and national politics for nearly 30 years for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, earning numerous national, regional and state journalism awards. 



originally published at http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ncpolicywatch.com%2F2021%2F06%2F11%2Fsome-simple-truths-about-critical-race-theory-and-the-cynical-campaign-to-distort-it%2F by Mark McCormick and Jay Bookman

The post Some simple truths about critical race theory and the cynical campaign to distort it first appeared on North Carolina Chronicle.

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